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Thursday June 28, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 271
GOV. SIGNS BUDGET
STATE PAGE 3
S.F.GIANTS
SWEEP L.A.
SPORTS PAGE 11
HEALTH CARE
COUNTDOWN
NATION PAGE 6
PROPOSAL RELIES HEAVILY ON VOTERS APPROVING HIS
PROPOSED TAX HIKES
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, is
urging the South Bayside Waste Management
Authority board to delay eliminating a
whistleblowers job pending a full review,
hearing and investigation of the serious alle-
gations made in a Wednesday Daily Journal
article.
The SBWMA, or
RethinkWaste, board is
scheduled to adopt next
years budget today that
includes eliminating the
recycling coordinator
position.
That position is cur-
rently held by Cathy
Hidalgo, who claims her
job is on the chopping
block because she repeat-
edly complained about
contracts arranged by the
agencys Executive
Director Kevin
McCarthy, including one
that added on an extra
$100,000 for a consultant
that was not approved by
or disclosed to the full board.
Hill sent a letter to SBWMA Chair Jim
Porter yesterday asking for a thorough inves-
tigation into the allegations and pointed to
previous concerns raised about the agencys
contract awarding process by the San Mateo
County Civil Grand Jury.
A 2009 grand jury report was critical of the
Whistleblower probe sought
State lawmaker wants investigation into waste agency allegations
Local graduate,
dropout numbers
better thanstate
San Mateo County graduation
rate up 2 percent since 2010
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Locally, 10.5 percent of students dropped out of high school
compared to the California average of 14.4 percent, according
to a statewide report released by the California Department of
Education Wednesday.
More than three quarters of students who started high school
in California in 2007 graduated in 2011, according to a four-
year study that shows a 14.4 percent dropout rate. Graduation
rates statewide were at 76.3 percent for the class of 2010-11,
according to information collected over four years in the
California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System. San
Mateo County fared better with a 10.5 percent dropout rate and
an 83.7 percent graduation rate. This is only the second time
this data was collected from a single group of students over
four years. As a result, the state and local districts are improv-
ing their abilities to track students as well as support programs
for at-risk students.
Redwood City weighingthe
future of inner harbor area
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With a new county jail among other facilities slated for a
piece of Redwood City on the east side of Highway 101, city
ofcials are ready to lock down plans for the future of the site
known as the Inner Harbor.
The plan is still so far in its infancy ofcials are working on
establishing the public involvement process instead of creating
the action plan itself. But, at a public hearing Monday night to
gure out how best to move toward developing a precise plan,
councilmembers agreed the time is right to focus on the prop-
Jerry Hill Cathy Hidalgo
See GRAD RATE, Page 18
See HARBOR, Page 20
JUNIOR FIRE ACADEMY IN FULL SWING
ROSIE LINARES/DAILY JOURNAL
Top right: South San Francisco Fireghter Bryan
Golden,right,tightens the safety gear of 13-year-old
Gabi Velez before beginning the days activities
during the Junior Fire Academy week-long program.
Above:Eleven-year-old Blake White is lowered down
a three-story elevator shaft. Left: A South San
Francisco Junior Fire Academy student rides a zip
line from a three-story building yesterday.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Local parents are hoping to open a
new charter school in Redwood City in
the 2013-14 school year that welcomes
the diverse makeup of the community
and features shared leadership, social-
emotional learning and an inquiry-based
approach, according to a proposal shared
during last nights school board meeting.
The proposal for Connect Community
Charter School, the rst charter petition
to go before the board in a number of
years, outlines a plan to operate on the
east side of town with a focus on social-
emotional learning and inquiry-based
learning that would, at capacity, serve
300 students in kindergarten through
eighth grade.
We are a district of choice, said
Superintendent Jan Christensen.
Christensen said the proposal included
some exciting items. District staff and
Connect backers will meet in July to
clarify details. Trustees, who had similar
comments about the proposal, will send
Christensen questions before the meet-
ing. Should it move forward, there
would need to be an agreement to cover
some items like special education, she
said. Lastly, the district contracted with
School Services to do an independent
analysis of the proposed budget. The
proposal will go back before the board
for a vote in August.
The 118-page petition took more than
a year for the 13 founders most of
whom live in the district and are parents
to put together. Four of the founders
Redwood City charter proposal heard
Plan to open 300-student school will go to a vote in August
See HILL, Page 20
See SCHOOL, Page 18
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta is 74.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1712
Philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau,
one of the most inuential thinkers of
the 18th century Enlightenment, was
born in Geneva.
Man is born free; and everywhere he is in
chains.One thinks himself the master of others,
and still remains a greater slave than they.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)
Comedian-movie
director Mel
Brooks is 86.
Actor John Cusack
is 46.
In other news ...
Birthdays
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateos new Fire Chief Michael Keefe, left, arrives at Station 21 on Ellsworth Avenue yesterday afternoon with retiring
Fire Chief Dan Belville for a changing of the guard ceremony. About 200 attended the event, including re chiefs from
neighboring cities. Keefe will also oversee the Foster City Fire Department.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph
increasing to 10 to 20 mph in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog and drizzle after midnight. Lows around
50. Northwest winds 10 to 20
mph...Becoming 5 to 10 mph after mid-
night.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle in the morning.
Highs in the mid 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows
around 50. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming part-
ly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the mid 60s.
Saturday night and Sunday: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in rst place; Big Ben, No.4,in second place; and
Solid Gold No. 10, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:41.19.
(Answers tomorrow)
OBESE AWAIT GROOVY NUMBER
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When Sonny caught Cher after she stumbled and
fell on stage, he said this I GOT YOU, BABE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CFIKL
CEXTA
DWYOSR
PFPOLY
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
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w
w
w
.
f
a
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b
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k
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c
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m
/
ju
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le
Answer
here:
2 1 0
3 16 23 35 36 20
Mega number
June 26 Mega Millions
8 20 30 33 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 0 2 5
Daily Four
0 0 1
Daily three evening
In 1778, the Revolutionary War Battle of Monmouth took place
in New Jersey; it was from this battle that the legend of Molly
Pitcher arose.
In 1836, the fourth president of the United States, James
Madison, died in Montpelier, Va.
In 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife,
Sophie, were assassinated in Sarajevo (sah-ruh-YAY-voh) by
Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip the event which sparked
World War I.
In 1919, the Treaty of Versailles (vehr-SY) was signed in France,
ending the First World War. In Independence, Mo., future presi-
dent Harry S. Truman married Elizabeth Virginia Wallace.
In 1922, the Irish Civil War began between rival nationalists over
the Anglo-Irish Treaty establishing the Irish Free State. (The con-
ict lasted nearly a year, resulting in defeat for anti-treaty forces.)
In 1939, Pan American Airways began regular trans-Atlantic air
service with a ight that departed New York for Marseilles,
France.
In 1944, the Republican national convention in Chicago nomi-
nated New York Gov. Thomas E. Dewey for president and Ohio
Gov. John W. Bricker for vice president.
In 1950, North Korean forces captured Seoul (sohl), the capital
of South Korea.
In 1962, a jury in New York awarded $3.5 million to former
radio-TV personality John Henry Faulk in his libel suit against
the group AWARE Inc. and two individuals whod accused him
of Communist sympathies and gotten him blacklisted. (The judg-
ment was reduced to $550,000 by an appeals court.)
In 1978, the Supreme Court ordered the University of California-
Davis Medical School to admit Allan Bakke (BAHK-ee), a white
man who argued hed been a victim of reverse racial discrimina-
tion.
Senate Armed Services Chairman Carl Levin, D-Mich., is 78.
Comedian-impressionist John Byner is 75. Rock musician Dave
Knights (Procul Harum) is 67. Actor Bruce Davison is 66. Actress
Kathy Bates is 64. Actress Alice Krige is 58. College and Pro
Football Hall of Famer John Elway is 52. Record company chief
executive Tony Mercedes is 50. Actress Jessica Hecht is 47. Rock
musician Saul Davies (James) is 47. Actress Mary Stuart
Masterson is 46. Actor Gil Bellows is 45. Actress-singer Danielle
Brisebois is 43. Jazz musician Jimmy Sommers is 43. Actress
Tichina Arnold is 43. Actor Alessandro Nivola is 40. Actress
Camille Guaty is 36. Rock musician Tim Nordwind (OK Go) is 36.
Police: Five suspected
of stealing 9.5 tons of garlic
VIENNA Austrian police did not
need snifng dogs to locate this suspect-
ed heist 9.5 tons of garlic.
The Austria Press Agency says police
stopped three overloaded and sagging
vans about to cross into Hungary from
Austria on Wednesday and found them
packed to the roof with the pungent
cargo. After questioning the ve men in
the vehicles they charged them on suspi-
cion of receiving stolen goods.
Police say the garlic apparently came
from Spain and estimate its value at
(euro) 30,000 ($37,500). The men all
Romanian nationals were not named,
in line with Austrian privacy laws.
APA cites one ofcer as saying it was
clear what the vans were carrying even
before their doors were opened.
All three vehicles really stunk like gar-
lic, he says.
Firefighters rescue dog who
chased raccoon 30 feet up tree
When a call came in last week to a San
Mateo County emergency dispatch center
that a dog had climbed 30 feet up a tree in
Atherton and couldnt get down, no one
believed it.
Menlo Park Fire Protection District
Fire Chief Harold Schapelhouman said
that in his 32 years of service, hes res-
cued plenty of cats that were stuck in
trees, and even some exotic pet birds, but
never a dog.
The dispatchers thought, Whoever it
is must be wrong, Schapelhouman said.
Ive never seen or heard of a dog that
could climb a tree.
On June 19 at about 9 p.m., a 40-pound
Wheaten Terrier named Guinness pur-
sued a raccoon high into the branches of
an oak tree. Guinness got stuck, and his
owner climbed the tree but couldnt reach
him.
When reghters arrived, the dog was
suspended in branches hanging over a
drainage channel, Schapelhouman said.
Fireghters used an improvised rescue
harness, a rope system and a 36-foot lad-
der to reach Guinness, who was frozen in
place, nervous and shaking.
Fireghter Tony Eggimann climbed the
ladder, secured Guinness in his harness
and gave him a treat, Schapelhouman
said.
The dog was safely carried down and
reunited with his grateful owners.
Schapelhouman, who said he has had
decades of experience working with
highly trained search-and-rescue dogs,
said he has never seen a canine scale a
tree like Guinness.
Its unbelievable, he said. That dog
could really climb.
Guinness owners have since put a
fence around the tree.
Lohan resolves civil
case over car chase
LOS ANGELES Lindsay Lohan has
resolved a case led by three men she
took on a high-speed
ride that resulted in
her second driving
under the inuence
arrest in 2007.
Attorneys for the
25-year-old actress
and the men con-
firmed Wednesday
the lawsuit has been
settled before trial.
Terms were not dis-
closed.
Lohans attorney Ed McPherson says a
dismissal notice will be led in court. He
says Lohan can now devote her full atten-
tion to her career.
4 19 38 42 44 19
Mega number
June 27 Super Lotto Plus
Lindsay Lohan
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
On June 19 a 40-pound Wheaten Terrier
named Guinness pursued a raccoon
high into the branches of an oak tree.
3
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
SAN MATEO
Robbery. Someones purse was snatched on
the 1700 block of South Delaware Street
before 9:37 a.m. Monday, June 25.
Vandalism. Walls were vandalized on the 900
block of Alameda de las Pulgas before 7:11
a.m. Sunday, June 24.
Vandalism. An employee of Joy Sushi saw a
man break a window at the business on the
rst block of B Street before 11:02 p.m.
Friday, June 22.
Fraud. A woman with a fake ID attempted to
cash $11,000 in checks on the 500 block of
East Fourth Avenue before 6:09 p.m. Friday,
June 22.
Fraud. Someone reported they were passed
fake $100 bills at Americano Deli Grill on the
200 block of East Hillsdale Boulevard before
3:48 p.m. Friday, June 22.
REDWOOD CITY
Vandalism. A cinderblock was used to break a
car window and steal a compact disc player on
Marshall Street before 10:33 a.m. on Tuesday,
June 26.
Theft. Wallets were reportedly stolen on
Walnut Street before 12:10 p.m. on Tuesday,
June 26.
Burglary. A laundromat was burglarized on
Rolison Road before 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
June 26. A washer and dryer were damaged
and money was stolen.
Police reports
Asleep at the wheel
A woman fell asleep in her vehicle with
her foot on the brake at Saratoga Drive
and Franklin Parkway in San Mateo
before 12:59 a.m. Friday, June 22.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A re engine in San Carlos will likely be
browned out during one of three shifts while
the department lls six vacancies, the city
manager told the City Council earlier this
week.
As of last week, the department had 24 bud-
geted positions with four vacancies but on
Monday received resignation notices from
two reghters. Those workers are taking jobs
with the city of Oakland. The city is in the
process of hiring six reghters to begin the
re academy this fall and join the department
at the start of the new year.
The citys shortage combined with
Redwood Citys own stafng challenges leads
Fire Chief Jim Skinner to anticipate browning
out an engine on C shift at Station 16 on
Alameda de las Pulgas. Redwood City and
San Carlos share a hybrid department.
The brownout will provide relief to the
workload of extra shifts on the current
employees of both re departments and ease
overtime costs, San Carlos City Manager Jeff
Maltbie said in a prepared statement.
The station will be staffed despite the
brownout plan on days when enough person-
nel signed up on C shift for overtime, Maltbie
said.
During brownouts, re and paramedics will
serve San Carlos from the closest available
stations or surrounding jurisdictions.
San Carlos fire may face brownouts
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Gov. Jerry Brown
signed a new budget for California on
Wednesday that relies heavily on voters
approving his proposed tax hikes in
November.
Democrats passed 21 budget implementing
bills on a majority vote intended to satisfy the
governors demand for deeper cuts to close a
$15.7 billion decit, and Brown signed the
main bill before a midnight deadline.
In my view, we are poised to enter a new
and better era in California. An era of budget
stability with the opportunity to begin build-
ing and rebuilding, Senate President Pro Tem
Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, said about
completing the package.
The spending plan for the scal year start-
ing July 1 includes welfare and social service
cuts. It also assumes voters will approve
Browns tax hike on the November ballot.
If voters reject the tax initiative, a series of
automatic cuts will be triggered, including
three weeks less of public school for the next
two years.
Brown believes the tax initiative will raise
$8.5 billion in the new s-
cal year starting July 1 by
increasing the sales tax by
a quarter cent to 7.5 per-
cent for four years, and
boosting the income tax on
people who make more
than $250,000 a year for
seven years.
This is a game of chick-
en where you want to swap
our educational system for tax increases,
tuition for tax increases, said Assemblyman
Tim Donnelly, R-Twin Peaks. This is an
abject disaster.
A recent Field Poll found California voters
divided on the initiative, with 52 percent in
favor and 35 percent opposed.
One of the bills could give the tax initiative
top billing on the November ballot ahead of a
competing tax hike proposal by wealthy civil
rights attorney Molly Munger. The bill would
require bond measures and constitutional
amendments to appear on the ballot ahead of
other initiatives and referendums.
Browns proposed tax hikes would be tem-
porary but include constitutional changes to
local government funding.
Bown signs budget relying on taxes
Fills a $15.7 billion decit. However, an estimated $8.5
billion in revenue is contingent on voters approving a
Nov. 6 ballot issue calling for increasing the sales tax
and raising income tax for people who make more
than $250,000 a year.
Phases in a two-year time limit for people enrolled in
the welfare-to-work program to nd a job. Currently,
parents on welfare have four years.
Allows Brown to furlough state workers without an
agreement with their unions for a 5 percent reduction
in wages.
Merges service delivery in Californias Medi-Cal
program for those who are eligible for both Medi-Cal
and Medicare. Reduces payments to hospitals.
Eliminates the childrens health insurance program
Healthy Families. Moves 880,000 children currently
enrolled to Medi-Cal.
Reduces child care assistance by 8.7 percent, which
will cut slots available to low-income families by
10,600.
Requires higher graduation rates for colleges and
universities to qualify for state college aid. Reduces Cal
Grants beginning in the 2013-14 school year from
about $9,700 to $9,000.The grant is lowered again to
$8,000 in 2014-15. Students planning to attend for-
prot colleges like University of Phoenix will get even
less nancial aid, about $4,000.
Extends a 3.6 percent across-the-board cut for in-
home care.
Calls for about $6 billion in cuts to take effect on Jan. 1
if voters do not approve the tax initiative. About $5.5
billion would come from reducing the public school
year from 175 days to 160 for two years. Almost all the
rest would come from cuts to the University of
California and California State University systems.
Budget highlights
Jerry Brown
4
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Sports Teams, Clinics, Camps, Classes & Training
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SPORTS CLINICS & CAMPS
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Each clinic and camp includes
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Experienced coaching by those
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Featuring:
Vol l eybal l Coach Jenni f er Agresti
Lacrosse Coach Jen Lee
Free Nike T-Shirt for each participant
Beginning May 29, 2012
Daily sessions Monday through Friday
9am-12pm or 1pm-4pm or 9am-4pm
Extended hours available by reservation
Daily and weekly rates. Ask about our multiple week pricing.
650-654-4444
www.payesplace.com
595 Industrial Road, San Carlos 94070
(Mid-Peninsula at Hwy 101 & Holly Street)
Police report rash of
break-ins in Foster City
Police in Foster City responded to three
separate daytime incidents in which sus-
pects entered or attempted to enter single-
family homes Tuesday.
The cases took place between 11 a.m.
and 2 p.m. and all within two blocks of
Edgewater Boulevard. No one was home
and no one was injured, though two resi-
dents had property stolen including jew-
elry and electronic equipment, according
to police.
No suspect information is available.
Police encourage residents to report
suspicious activity by calling (650) 573-
3333.
Coroner unable to
identify Caltrain victim
The identity of a man in a wheelchair
struck and killed by a Caltrain Thursday
afternoon remains a mystery, Coroner
Robert Foucrault wrote in a statement
yesterday.
The victim is described as a white
male, 60 to 75 years old, about 5 feet 5
inches tall and weighing about 130
pounds.
He has brown eyes, gray hair cut in a
at-top style with a moustache. The vic-
tim was last seen wearing a black
Fumagalli pea coat, Old Navy Classic Fit
button-down black short-sleeved shirt,
Old Navy Classic Black pants, black
socks and black leather dress shoes.
At the time of the incident, he was rid-
ing a Go-Go Pride Mobility Scooter.
Anyone with information that will
assist in identifying the man should
call the San Mateo County Coroners
Office at (650) 312-5562.
PG&E: 1956 pipeline test
caused San Bruno blast
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. told
California regulators this week that a
pipeline test the company performed in
1956 damaged a weld and led to the 2010
deadly explosion in San Bruno.
PG&E made the claim in a ling sub-
mitted Tuesday to the California Public
Utilities Commission, which has
launched numerous investigations into
the company that could result in millions
in nes in the wake of the blast on Sept.
9, 2010. The explosion sparked a gas-
fueled inferno that left eight people dead
and destroyed dozens of homes.
Commission staff previously has said
that the company broke federal pipeline
safety rules by failing to perform a
pipeline strength test.
CITY GOVERNMENT
The Belmont City Council
voted 4-0 Tuesday night to raise
sewer rates by 19 percent over
the next two years. Officials say
the increase is necessary to
fund outstanding bond debt and
to repair and replace the citys
aging infrastructure. The aver-
age residents bill will climb from the current $507.69 a
year to $555.92 next year and $605.96 the year after.
Councilwoman Coralin Feierbach missed the meet-
ing.
Local briefs
5
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
201 E. 4TH Ave.
San Mateo, CA 94401
650-342-7088
Catering menu available
Please call or download from:
www.mypizzaman.com
WEEKEND SPECIAL
LARGE 2-TOPPING SPECIAL
DOUBLE DEAL 14
DOUBLE DEAL 16
Buy any pizza and get one
FREE
Second pizza must be of equal
or lesser value. Valid Friday,
Saturday and Sunday only.
Coupon cannot be combined. Must
mention offer when placing order.
Large 16 Pizza with up to
2 toppings & one 2L soda
$
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without soda $14
Coupon cannot be combined. Must mention
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Two Med 14 Pizza with
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Two Lg 16 Pizza with
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Coupon cannot be combined. Must mention
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By Paul Larson


MILLBRAE I
recently attended a
family funeral in
Southern California.
The burial took
place at a long
established Catholic
Cemetery which
later decided to build a Mortuary facility on
their property. I knew from past experience
that this cemetery was well maintained and
had a good reputation. The immediate
family had other loved-ones buried at the
cemetery and wished to return this time too.
With the knowledge that this cemetery had a
Mortuary on the grounds they trusted it to be
convenient and decided to have this facility
handle the funeral arrangements.
Prior to the funeral I had some phone
contact with the Mortuary staff and saw
nothing out of the ordinary. But soon after I
spoke to family members who relayed
troubling details such as higher than average
costs, questionable service and other
apprehensions that raised a red-fag. I
listened carefully taking into consideration
that funerals and arrangements may be
conducted differently in Southern California
(as compared to here on the Peninsula).
Later though I discovered that these
concerns and others were all valid as I
experienced them myself during the funeral.
Coming from the background of owning
a family run and community supportive
funeral home I was embarrassed at what I
saw as a production line process with little
compassion or time to care for the families
this Mortuary is supposed to be serving.
I wondered how the Catholic Church
could allow this Mortuary to operate in such
a manner? Well, I did some research and
discovered that the Archdiocese of Los
Angeles has mortuaries located on a
number of their cemetery properties, but
does not operate them. According to the
Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern
California the Archdiocese has an
arrangement with Stewart Enterprises
which is a New Orleans based mortuary
corporation. Stewart Enterprises runs a
website called Catholic Mortuaries.com
giving a misleading impression to many that
the Catholic Church operates these facilities.
When patronizing one of these
mortuaries on Catholic cemetery grounds
most families assume that they will be
receiving a level of comfort as they would
from their local church or parish priest.
None of this was evident during my
experience of extremely high costs
(compared to what was received) and the
dis-interested service provided by the
mortuary staff. I dont see this as a failing
of the Catholic cemetery, but of those in
charge of running this mortuary.
The point Im trying to make is to do
your homework and shop for a Funeral
establishment you are comfortable with.
Just because a Mortuary is located on
cemetery property doesnt mean they are
your only choice or that they offer fair costs
or give better quality ofservice. You have
the right to select what ever funeral home
you wish to conduct the arrangements. Talk
to various funeral directors, and ask friends
and families who they would recommend.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Advertisement
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A schizophrenic man previously hospital-
ized as incompetent to stand trial on murder
charges now claims he was insane when he
allegedly stabbed a fellow client at a San
Carlos vocational center more than seven
years ago.
Vitin Ajani Cruz, 38, entered twin pleas of
not guilty and not guilty by reason of insanity
in the Oct. 27, 2004 fatal stabbing of Alfonso
Ruiz at Vocational Rehabilitation Services in
San Carlos.
The dual pleas mean a jury will rst deter-
mine if Cruz is guilty and, if the answer is yes,
follow with a separate trial on the sanity ques-
tion. After Cruz entered his pleas, doctors
were appointed to evaluate his sanity. Those
reports will play a role in the trial.
Cruz spent several years in and out of a state
mental facility after being arrested in Ruizs
death. He returned to San Mateo County last
November after doctors concluded he is now
able to aid in his own defense. His attorney
did not contest the nding but warned his
mental condition is fragile and Cruz remains
housed in a psychiatric facility without bail
while awaiting trial.
Competency is a persons ability to aid in
his or her own defense while sanity is a per-
sons mental state at the time of an alleged act.
According to prosecutors, Cruz attacked
Ruiz at Vocational Rehabilitation Services on
Quarry Road in San Carlos. Authorities said
Cruz mistook Ruiz for another man as they sat
next to each other at the center and suddenly
lunged at him with a knife. Ruiz was stabbed
several times in the upper torso and arm. Cruz
ed but was arrested a few blocks away from
the site. Ruiz died the following afternoon.
If convicted of murder and found sane, Cruz
faces up to 26 years in prison.
Accused killer claims insanity at time of stabbing
By Gosia Wozniacka
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STOCKTON When Stockton becomes
the largest U.S. city ever to le for bankruptcy,
it will strike a hard blow to residents, especial-
ly city employees and retirees whose health
benets and pensions helped drive the city
toward insolvency.
City Manager Bob Deis said late Tuesday
that ofcials were left with little choice but to
recommend bankruptcy after failing to hammer
out deals with creditors to ease the citys $26
million budget shortfall.
Deis expects the city to le for Chapter 9 pro-
tection by Friday.
Stockton will join a number of other cities
and counties across the nation that have
plunged into nancial crisis as the recession
made it tough to cover rising costs involving
current and former employees, bondholders and
vendors.
Whats going on in Stockton is endemic to
whats going on all over the state and the coun-
try, said Michael Sweet, a San Francisco bank-
ruptcy attorney at Fox Rothschild LLP. Local
governments are hurting and strained under the
current pension and compensation systems.
These systems are not appropriate for the type
of economy this country has evolved into.
At a standing room-only Stockton City
Council meeting Tuesday, numerous former
city employees talked about their life-threaten-
ing medical conditions and said cuts to their
health benets prompted by the citys nancial
straits meant they would, in effect, lose their
insurance.
Some people will be devastated. There are
those who have such severe medical problems
that they will not be taken up by any medical
company, said Gary Gillis, a retired re chief
on the board of directors of the city retiree asso-
ciation. This plan appears to be a sledgeham-
mer or a machete.
Several retirees broke down in tears after the
city approved changes to their medical benets
as part of a bankruptcy budget adopted by the
City Council.
For me, bankruptcy might as well be a life
sentence, said Gary Jones, a retired police of-
cer, who was diagnosed with a brain tumor 10
years ago. Jones said his medical insurance
enabled him to undergo chemotherapy and
other treatments, which he said will be unaf-
fordable at the lower level of coverage.
Stockton bankruptcy is hard hit for city
ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL
Stockton now has the second-highest foreclosure rate in the nation.
Famed Crystal Cathedral
to become Catholic church
GARDEN GROVE Retired school-
teacher Dolores Rommel has followed the
Rev. Robert H. Schuller almost her entire
adult life: She was baptized in his church as a
young woman, sent her children to his Sunday
school and laid her husband to rest near the
soaring, glass-paned Crystal Cathedral that
was to be the televangelists ultimate legacy.
But when the Roman Catholic church
bought the famous sanctuary and its cemetery
in bankruptcy court last year, Rommel began
looking for another spiritual home.
Around the state
6
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Hundreds of businesses, from
high-tech startups to medical
ofces, will now have access to
turbo-charged Internet speeds as a
state-of-the-art broadband project
has been completed in downtown
San Mateo.
The project, a joint effort between
the San Mateo Area Chamber of
Commerce and Comcast, upgraded
the broadband in downtowns
underground utility district.
The expansion allows for down-
load speeds of up to 100 megabits
per second and upload speeds of up
to 10 megabits per second.
Bandwidth up to 10 gigabits per
second will be available for busi-
nesses with the largest data needs,
according to Comcast.
The project, approved by the city,
took about six months to complete
and will allow local businesses
downtown to connect to advanced
telecommunications services and
Comcasts business-class offerings,
which will be delivered over an
optical ber backbone.
The project dubbed Digital
Downtown was the brainchild of
the Economic Development Growth
Enterprise, an initiative of San
Mateos chamber.
After listening to the concerns of
San Mateos business community
and collaborating with city staff,
EDGE ofcials approached several
broadband providers late in 2010 to
investigate how higher-speed broad-
band could be brought to down-
town.
Comcast was the only provider to
engage the group and offer to make
the major capital investment,
according to an EDGE statement
yesterday.
The investment should make
downtown San Mateo a vibrant hub
for business, Linda Asbury, presi-
dent of the San Mateo Area
Chamber of Commerce wrote in a
statement.
The area will benet from the
increased data density and content
richness available through the new
service, San Mateo Mayor Brandt
Grotte wrote in a statement.
San Mateo councilmen Robert
Ross and Jack Matthews both told
the Daily Journal yesterday that the
new broadband service should help
keep some growing businesses
downtown and attract others that
need the high-speed service.
The Comcast Business Class
Ethernet suite offers point-to-point
and multi-point Metro Ethernet
services with the capacity to deliver
cloud computing, software-as-a-
service, business continuity/disaster
recovery and other bandwidth-
intensive applications.
The company hopes this project
could become a model for other
cities to follow.
Digital Downtown boosts broadband
Contempt of Congress
issue may fizzle after vote
WASHINGTON A House vote
nding Attorney General Eric Holder
in contempt of
Congress on
Thursday would
create election-
year reworks
but maybe not
much lasting siz-
zle. Federal
judges whove
been called into
similar disputes
often sound like
frazzled moms, in essence telling
Congress and the president, I dont
care who started it, you two end it.
Time appears to be limited for the
House to pursue a criminal contempt
case against Holder or a civil case to
compel President Barack Obamas
administration to turn over subpoe-
naed documents. A contempt cita-
tion against Holder presumably
would expire when the current
Congress ends in January.
If the courts do end up deciding
the case, however, they could shed
some light on a foggy patch of con-
stitutional law: What happens when
Congress demands that a president
turn over documents he says should
be kept secret?
Particularly, once the president
invokes executive privilege to deny
Congress documents it has subpoe-
naed.
Saudi man found guilty
in Texas bomb plot trial
AMARILLO, Texas In the
months before his arrest, authorities
said, Khalid Ali-
M Aldawsari
collected bomb-
making supplies
and instructional
videos and made
a list of targets,
from nuclear
power plants to
the home of a
former presi-
dent. His goal,
they said, was to
carry out jihad.
Despite his attorneys protestations
that he was a harmless failure,
Aldawsari was convicted Wednesday
of attempting to use a weapon of mass
destruction. He faces up to life in
prison and is scheduled to be sen-
tenced Oct. 9. Aldawsari, a 22-year-
old former Texas Tech University stu-
dent, closed his eyes as the verdict
was read. It took the jury fewer than
two hours to convict him.
Aldawsari was arrested in February
2011 after federal agents secretly
searched his West Texas apartment
and found bomb-making chemicals,
wiring, a hazmat suit and clocks. He
also researched possible targets:
nuclear power plants, the homes of
three former soldiers that were sta-
tioned at Abu Ghraib prison and the
Dallas home of former President
George W. Bush.
Around the nation
By Julie Pace
and Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Barely four
months before the nation votes, one
of the biggest factors in the ght for
the White House still is a mystery.
That will change on Thursday.
The Supreme Courts expected rul-
ing on President Barack Obamas
sweeping federal health care law will
shape the contours of the presidential
campaign through the summer and
fall. Both Obama and Republican
rival Mitt Romney are primed to use
the ruling whatever it is for
political gain.
Obama expresses condence the
court will uphold his signature leg-
islative initiative. But he wont be
shocked if a conservative majority
overturns the most controversial pro-
vision, those familiar with his think-
ing say. Romney aides say the
Republican candidate will get a polit-
ical boost if the court strikes down
the measure. But they dont want cel-
ebrations that could alienate voters
who could lose health care benets
through the decision.
Neither candidate has any direct
influence over the decision. The
court may uphold the health care law,
strike it down or deem the require-
ment that most Americans carry
health insurance unconstitutional
while keeping other aspects in place.
The ruling is expected to be fol-
lowed almost immediately by a bar-
rage of advertisements and fundrais-
ing appeals from Democrats and
Republicans, with both sides trying
to cast the decision in the most
advantageous light for its candidate.
Romney, running on a pledge to
repeal Obamas overhaul as a costly
federal power grab, has focused more
than usual on the Supreme Court rul-
ing this week. In campaign appear-
ances in Virginia, New Jersey and
New York, he offered supporters and
donors a preview
of his likely
response to the
decision.
My guess is
theyre not sleep-
ing real well at
the White House
tonight, a con-
dent Romney
told cheering
supporters gath-
ered Wednesday
evening at a
Sterling, Va.,
electronics man-
ufacturer.
The night
before, he told
donors in New
Jersey that if the
Supreme Court
lets the law stand, it will make it
very clear to the American people
that they must elect someone who
will stop it. If the high court over-
turns the law, then the rst three and
a half years of the Obama adminis-
tration will have been entirely wast-
ed, because thats where he devoted
his energy and passion, the
Republican said.
Romneys campaign also is run-
ning new ads this week in Virginia,
North Carolina and Iowa promising
he would move to repeal
Obamacare on his rst day in ofce.
Obama, while recently avoiding
mentioning the impending court rul-
ing directly, has vigorously defended
the overhaul as critical to the publics
health and well-being in his own
campaign events this week.
I think it was the right thing to do.
I know it was the right thing to do,
he told supporters in Boston.
The White House also published a
blog post Wednesday touting the
benets of the overhaul, including
free preventive services for people on
Medicare and health insurance
rebates for nearly 13 million
Americans.
Health ruling to end campaign mystery
Q:WhatiftheSupremeCourt,despitejustices
bluntquestionsduringpublicarguments,up-
holds thelawandnds Congress was within
its authoritytorequire most people tohave
healthinsuranceor payapenalty?
A: That would settle the legal argument but not
the political battle.
Theclear winnersif thelawisupheldandallowed
to take full effect would be uninsured people in
the United States,estimated at more than 50 mil-
lion.
Starting in 2014, most could get coverage
through a mix of private insurance and Medic-
aid, a safety-net program. Republican-led states
that have resisted creating health insurance mar-
kets under the law would have to scramble to
comply, but the U.S. would get closer to other
economically advanced countries that guaran-
tee medical care for their citizens.
Republicans would keep trying to block the law.
They hope to elect Mitt Romney as president,
backed by a GOP House and Senate, and repeal
the law, although their chances of outright re-
peal would seem to be diminished by the courts
endorsement.
Obama would feel the glow of vindication for his
hard-fought healthoverhaul,but it might not last
long even if hes re-elected.
The nation still faces huge problems with health
care costs, requiring major changes to Medicare
that neither party has explained squarely to vot-
ers. Some backers of Obamas law acknowledge
it was only a rst installment: Get most people
covered, then deal with the harder problem of
costs.
Q: Ontheotherhand,whatif thecourtstrikes
downtheentirelaw?
A: Many people would applaud, polls suggest.
Taking down the law would kill a costly new fed-
eral entitlement before it has a chance to take
root and develop a clamoring constituency. But
that still would leave the problems of high costs,
waste and millions of uninsured people.
Some Republicans in Congress already are talk-
ingabout passinganewthemorepopular pieces
of the law if its thrown out.But the major GOP al-
ternativestoObamaslawwouldnot cover nearly
as many uninsured, and its unclear how much
of a dent they would make in costs. Some liber-
alssayMedicare-for-all,or government-runhealth
insurance,will emerge as the only viable answer
if Obamas public-private approach fails.
People who already have health insurance could
lose some ground as well. Employers and insur-
ance companies would have no obligation to
keep providing popular new benets such as
preventive care with no copayments and cover-
age for young adults until age 26 on a parents
plan.Medicare recipients with high prescription
drug costs could lose discounts averaging about
$600.
Q:Whathappensif thecourtstrikesdownthe
requirement thateveryonemust haveinsur-
ance,butleavestherestoftheAffordableCare
Act inplace?
A: People would have no obligation to carry in-
surance, but insurers would remain bound by
the law to accept applicants regardless of med-
ical condition and limit what they charge their
oldest and sickest customers.
Studies suggest premiums in the individual
health insurance market would jump by 10 per-
cent to 30 percent.
Experts debate whether or not that would trig-
ger the collapse of the market for individuals and
small businesses, or just make coverage even
harder to afford than it is now.In any event,there
would be risks to the health care system. Fewer
people would sign up for coverage.
The insurance mandate was primarily a means
toanend,awaytocreateabigpool of customers
and allow premiums to remain affordable.Other
forms of arm-twisting could be found, including
limited enrollment periods and penalties for late
sign-up, but such approaches probably would
require congressional cooperation.
Unless theres a political deal to x it,the compli-
catedlegislationwouldget moredifcult tocarry
out.Congressional Republicanssaytheywill keep
pushing for repeal.
Without the mandate,millions of uninsured low-
income people still would get coverage through
the laws Medicaid expansion. The problem
wouldbethe10millionto15millionmiddleclass
peopleexpectedtogainprivateinsuranceunder
the law.They would be eligible for federal subsi-
dies, but premiums would get more expensive.
Taxes, Medicare cuts and penalties on employ-
ers not offering coverage would stay in place.
Q:Whatifthecourtstrikesdownthemandate
andalsoinvalidates theparts of thelawthat
requireinsurancecompaniestocoverpeople
regardlessof medical problemsandthatlimit
what peoplecanbecharged.
A: Many fewer people would get covered, but
the health insurance industry would avoid a dire
nancial hit.
Insurers could continue screening out people
with a history of medical problems diabetes
patients or cancer survivors, for example.
That wouldprevent asuddenjumpinpremiums.
But it would leave consumers with no assurance
that they could get health insurance when they
need it,which is a major problem the law was in-
tended to x.
Obama administration lawyers say the insurance
requirement goes hand in hand with the cover-
age guarantee and cap on premiums, and they
have asked the court to get rid of both if it nds
the mandate to be unconstitutional.
One scenario sends shivers through the health
care industry: The Supreme Court strikes down
the mandate only,and delegates other courts to
determine what else stays or goes.
Q:What happensif thecourtthrowsout only
theexpansionof theMedicaidprogram?
A: That would limit the laws impact severely be-
cause roughly half of the more than 30 million
peopleexpectedtogaininsuranceunder thelaw
would get it through the expansion of Medicaid,
the federal-state health insurance program for
low-income people.
But a potentially sizable number of those low-
income people still might be eligible for
government-subsidized private insurance under
other provisions. Private coverage is more ex-
pensive to subsidize than Medicaid.
States suing to overturn the federal law argue
that theMedicaidexpansioncomeswithsomany
strings attached it amounts to an unconstitu-
tional power grab by Washington. The
administration says the federal government will
pay virtually all the cost and says the expansion
is no different from ones that states have ac-
cepted in the past.
Who wins, loses pays?
Barack Obama
Mitt Romney
Eric Holder
Khalid
Aldawsari
LOCAL/NATION/WORLD 7
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
San Mateo County Office of Education
Career Technical Education
Taliban video shows
17 beheaded Pakistani soldiers
DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan The
Taliban released a video Wednesday that they
say shows the heads of 17 Pakistani soldiers
captured in a cross-border raid from
Afghanistan this week and beheaded.
In violence Wednesday, a bomb in a rail-
way station in Pakistans southwest killed at
least ve people, police said, and the leader of
an anti-Taliban militia was killed in Peshawar
in the northwest.
The Pakistani Talibans bloody cross-bor-
der raid Sunday night showed the threat still
posed by the group, despite multiple army
offensives. Increasingly, the militants have
used sanctuaries in eastern Afghanistan to
attack border areas in Pakistans northwest.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT Gunmen attacked a pro-gov-
ernment TV station Wednesday near the
Syrian capital, killing seven employees in the
latest barrage of violence as world powers
prepared for a high-level meeting that the U.S.
hopes will be a turning point in the crisis.
Invitations to Saturdays gathering in
Geneva were sent by special envoy Kofi
Annan to the ve permanent members of the
U.N. Security Council including Syrian
allies Russia and China but not to major
regional players Iran and Saudi Arabia.
The absence of those two countries, as well
as the lack of any appetite for international
military intervention, could make it difcult
for the group to nd the leverage to end the
bloodshed in Syria. An effort by Annan to bro-
ker a peace plan failed earlier this year.
Diplomatic hopes have rested on Russia
Syrias most important ally and protector
agreeing on a transition plan that would end
the Assad family dynasty, which has ruled
Syria for more than four decades. But
Moscow has rejected efforts by outside forces
to end the conict or any plan to force regime
change in Damascus.
The United Nations said Wednesday that
the conict, which began in March 2011 as
part of the Arab Spring that swept aside
entrenched leaders across the region, is
descending into sectarian warfare.
President Bashar Assad has so far appeared
largely impervious to world pressure and he
has warned the international community from
meddling in the crisis, which has seen a sharp
escalation in violence in recent months. He
said this week that his country is in a genuine
state of war, an increasingly common refrain
from the Syrian leader.
Assad denies there is any popular will
behind the uprising, which is in its 16th
month, saying terrorists are driving a foreign
conspiracy to destroy the country. Activists
say more than 14,000 people have been killed
in the violence.
Syria violence escalates as U.S. seeks turning point
By Alan Fram and Joan Lowy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Facing weekend dead-
lines for action, congressional leaders have
agreed to deals overhauling the nations
transportation programs without a
Republican provision forcing approval of the
proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline, and
avoiding a doubling of interest rates for new
student loans, congressional officials said
Wednesday.
The agreements underscored the pressures
both parties face to avoid angering voters and
facing embarrassing headlines in the run-up
to this Novembers presidential and congres-
sional elections. Letting road-building pro-
grams grind to a halt during an economic
downturn would be a blow to the image of
lawmakers, while
Democrats and
Republicans alike seemed
eager to avoid enraging
millions of students and
their parents by boosting
the costs of college loans.
In contrast, enactment
of the transportation
measure would create or
save 3 million jobs, said
Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., chief sponsor
of the Senate version of the bill. And the stu-
dent loan measure would spare an estimated
7.4 million students who get subsidized
Stafford loans beginning July 1 this
Sunday from facing $1,000 in higher inter-
est costs over the lives of their loans, which
typically take over a decade to repay.
Congressional leaders were planning to
combine the highway and student loan meas-
ures into a single bill to reduce potential pro-
cedural obstacles and hoped for nal approval
this week. Lawmakers would then leave
Washington for a July 4 recess.
The two-year highway bill would prevent
the governments authority to spend money
on highways, bridges and transit systems
from lapsing on Saturday, along with its abil-
ity to collect gasoline and diesel taxes. With
both parties checkmating each others top pri-
orities this campaign season, Democrats and
Republicans say the highway measure will be
Congress top job-creation initiative until the
November elections.
This is the jobs bill for the 112th
Congress, said House Transportation
Committee Chairman John Mica, R-Fla.
Lawmakers reach compromise on roads, student loans
Around the world
Barbara Boxer
REUTERS
Members of the Syrian Free Army are seen in Jisr al-Shughour.
LOCAL 8
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
T
he Burlingame Lions Club donated
$5,000 to the Burlingame Library
Foundation to help support the
Summer Childrens Reading Program.
The funds are from the Nancy Lechich
Memorial Trust, which is set up to help
support the childrens reading program as a
memorial to Nancy Lechich. Glenn
Mendelson, president of the Burlingame
Lions Club, presented the check to Pat
Harding, the Burlingame city librarian.
Lechich was the city librarian for many
years, and both he and his late wife, Nancy,
loved the Childrens Reading Program. This
past year it had 224 story times with more
than 10,000 children in total attendance.
Another popular program at the library is the
book buddies, which brings together a teen
and an elementary school student.
***
Congratulations to Mollie Stones. The
National Association for the Specialty
Food Trade, Inc. selected Mollie Stones
Markets as an Outstanding Specialty Food
Retailer of 2012. This award recognizes
only ve retailers nationwide each year for
excellence in customer service, product
sourcing, merchandising, quality assurance
and a passion for presenting top-quality
food.
Mollie Stones shows true commitment to
providing premium service, well-edited
choices of the latest new products and a deep
connection to its community that are hall-
marks of the specialty food industry, says
NASFT President Ann Daw.
Nominations for the award were made by
members of the NASFT, a nonprot associa-
tion of food artisans, entrepreneurs and
importers. Mollie Stones was selected as a
winner by a national panel of specialty food
experts including previous honorees, manu-
facturers, distributors and editors of
NASFTs Specialty Food Magazine.
Mollie Stones is featured in the May/June
issue of Specialty Food Magazine. Co-
founder and co-owner David Bennett
accepted the award June 18 at the Summer
Fancy Food Show in Washington, D.C., dur-
ing a ceremony hosted by chef and culinary
innovator Jose Andres.
***
Joelle Zamora-Clausen is the new post-
master in San Mateo, replacing the recently-
retired Bob Reed, according to the U.S.
Postal Service. She has been with the postal
service for nearly 30 years, starting as a clerk
in Denver, Colo. She was most recently the
manager of post ofce operations in Long
Beach.
***
Congrats to RethinkWastes Shoreway
Environmental Center in San Carlos. The
building has been certied LEED Gold by
the U.S. Green Building Council. LEED is
the nations preeminent program for the
design, construction and operation of high
performance green buildings.
***
Looking for a Chihuahua? How about
getting one for free and getting $10 in store
credit? This Saturday, from 11 a.m.-9 p.m.,
the Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA
will give $10 in the form of fun bucks to
be used in the societys retail store to any
visitors who adopt Chihuahuas or Chihuahua
mixes and allow all other adopters to set
their own adoption fee. This is the rst
adopt-a-thon since the PHS opened its
Center for Compassion at 1450 Rollins
Road in Burlingame in September. Pets cur-
rently awaiting new homes include more
than 70 cats and kittens, 45 dogs including
many toy breeds under 15 pounds, rabbits,
guinea pigs, reptiles and birds.
For more information visit www.phs-
spca.org.
***
A team of San Mateo County Transit
District employees who also manage
Caltrain recently raised nearly $12,000 to
prevent suicides. The team joined more than
2,000 people in the Out of the Darkness
Overnight, an 18-mile walk in San
Francisco to benet the American
Foundation for Suicide Prevention.
***
Did you enjoy Operation Eagle Visit this
Memorial Day in San Mateo? The parade
was fantastic but there may be some of you
who missed out in the Got the T-shirt
part. Now here is your chance. The city is
selling the shirts for $10 out of the City
Clerks Ofce at 330 W. 20th Ave. in San
Mateo. Available sizes are large, extra large
and extra extra large. Proceeds will be put
toward sending out holiday care packages to
San Mateos adopted troops. For more infor-
mation call the clerks ofce at 522-7040.
***
Mike Harvey Acura, Mike Harvey
Honda and Broadway Burlingame Self
Storage, Inc. just consolidated three separate
mortgages into one, low-rate loan offered by
the U.S. Small Business Administration
through the Small Business Jobs Act of
2010. Under the name Burlingame
Automotive Management in Burlingame,
Harvey will save hundreds of thousands of
dollars each year and x his occupancy costs
for the long term, according to a press
release from Bay Area Development
Company, which completed the renancing.
After serving with the Green Beret in
Vietnam, Harvey returned to the United
States and began his career in the car dealer-
ship business. After several years working
for other dealerships, he opened Mike
Harvey Acura in 1986 and Mike Harvey
Honda in 1989. Harvey opened Broadway
Burlingame Self Storage in 2011, using addi-
tional space located on his Acura dealer-
ships lot.
The reporters notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Thursday edition.
Reporters notebook
Sound high school budget gets OK
After ending the year with $7.28 million in
the bank, the Sequoia Union High School
District was planning the week of June 29,
2007 a year with the luxury of spending about
$1.5 million in one-time funds and maintain-
ing a 5 percent reserve. The $93 million budg-
et was $1.4 million more than the revenue
brought in causing the reserves to drop to $5.8
million or 4.57 percent. During the previous
school year, the district received money from
the state late in that year that made up the dif-
ference, explained Ed LaVigne, assistant
superintendent of administrative services.
Jail flushed with problems
A glut of orange jail jumpsuits, sheets and
garbage were reported the week of June 29,
2007 to be ushed down jail toilets, clogging
up the Redwood City sewer system and at
times ooding the Maguire Correctional
Facility.
The mixture clogged some pipes and owed
into sewer pumps. The exact motivation for the
fabric ushing was speculative but might have
been to escape punishment as well as cause
havoc at the jail. Inmates are issued one jump-
suit, a sweatshirt, two pairs of underwear and
sheets weekly during laundry night. The men
can be written up for having more items than
allowed.
SamTrans gets payment plan
A $53 million deal between San Mateo,
Santa Clara and San Francisco county transit
agencies was approved by the Metropolitan
Transportation Agency the week of June 29,
2007, ending a 16-year-old debt surrounding
the purchase of the rail right-of-way for pas-
senger service on the Peninsula.
From the archives highlights stories originally print-
ed ve years ago this week. It appears in the
Thursday edition of the Daily Journal.
OPINION 9
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CEO as governor
Editor,
In the June 16-17 weekend edition of
the Daily Journal, there is another letter
(A business is not a democracy)
responding to Harry Roussards asser-
tion that Meg Whitman would make a
good governor because of her business
expertise.
What no one has mentioned, but I
believe is very relevant, is the telling
difference between how Whitman is
turning HP around and how any gov-
ernor or president would turn around
our government. Whitman is eliminat-
ing about 30,000 employees and can do
it pretty much on her own; government
cannot do that.
Not only are we unable to reduce our
population, but we are also unable to
keep it from expanding and we are
unable get rid of those who are a detri-
ment to our society which is why
we have one of the largest prison popu-
lations in the country.
The purpose of business is to make a
prot so that CEOs and executives, like
Whitman, can earn big salaries and
bonuses. In a business, employees are
just overhead, like printer paper or
machinery. The purpose of government
is to serve its citizens, not itself.
Government is not intended to make a
prot; its job is to provide services
which we citizens cannot provide for
ourselves individually, such as police,
remen and highways.
Mike Slavens
San Mateo
Turning down card
room was a good decision
Editor,
I understand that one of your readers
claims that columnist Sue Lempert
never visited Hollywood Parks card
room (Bay Meadows comes to life in
the June 18 edition of the Daily
Journal).
I was San Mateos community devel-
opment director from 1987 to 2002. In
the early 1990s, when Bay Meadows
proposed a card room, I actually
accompanied Sue Lempert and other
councilmembers and city staff on the
visit to Hollywood Park, where we
toured not only the card room itself but
also the behind-the-scenes video moni-
tors. The council and staff, including
Sue and I, also participated in a series
of visits to other card rooms, including
a card room in the north county and at
least two card rooms in San Jose.
San Mateos voters made the right
decision in turning down the card
room. The visits made clear that the
prots made by card rooms are at the
expense of citizens who lose money
they often cannot afford.
Barbara Kautz
Tiburon
Letters to the editor
The Holland (Mich.) Sentinel
W
hatever the ruling, high
court wont have last word
on health care
No Supreme Court ruling since Bush
v. Gore has generated as much anticipa-
tion as the courts pending ruling on the
constitutionality of President Barack
Obamas landmark Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act. But however
the justices rule, we can be sure about
this: The court wont have the last word
on health care reform in America.
If the Supreme Court upholds the
entire law, or strikes down the individ-
ual mandate but lets the other parts of
the 906-page statute go into effect, the
laws full implementation is still far
from certain. Republicans in Congress
(and a possible Republican in the White
House) will continue ghting to repeal
it, though they might be pressured to
retain certain popular provisions, such
as the prohibition against denying cov-
erage for pre-existing conditions. But
many Democrats may even want to tin-
ker with the law, because so many of its
effects are uncertain. Will employers
drop employee health care plans, nd-
ing it cheaper to pay the federal penalty
than to continue offering coverage?
Will the new insurance exchanges cre-
ate real competition and affordable
options for consumers? Can the federal
government afford the increased num-
ber of people covered by the Medicare
system? Those are questions impossible
to answer in advance.
Americans want something better. An
Associated Press-GfK poll found that
while only 21 percent of respondents
supported the Affordable Care Act, 77
percent of those surveyed, including
majorities among all political persua-
sions, said they want Congress to start
working on a new reform law if the
current one is thrown out.
Regardless of the Supreme Courts
ruling, we have to nd something bet-
ter.
The Affordable Care Act
Open (Face)book
G
o ahead, colleges and employers. Ask me my
social media user name. Demand my passwords.
I dare you.
When you do, youll be sorely disappointed. Maybe you
were expecting me to reluctantly give in. Maybe you
thought Id toss out some legal jargon about personal
rights. Perhaps you antici-
pated a very curt Go stuff
it.
Instead, youll be told that
I dont have them to give.
Thats right, boys and
girls. I am one of the few
people on the planet without
a Facebook page. No pok-
ing, no liking, no worries
about how to deny a
friend request from
annoying acquaintances, no
endless alerts that some-
body has written on my
wall or posted the latest
video of cats, no fretting
that the wrong eyes will see the wrong photos or regrets
about putting hands to keyboard after too many glasses of
cabernet. I am blissfully anti-social.
I admit a Twitter account. I joined a few years back fig-
uring Id better snap up my name before somebody else
with the same moniker took hold or some cyber-squatter
began pretending to be me while Tweeting inappropriate
comments about farm animals and political wonks. Before
everybody grows too excited, let it be said Ive never actu-
ally used the account. The couple of souls who signed up
as followers must wonder where in the heck Im leading
them because I have yet to go anywhere (figuratively
speaking).
Other than that, Im a non-entity in the world of social
media. No Foursquare, no Tumblr, no Pinterest. OK,
maybe I did sign up to look at everybody elses boards but
I cant really recall. Its been a while. Theres only so
many Pinterest collages one can properly take in.
I dont even post reviews on Yelp. Of course, if I did, Id
share high marks for the social media privacy bills touted
by Assemblywoman Nora Campos, D-San Jose, and San
Mate Countys own senator, Leland Yee. The prohibitions
on requests for user names and passwords arent a done
deal but are certainly a step in the right direction.
But there is still one question why do we even need
these laws? Why do businesses and educational facilities
think it appropriate to demand the information from stu-
dents, employees and job applicants? File this one under
dumb-dumb-dumb. Employers are not allowed to consider
tidbits like marital status, sexual orientation and religion in
their hiring decision so why even give them the insight?
Goodness knows albums of well-liquored vacations and
flashed body parts isnt going to send anybody the mes-
sage Hire me! Im responsible! On one hand, I can see
why a potential employer or admissions officer might want
a hint or two if the person they bring on board will reflect
poorly on the organization or display the common sense of
a Jell-O mold. But just as they also dont get to unlock the
diaries, replicate the Spanish Inquisition with relatives or
look at medical records, these hirers and institutions have
to stick with the archaic methods of interviews, resumes
and good ol gut feeling.
On the flip side, those worried that their social media
sites make them look like a dim-witted loon who cant
string two words together and lives for body shots might
want to reconsider their content.
Sometimes the most amazing thing isnt what people
choose to share but how widely they choose to share it. A
reporter at a different publication several years ago used to
tweet her unsavory opinions about sources she interviewed
for stories. Oops.
Chances are if an employer does a quick search on an
applicants name, they wont even need to ask for pass-
words to learn what John and Jane Doe are like in their
off-hours.
Even when the privacy settings are in place, hackers
have widely distributed very personal photos of spokes-
people in response to controversial situations. Hard lesson
nothing is ever completely secure out in cyberspace.
But applicants for jobs and enrollment should have the
security that they will not be asked to hand over names
and passwords.
That said, the best solution might just be avoiding the
social media frenzy all together. That way, when asked,
there is no problem being an open book.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200
ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to
the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com
Other voices
The Daily Sentinel,
Grand Junction, Colo.
M
ost Americans no doubt
learned that the U.S.
Supreme Court struck down
key provisions of Arizonas controver-
sial immigration law on a 5-3 vote. Or
they may have heard the court upheld
one of the most signicant portions of
the law.
Depending on their political per-
spective and views on immigration,
they may curse the court for its liber-
alism and its acceptance of the
claims of the Obama administration.
Or they might blast the court for its
right-wing ways and its willingness
to uphold states rights, even if they
lead to racial profiling.
But Americans of all political persua-
sions should applaud the courts careful
consideration of this issue and its
refusal to simply accept what either
side was saying as gospel.
In fact, the Roberts Court, like its
predecessors, is doing exactly what is
expected of the judicial branch of gov-
ernment. It has acted as a neutral arbiter
of what passes constitutional muster,
not as a partisan cheerleader.
Evidence of this is in the vote split.
While the main decision was the 5-3
vote, conservative Chief Justice John
Roberts and frequent swing vote Justice
Anthony Kennedy both sided with the
more liberal members of the court to
reach the majority.
Also, the three dissenting justices
each wrote separate opinions, explain-
ing that they dissented on different
parts of the main decision, and for dif-
ferent reasons.
However, the court sent a warning to
Arizona authorities, saying there could
be further litigation if the law is used to
allow harassment or unreasonable
detention of people for minor crimes
or... creating new crimes for immigrants
who fail to carry appropriate documents
or who seek work when they are here
illegally were pre-empted by federal
immigration law.
Arizonas immigration law
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
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accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
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choose to reect the diverse character of this
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,627.01 +0.74% 10-Yr Bond 1.62 -0.43%
Nasdaq2,875.32 +0.74% Oil (per barrel) 80.410004
S&P 500 1,331.84998 +0.90%Gold 1,575.20
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A rare double shot of good news about
the U.S. economy sent stocks strongly
higher Wednesday. The Dow Jones
industrial average rose 92 points despite
lingering fear about Europes debt tur-
moil.
Americans signed more contracts to
buy previously occupied homes in May,
matching the fastest pace in two years,
the National Association of Realtors
said. It was the latest signal that the
housing market is improving in many
regions following a slump of more than
six years.
Homebuilders soared. Lennar Corp.
jumped $1.31, or 5 percent, to $28.70.
That company had reported earlier that
its second-quarter prot rose as it boost-
ed deliveries and new orders.
PulteGroup, D.R. Horton and
Hovnanian Enterprises also rose sharply.
Earlier, the government said that busi-
nesses placed more orders for long-last-
ing manufactured goods in May, sug-
gesting that their condence in the U.S.
economy was not shaken by signs of
weakness that emerged this spring. Core
goods, a measure of business investment
plans, also jumped.
The reports were really quite good,
boosting hopes about the economic
recovery after three months of weak out-
put and abysmal job growth, said Dennis
Gartman, an economist and editor of The
Gartman Letter, a source of daily market
commentary.
The economy is doing reasonably
well and will continue to muddle on
through, Gartman said.
The Dow closed up 92.34 points, or
0.7 percent, at 12,627.01. Coca-Cola
rose $1.26, or 2 percent, to $76.34, after
saying it will invest another $3 billion in
Indias rapidly growing consumer mar-
ket over the next eight years.
The Standard & Poors 500 index rose
11.86 points, or 0.9 percent, to 1,331.85.
Its biggest loser by far was auto parts
maker OReilly Automotive, which fell
$13.83, or 14 percent, to $82.61.
OReilly said its second-quarter earnings
will be at the low end of its earlier esti-
mates and sales will be weaker than pre-
viously expected.
H&R Block leapt 58 cents, or 4 per-
cent, to $15.67. The tax preparation
company posted a lower fourth-quarter
prot than analyst had expected, but the
company gained valuable market share
while cutting jobs and closing stores to
focus on electronic tax ling.
The Nasdaq composite average rose
21.26 points to 2,875.32.
Investors remain wracked with con-
cern about Europe as leaders there pre-
pare for a two-day summit aimed at
defusing their lingering debt crisis.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel
warned Wednesday that there would be
no quick solution to the structural issues
plaguing the continent.
Europe will cause volatile stock trad-
ing in the coming weeks because the
summit is unlikely to produce a lasting
solution, Gartman said. The meeting is
scheduled to be two days, he said, but
Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti
promised to keep it going until Sunday if
an agreement has not been reached.
I think he can keep them there until
Sunday ve weeks from now and theres
little chance theyll agree, Gartman
said.
Stocks rise sharply
Wall Street
Google sells small tablet, challenges Kindle Fire
SAN FRANCISCO Google is unveiling a small tablet
computer bearing its brand in a challenge to Amazons
Kindle Fire.
The Nexus Seven is designed specically for Google
Play, the online store that sells movies, music, books, apps
and other content the things Amazon.com Inc. also sells
for its tablet computer.
Both tablets have screens that measure 7 inches diago-
nally, smaller than the nearly 10 inches on Apple Inc.s
popular iPad. The Nexus Seven will also be light at
about 0.75 pound, compared with the Kindle Fires 0.9
pound. The iPad weighs 1.44 pounds.
The Nexus Seven will ship in mid-July starting at $199
the same price as the Kindle Fire. By contrast, iPads
start at $499. Customers can start ordering it through
Google on Wednesday, initially in the U.S., Canada and
Australia.
The Nexus Seven will run the next version of Google
Inc.s Android operating system, called Jelly Bean.
With Page voiceless,
Brin appears at Google show
SAN FRANCISCO Google co-founder Sergey Brin
made a splashy entrance during a San Francisco confer-
ence while CEO Larry Page recovered from an ailment
that has left him unable to speak.
Pages absence from one of Googles marquee events
wasnt a surprise because the Internet search leader had
announced at its annual shareholders meeting last week
that he wouldnt be attending.
Without providing any specics about what caused the
problem, Google Inc. said Page lost his voice. Although
Page still is well enough to carry out his CEO duties, Page
isnt expected to speak during a conference call planned
next month to review the companys second-quarter earn-
ings.
Brin told reporters Wednesday that Page is ne except
for his inability to speak, which started a few weeks ago.
Business briefs
By Jonathan Fahey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK ExxonMobil CEO
Rex Tillerson says fears about climate
change, drilling, and energy dependence
are overblown.
In a speech Wednesday, Tillerson
acknowledged that burning of fossil
fuels is warming the planet, but said
society will be able to adapt. The risks of
oil and gas drilling are well understood
and can be mitigated, he said. And
dependence on other nations for oil is
not a concern as long as access to supply
is certain, he said.
Tillerson blamed a public that is illit-
erate in science and math, a lazy
press, and advocacy groups that manu-
facture fear for energy misconceptions
in a speech at the Council on Foreign
Relations.
He highlighted that huge discoveries
of oil and gas in North America have
reversed a 20-year decline in U.S. oil
production in recent years. He also trum-
peted the global oil industrys ability to
deliver fuels during a two-year period of
dramatic uncertainty in the Middle East,
the worlds most important oil and gas-
producing region.
No one, anywhere, any place in the
world has not been able to get crude oil
to fuel their economies, he said.
In his speech and during a question-
and-answer session after, he addressed
three major energy issues: Climate
change, oil and gas drilling pollution,
and energy dependence.
Tillerson, in a break with predecessor
Lee Raymond, has acknowledged that
global temperatures are rising. Clearly
there is going to be an impact, he said
Wednesday.
But he questioned the ability of cli-
mate models to predict the magnitude of
the impact. He said that people would be
able to adapt to rising sea levels and
changing climates that may force agri-
cultural production to shift.
We have spent our entire existence
adapting. Well adapt, he said. Its an
engineering problem and there will be an
engineering solution.
Andrew Weaver, chairman of climate
modeling and analysis at the University
of Victoria in Canada, disagreed with
Tillersons characterization of climate
modeling. He said modeling can give a
very good sense of the type of climate
changes that are likely. And he said
adapting to those changes will be much
more difficult and disruptive than
Tillerson seems to be acknowledging.
Steve Coll, author of the recent book
Private Empire: ExxonMobil and
American Power, said he was sur-
prised Exxon would already be talking
about ways society could adapt to cli-
mate change when there is still time to
try to avoid its worst effects. Also, he
said, research suggests that adapting to
climate change could be far more
expensive than reducing emissions
now.
Exxons CEO: Energy fears overblown
By Matthew Perrone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The Food and
Drug Administration has approved
Arena Pharmaceuticals anti-obesity pill
Belviq, the rst new prescription drug
for long-term weight loss to enter the
U.S. market in over a decade.
Despite only achieving modest weight
loss in clinical studies, the drug
appeared safe enough to win the FDAs
endorsement, amid calls from doctors
for new weight-loss treatments.
The agency cleared the pill
Wednesday for adults who are obese or
are overweight with at least one medical
complication, such as diabetes or high
cholesterol. The drug should be used in
combination with a healthy diet and
exercise.
Obesity Society President Patrick
ONeil said hes encouraged by the
drugs approval because it underscores
the notion that lifestyle changes alone
are not enough to treat obesity.
This is good news because it tells us
that the FDA is indeed treating obesity
seriously, said ONeil, who teaches at
Medical University of South Carolina
and was the lead researcher on several
studies of Belviq. On the other hand,
its not the answer to the problem or
even a big part of the answer.
Even if the effects of Belviq are sub-
tle, experts say it could be an important
rst step in developing new treatments
that attack the underlying causes of obe-
sity.
The way these things tend to work is
you have some people who do extreme-
ly well and other people dont lose any
weight at all. But if we had 10 medicines
that were all different and worked like
this, we would have a real eld, said Dr.
Louis Aronne, director of the weight loss
program at Weill-Cornell Medical
College.
FDA clears first new weight-loss pill
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The Wall Street
analysts who know Facebook best are
giving the companys stock a mixed
review. Think: like, not love.
A flood of analyst reports from 33
banks gave Facebooks stock a mix of
Neutral and Buy ratings on
Wednesday. And there was at least one
review that equated to a Sell rating.
It marked the end of the 40-day quiet
period following Facebooks initial
public offering. Analysts at banks that
led the IPO were finally allowed to
give public opinions on the stock,
offering the first glimpse of what the
IPOs underwriters really think about
Facebook.
Facebooks much-ballyhooed IPO
landed with a thud on May 18, with the
stock closing just 23 cents above its
$38 IPO price. It hasnt fared much
better since. On Wednesday, it fell $87
cents, or 2.6 percent, to close at
$32.23.
Morgan Stanley, the lead bank in the
IPO, gave a $38 target price for
Facebooks stock over the next 12
months. Thats the same as the IPO
price Facebook has failed to match
since its first day of trading. The ana-
lyst, Scott Devitt, said Facebook has
long-term opportunities in mobile
advertising despite recent concerns.
Facebook slides as underwriters give mixed ratings
<< As slip past Mariners, page 15
Phelps tops Lochte in 200 free, page 15
Thursday, June 28, 2012
NATIONAL ATTENTION: LOCAL GYMS ARE PUMPED U.S. GYMNASTICS OLYMPIC TRIALS ARE IN SAN JOSE >>> PAGE 13
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Belmont resident turned Washington
University Huskie Max Mannisto has lost that
losing feeling.
Winning as much as he has over the last
three years will do that.
Knock on wood, I havent lost a race since
I got to Washington, Mannisto said. Second
place, it scares me. I want to keep going, I
dont want to lose a race, I want to keep this
streak of never having lost at Washington. I
get these huge butteries in my stomach just
at the thought of getting second.
The only thing oating in his stomach earli-
er this month was joy as Mannisto and his
Washington crew team dominated the 2012
IRA Championships on the Cooper River in
Cherry Hill, N.J. The Huskies team went 5 for
5 in their races in capturing their 15th IRA
Championship and their sixth straight. Since
the IRA began hosting ve events (varsity
eight, second varsity eight, freshmen eight,
varsity four and open four), no crew had
swept all ve.
We had a hell of a weekend in early June,
Mannisto said. This year was pretty special
for us. We were denitely favored to win but
going in wed only raced one East Coast crew,
that being Brown, and most of the teams are
out back East. Its all business but its still fun.
Going into it, Im going to be honest, I was
really nervous. Youre sitting there at the start-
ing line, six boats across, and the announcer is
just dead serious, four minutes and youre
just breathing deeply, Alright alright, its
going to come, its going to go. Its going to
be alright you just gotta do what you do in
practice.
Nerves aside, Mannisto and his second var-
sity team put on a show. They won their race
in 5:31.616, a good two seconds ahead of
Brown. They overcame a surge halfway
through the race by the East Coast rival,
before sprinting ahead near the end for the
win.
The victory at the IRAs was extremely spe-
cial for Mannisto and the Huskies. Last
September, teammate William Peter Allen
died in a hiking accident.
We honored him by naming a boat after
him, Mannisto said. It was a really special
year because we were really racing for Peter.
On the varsity and JV eight, which is where I
race, we have a call in the middle of the race
specically for Pete were doing this for
Pete. Its also been a theme for the year, you
know, were out there for him. Hes with us
while were racing.
I was really pulling for some guys in my
boat, Mannisto said. Last year, their fresh-
men year, they would come in second, second,
second in major races. And for some of them,
it was really redemption against California
who kept beating up on them their freshmen
year. And for the seniors, there were some
who were going to go out 4 for 4, if we won
this, theyd have never lost a race.
That undefeated feeling is a familiar one at
Washington. And its one that drives Mannisto
to keep working.
I wouldnt say Im a completely nervous
Winning the norm for Mannisto
I
f Americans really want to get into the
sport of soccer, they better be tuning
in to the European championship
seminals Wednesday and Thursday, and
for sure catch the championship game
Sunday.
Because soccer is at its best at the highest
level. While many non-soccer fans simply
concentrate on the
score, its the buildup
to the scoring where
soccer really ourish-
es.
I know, you heard
time and time again,
appreciate the
nuances of the game.
It may sound clich,
but its true. In
Wednesdays semifi-
nal game between
Spain and Portugal, it
was easy to marvel at
the pinpoint passing and deft touches from
across the eld. Many think controlling a
pass from 40 yards away is easy. Its not.
Try it from 10 yards, while maintaining
your forward momentum. Or watch a
defender chase down a forward and cut off
angles to goal. The speed and dexterity of
the game at this level is hard to replicate.
Appreciate
greatness
I want to keep
this streak of
never having lost
at Washington. I
get these huge
butteries in my
stomach just at
the thought of
getting second.
Max Mannisto
PHOTO COURTESY OF DAN MANNISTO
Max Mannisto, who attendedSummit Prep in Redwood City, has not lost a race since joining
the University of Washington crew.
See LOUNGE, Page 14
See MANNISTO, Page 16
By Jerome Pugmire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DONETSK, Ukraine Still not pretty to
watch, still just as effective.
Spain again failed to dazzle at the European
Championship yet still advanced to its third
straight major championship nal, beating
Portugal 4-2 in a penalty shootout Wednesday
following a scoreless draw after extra time.
Were playing better in defense than what the
characteristics of our players would suggest,
Spain coach Vicente del Bosque said. Thats
what earns victories.
After earning plaudits for the eye-catching
one-touch passing that helped Spain win titles at
Euro 2008 and the 2010 World Cup, this years
team is struggling to create chances. Against
Portugal, the defending champions managed
only one quality shot in regulation time.
It didnt matter, though, because the Spanish
still came through when it mattered. Cesc
Fabregas, who came on as a substitute in the sec-
ond half, scored the deciding penalty after Bruno
Alves hit the crossbar for Portugal moments ear-
lier.
I played poorly, but the team worked really
hard, Fabregas said. I had this intuition that we
could advance if we went to penalties and thats
what we did.
Spain will next face either Germany or Italy
on Sunday in Kiev.
Being in another nal is a miracle, Fabregas
said. Its really incredible.
Spain to defend
European crown
REUTERS
Spains Cesc Fabregas celebrates his
game-winning goal in a penalty-kick
shootout win over Portugal. See SPAIN, Page 14
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Tim Lincecum won for the rst
time in nearly two months to end the worst drought of his
career, throwing four-hit ball over seven innings, and the San
Francisco Giants held the Dodgers scoreless for the third
straight game in a 3-0 win Wednesday.
Angel Pagan added an RBI single and drew a bases-loaded
walk to back Lincecum (3-8) as the Giants moved into a rst-
place tie in the NL West with just their second sweep of the
season and the rst time in franchise history shutting out
the Dodgers in a three-game series spanning 123 seasons.
Lincecum struck out eight and walked two while outpitch-
ing Chad Billingsley (4-7). The two-time NL Cy Young
Award winner ended a career-long 10-start winless stretch in
Lincecum punctuates sweep of Dodgers
See GIANTS, Page 14
Giants 3, Dodgers 0
Tim Lincecum
12
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Learn how Sutter Health is
improving the quality of life in your
community at thesutterstory.org
In 2011, Sutter Health provided
in free or discounted care for
patients without insurance and to
support community clinics,
medical research and health
education. Just one more measure
of our commitment to communities.
$
756 MILLION
SPORTS 13
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Christmas in June? Well, if youre a young
gymnast on the Peninsula, thats exactly how
today feels.
The United States gymnastics 2012
Olympic Trials roll into San Jose beginning
today with the mens preliminaries kicking off
four days of competition at the HP Pavilion.
The trials culminate on Sunday with the
announcement of the ve men and ve women
who will represent the U.S. in London come
July.
Here on the Peninsula, the buzz revolving
around the trials could not be bigger.
Theres a lot of excitement, said Sara
Valco, coach at South San Franciscos
Gymtowne Gymnastics. Especially since its
very competitive this year with the U.S. taking
ve gymnasts to the Olympics. Its going to be
really intense. We sold a lot of tickets here for
it.
Its very exciting [to have] the top gym-
nasts in the country in our back yard, said San
Mateo Gymnastics coach Armen Astoian.
For us, its like Christmas.
Local gyms have been prepping for months
leading up to the trials. At Gymtowne, world-
class gymnasts like Carly Patterson and
Nasthia Liukin paid the South San Francisco
gym a visit. At Peninsula Gymnastics in San
Mateo, Sam Peszek held a question and
answer session for over 70 youngsters and
signed autographs afterwards. And at San
Mateo Gymnastics, the excitement has
revolved around young Lacy Dagen, who had
a strong showing at the junior VISA national
championships earlier this summer.
A lot of our coaches and kids are volun-
teering to help and go watch the competition,
Astoian said. I think this is the best thing that
can happen to our area in the sense of gym-
nastics.
Some of the girls I coach are going, Valco
said. Im really excited because itll hopeful-
ly motivate them to work a little harder too.
Part of the fun for these local gymnasts is
getting to see their heroes up close and per-
sonal.
The kids know every one of them, Astoian
said. What theyve done, what theyve
accomplished. These are their dreams, their
stars, and ve of them are going to represent
the U.S. at the Olympics games thats very
exciting.
For the coaches and owners, the excitement
extends to the burst in popularity the sport will
receive immediately following the trials and
the Olympics.
Courtney Johnson, Program Director at
Peninsula Gymnastics, said that following the
2008 Olympic games, her gym experienced
about a 15 to 20 percent increase in September
enrollment a total of about 300 gymnasts.
We denitely got a huge increase in enroll-
ment afterwards, Valco said. I know at
Gymtowne, were expecting our numbers will
go up after the trials and after the Olympics. I
think our kids want to be like them and they
have to train for that.
Usually, every Olympic year a lot of new
girls and boys come to gymnastics, Astoian
said. Its a popular sport among the girls and
the boys are getting interested more, especial-
ly after Olympics years and watching them on
TV doing incredible things they get their
dreams up and hopes up and come join the
gym hoping some day to be there.
All the local coaches agree that for their
young gymnasts, its all about that Olympic
dream.
For the most part everyone works at the
gym with the dream of one day being an
Olympic champion or a world champion,
Astoian said. Of course every kid has a dif-
ferent ability and different skills but everyone
starts with that dream. But thats the rst
step into the sport to become an Olympic
gymnast.
The focus is slightly different at Peninsula
though, where Johnson said that perhaps refo-
cusing the dream is in a youngsters best inter-
est.
As a gym, we do focus on motivating our
gymnasts, but we remind them that most of
these Olympians have a college scholarship,
or attend a major school and a major [Division
I] program. Its denitely important for us to
keep them motivated, but in some respect,
have them get a college scholarship is just as
important.
Ultimately, the excitement of the trials
extends to gymnasts and coaches alike.
I think Im just really excited to see
because nobody knows whos going to make
the team, said Valco, who plans to attend the
competition over the weekend. Theyre try-
ing to piece the team together, but the girls that
are there this weekend are just so good. Its
just really exciting.
Local gymnasts excited about Olympic Trials
ASHLEY HANSEN
Olympic hopeful McKayla Maroney practices
on the uneven bars at HP Pavilion, site of the
2012 U.S. Olympic Trials.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WIMBLEDON, England Roger Federer
gave Prince Charles a bow, then gave Fabio
Fognini a royal thumping.
With the Prince of Wales visiting
Wimbledon for the rst time since 1970,
Federer was at his best Wednesday and beat
Fognini 6-1, 6-3, 6-2.
Federer, a six-time winner at the All
England Club, won 37 of 41 points on his rst
serve and 21 of 23 points at the net against
Fognini, an Italian ranked 68th.
Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall
sat in the rst row of the Royal Box as Federer
walked onto Centre Court for the days rst
match. He and Fognini stood side by side as
they bowed awkwardly toward the royals, and
Charles responded with a wave and grin.
They do brief you beforehand, Federer
said. I guess you dont do anything stupid.
You behave. Obviously we were asked to bow,
which is obviously no problem to do. Were
thrilled for the tennis family that they came to
watch Wimbledon today.
Shortly after Federers victory, rain inter-
rupted play, and the retractable roof on Centre
Court was closed for the rst time in the tour-
nament. Defending champion Novak
Djokovic won under the lights, beating
American Ryan Harrison 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 in the
nal match of the day, which nished at 9:52
p.m.
We went the distance, Djokovic said. Im
honored to be in a position to play on the most
recognized Centre Court worldwide in our
sport. Every time I step on Centre Court, you
can feel the different energy from any other
tournament.
Federer, Djokovic win at Wimbledon
SPORTS 14
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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EVERY
THURSDAY
THURS SDDAAA GHT GGGHT T H GGGHT T YY WINE NIGHT AAA THURSDAY WINE NIGHT
E V EV EV E E E E V VE VVV EV EVERR RRRRRRRR RRYYYYY Y YY RRRRR RRR
S S RS RS RS RS R R U UR U HU H H T TH TT T S SS SS S S U U URR RR R T T THH H HUU U SSS S RR R HH H DD DDD DD DDD DA AA A A DDDDAA AAAAA AAA AY YY AYYY AAY AAYYY Y A AA AAAA AAAA AA
EVERY
THURSDAY
Sure, soccer has its drawbacks: all the diving and opping,
and ultimately deciding a game with the unpredictable penalty-
kick shootout. The diving after fouls has become synonymous
with faking it akin to professional wrestling. But if you
watch closely enough, you will see many players are being
spiked with cleats on their lower legs, or bodies crashing into
each other at full speed as two players go up for a header.
Granted, the histrionics following a foul are probably not need-
ed, but it certainly doesnt feel good to have someone drive a
knee into your back or have cleats scrape down your leg.
It is said American sports fans are all about the event: the
Super Bowl, the World Series, NBA nals. You can put the
European soccer championship right up there with other must-
see sporting events.
Detractors will say soccer will never generate the passion it
does in the rest of the world until Americas best athletes stick
with soccer instead of abandoning the sport to focus on the
Big Three: football, basketball and baseball. Given the cur-
rent state of injury being highlighted in football specically,
perhaps Americas best will take a good, hard look at their ath-
letic future. Perhaps being mesmerized by the game of soccer
at its highest level will factor into their decision.
***
The various District 52 Little League tournaments begin
Friday and run through July 11. All tournaments are double
elimination, with the winners moving on to the Section 3 tour-
naments. District 52 includes 17 programs along the Peninsula.
The District 52 9-10 tournament is hosted by Pacica with
games held at Fairway Parks Piccolotti and Grasso elds.
Belmont/Redwood Shores captured both the district and sec-
tional titles in 2011, snapping Hillsboroughs two-year winning
streak.
The 10-11 All-Star tournament is hosted by Redwood City
with games played at Red Morton Park. Pacica Americans
win last season was the sixth different champion in as many
years.
The 11-12 tournament, also known as the Majors tourna-
ment, is the division that sends teams to the Little League
World Series in Pennsylvania at the end of the summer.
Highlands Park in San Carlos will host the District 52 tourna-
ment this year. Hillsborough won its fth straight Majors cham-
pion last season. The last non-Hillsborough team to win the
District 52 title was Palo Alto National in 2006.
The Little League summer all-star season kicked off last
week and concluded Tuesday with the Minors and Majors
Superbowl tournaments: essentially teams made up of the play-
ers not selected to a programs regular all-star team.
In the Minors Superbowl, Foster City ran the table in captur-
ing the title, winning ve straight games. It beat San Mateo
American 6-4 in the title game.
Pacica American also went unbeaten in capturing the
Majors Superbowl title, beating San Mateo National 4-3 in the
championship game. Pacica American won by 10-run mercy-
rule decisions in its rst three games of the tournament, allow-
ing just 10 runs while scoring 42.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone: 344-5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
which he went a career-worst 0-6.
His victory came one day shy of two months after his last
win, April 28 against San Diego.
The Freak got focused, and he just plain got mad about his
poor pitching. This outstanding outing helped the Giants get
back to rst place for the rst time since last Aug. 9.
Facing a depleted Dodgers lineup didnt hurt. Already miss-
ing All-Star Matt Kemp, the Dodgers lost Andre Ethier after
one at-bat to a left oblique injury.
Lincecum struck out two in a 1-2-3 second, and calmly
punched his pitching hand into his glove as he walked from the
mound back to the dugout. He also had gone 0-4 in his previ-
ous six starts against the Dodgers since his last victory on July
30, 2010.
The Dodgers were swept in the Bay Area for the second time
in as many weeks after losing three straight at Oakland from
June 19-21, scoring two total runs over the six games.
Melky Cabrera had an RBI double and Brandon Crawford
tripled among his three hits in San Franciscos rst three-game
sweep of the Dodgers at AT&T Park since July 30-Aug. 1,
2010.
Pitching to cheers of Come on, Timmy! Lincecum also
made a run-saving play that drew a standing ovation in the
third.
After Billingsley doubled off the wall in center for his sixth
hit in 25 at-bats this season, he moved to third on a wild pitch.
Lincecum threw another wild pitch that got past catcher
Hector Sanchez and reached the backstop. The pitcher covered
home, blocked the plate and tagged out Billingsley. His glove
was knocked loose, but Lincecum held onto it and made the
play with his left hand.
Lincecum allowed only one more baserunner past rst.
Sergio Romo recorded the nal four outs for his fourth save in
as many tries.
Lincecum came to the plate to roars from the sellout crowd
of 42,245 in the third and hit a one-out single down the left-
eld line. He scored on Cabreras double.
Buster Posey then walked to load the bases and Pagan
walked to force home a run, which brought pitching coach
Rick Honeycutt to the mound for a visit with Billingsley.
Lincecum, who settled down Friday at Oakland after falling
behind 3-0 in the rst inning and showed positive signs the
next four, ran his scoreless innings streak to 12.
Manager Bruce Bochy visited Lincecum after a seventh-
inning walk to A.J. Ellis put runners on rst and second with
one out, but drew cheers when Lincecum stayed in the game to
retire the next two batters in order.
He was caught for the second straight start by Sanchez.
The catcher landed hard on his left arm while making a div-
ing catch of a foul popup by Herrera for the rst out in the
fourth. Bochy and athletic trainer Dave Groeschner came out,
but Sanchez stayed in the game.
Lincecum struck out Dee Gordon to start the game, then
allowed a single to Jerry Hairston and walked Andre Ethier. He
then got Juan Rivera to ground into an inning-double play.
Ethier was removed before the bottom of the rst after injur-
ing his left oblique muscle, apparently while sliding into sec-
ond on the double-play ball.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
Cristiano Ronaldo had several chances for Portugal, but he
sent three shots well over the crossbar as his team held its own
for the entire match. The Real Madrid star, who came alive
with three goals in his last two matches at the tournament, did
not take a penalty in the shootout. He had been slated to take
the fth one, but it never got that far.
Our players trained and were prepared for a situation like
this, Portugal coach Paulo Bento said. We didnt have much
luck.
After an often dour opening 90 minutes, the match livened
up in the 30 minutes of extra time.
Spain midelder Andres Iniesta forced Portugal goalkeeper
Rui Patricio into a superb reex save in the 103rd minute.
Iniesta ghosted into the penalty area then held his head in dis-
belief as Rui Patricio reacted brilliantly to get a strong hand on
his shot after Jordi Alba cut the ball back toward the penalty
spot.
Rui Patricio made another ne save to deny substitute Jesus
Navas in the 111th.
Both teams were stronger in defense in the rst 90 minutes,
but that balance was broken in extra time, Spain coach
Vicente del Bosque said.
In the shootout, Xabi had the rst attempt saved by Rui
Patricio before Spain goalkeeper Iker Casillas saved Joao
Moutinhos shot. Iniesta, Gerard Pique and Sergio Ramos then
all scored for Spain, while Pepe and Nani answered for
Portugal.
The rst one wasnt so lucky, and then we scored the rest of
them, Casillas said. Yes, we really were lucky. Everything is
about luck sometimes.
Del Bosque ditched his unorthodox 4-6-0 formation for
Wednesdays match and opted for a traditional striker but
not the one many expected. Instead of Fernando Torres, it was
Alvaro Negredo that got the start up front. But 10 minutes into
the second half, Del Bosque replaced him with Fabregas.
I think we were better in the rst 90 minutes. Then in extra
time we were less efcient, Bento said. When we couldnt
take advantage of our opportunities, Spain got stronger.
Continued from page 11
SPAIN
SPORTS 15
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE Jarrod Parker struck out a
career-high nine in seven dominant innings,
Yoenis Cespedes and Coco Crisp homered for
Oaklands only two hits and the Athletics beat the
Seattle Mariners 2-1 on Wednesday.
Parker (4-3) allowed just three hits and walked
four. Hes allowed just two earned runs over his
last 20 innings pitched, going 2-0 in those three
outings, and lowering hiS ERA to 2.57.
Oakland closer Ryan Cook pitched around an
error and a walk in the ninth for his sixth save.
Hisashi Iwakuma (1-1) took the loss.
Seattle starter Kevin Millwood left the game
after just 2 2-3 innings after again straining his
right groin. After retiring Kurt Suzuki on a
grounder to shortstop, Mariners manager Eric
Wedge and trainer Rick Grifn visited Millwood
on the mound and decided to remove the veteran
and replace him with Iwakuma.
Millwood left the Mariners combined no-hit-
ter June 8 with a right groin strain after pitching
six innings. Though Millwood did not go on the
disabled list, he didnt pitch again until June 16
against San Francisco. The 37-year-old right-
hander is fourth among active pitchers with
2,642 2-3 innings pitched during his 15 major
league seasons.
Crisp hit the second pitch of the game just over
the right-eld wall for his second homer of the
year to give Oakland a 1-0 lead. Cespedes hit his
ninth home run in the seventh off Iwakuma.
Seattles John Jaso hit the rst pitch he saw in
the second inning for his third home run, tying
the score at 1. Parker walked Dustin Ackley and
Brendan Ryan, then advanced them with a wild
pitch. However, he nished his 29-pitch inning
by striking out Ichiro Suzuki.
Parker settled in afterward. He tied his career-
high of eight strikeouts in the fth by getting
Kyle Seager looking. Only Jaso gave him trou-
ble, reaching base three consecutive times, in his
seven innings.
Grant Balfour took over for Parker in the
eighth and allowed a one-out double to Seager.
Balfour retired Jesus Montero on a y ball to
center and Michael Saunders on a liner to short
to maintain the lead.
Oakland gets two hits, slips past Seattle
As 2, Mariners 1
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OMAHA, Neb. Round 2 goes to
Michael Phelps.
Getting back at rival Ryan Lochte,
Phelps stretched out to win a thrilling
200-meter freestyle at the U.S.
Olympic trials Wednesday night, set-
ting up a duel in London that just gets
more tantalizing with every race
between the worlds two greatest swim-
mers.
Lochte won the 400 individual med-
ley on the opening night of the games,
his third straight major victory over the
winningest Olympian ever. But Phelps
isnt going down that easily.
He got off to a stronger start that
usual, leading at the rst turn and hold-
ing the advantage through all four laps.
Both swimmers got a big boost off the
nal turn, cutting through the water like
missiles, and Lochte went stroke for
stroke down the stretch. But Phelps
stretched out his right arm at the wall,
touching just ahead of Lochte. The
winning time was 1 minute, 45.70 sec-
onds ve-hundredths of a second
ahead of Lochte.
Phelps victory was even more
impressive given his busy night. He
didnt even have time to celebrate, hus-
tling back to the warm-down pool to
get ready for the seminals of the 200
buttery. He came back 40 minutes
later to post the third-fastest qualifying
time, moving on to Thursday nights
nal looking to lock up a chance to
defend the gold he won at the last two
Olympics.
Round 2 goes to Phelps, beats Lochte in 200 free
16
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 42 30 .583
Atlanta 40 34 .541 3
New York 40 36 .526 4
Philadelphia 36 41 .468 8 1/2
Miami 35 40 .467 8 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 41 33 .554
Pittsburgh 39 35 .527 2
St. Louis 40 36 .526 2
Milwaukee 34 41 .453 7 1/2
Houston 32 43 .427 9 1/2
Chicago 26 49 .347 15 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 43 33 .566
San Francisco 43 33 .566
Arizona 37 37 .500 5
Colorado 28 45 .384 13 1/2
San Diego 27 49 .355 16
WednesdaysGames
Milwaukee 8, Cincinnati 4
N.Y. Mets 17, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 0
Pittsburgh 11, Philadelphia 7
Atlanta 6, Arizona 4
Miami 5, St. Louis 3
Houston 1, San Diego 0
Washington at Colorado, late
ThursdaysGames
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 8-2) at Philadelphia
(K.Kendrick 2-7), 10:05 a.m.
Washington (E.Jackson 4-4) at Colorado (Outman
0-3), 12:10 p.m.
Arizona (Bauer 0-0) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 1-2), 4:10
p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 3-3) at Houston (Keuchel 1-
0), 5:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (C.Young 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano
9-2), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto9-3) at SanFrancisco(Bumgarner
9-4), 7:15 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 46 28 .622
Baltimore 41 33 .554 5
Boston 40 35 .533 6 1/2
Tampa Bay 40 35 .533 6 1/2
Toronto 38 37 .507 8 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 40 35 .533
Cleveland 37 37 .500 2 1/2
Detroit 36 38 .486 3 1/2
Kansas City 34 39 .466 5
Minnesota 30 44 .405 9 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 46 29 .613
Los Angeles 42 33 .560 4
Oakland 37 39 .487 9 1/2
Seattle 32 45 .416 15
WednesdaysGames
N.Y.Yankees 5, Cleveland 4
Chicago White Sox 12, Minnesota 5
Boston 10,Toronto 4
Kansas City 5,Tampa Bay 4
Oakland 2, Seattle 1
L.A. Angels 13, Baltimore 1
Detroit at Texas, late
ThursdaysGames
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 9-2), 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 1-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 7-
3), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Haren 5-7) at Toronto (Cecil 1-0), 4:07
p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 6-5) at Tampa Bay (Shields 7-4),
4:10 p.m.
Oakland (T.Ross 2-7) at Texas (Feldman 1-6), 5:05
p.m.
Boston (F.Morales 1-1) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 5-5),
7:10 p.m.
Fridays Games
Chicago White Sox at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
@Nats
3:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/3
@WCaps
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/22
vs.Fire
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/28
vs.Galaxy
7p.m.
ESPN2
6/30
@Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
@FCDallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/7
vs.RSL
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
vs. Reds
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/1
vs.FCDallas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
@Rangers
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/1
@Rangers
4:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/30
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
D.C. 9 4 3 30 29 19
Kansas City 9 4 2 29 20 15
New York 8 4 3 27 28 22
Chicago 7 5 3 24 20 19
Houston 5 5 5 20 20 23
Columbus 5 5 4 19 14 15
New England 5 7 3 18 20 20
Montreal 5 8 3 18 24 26
Philadelphia 3 8 2 11 12 15
Toronto FC 1 10 2 5 13 28
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose 10 3 3 33 31 19
Real Salt Lake 10 5 2 32 28 19
Vancouver 7 4 5 26 18 19
Seattle 7 5 4 25 19 16
Los Angeles 6 8 2 20 22 23
Colorado 6 8 1 19 21 21
Chivas USA 5 7 4 19 11 18
Portland 4 6 4 16 14 17
FC Dallas 3 9 5 14 16 26
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesdays Games
Toronto FC 3, Montreal 0
Fridays Games
Chicago at Sporting Kansas City, 5 p.m.
Saturdays Games
New York at Toronto FC, 4 p.m.
Montreal at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Columbus, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
Portland at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, July3
Chicago at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
San Jose at Portland, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July4
Sporting Kansas City at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 6 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 6:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at Real Salt Lake, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
vs.RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/2
@Nats
8:05a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/4
vs.RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
vs. RedSox
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/4
@Nats
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/5
vs. Reds
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/28
vs. Reds
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/29
@Rangers
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/28
vs. Reds
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/30
@Rangers
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
National League
BATTINGRuiz, Philadelphia, .364;
DWright, New York, .357; Votto, Cincinnati,
.353; MeCabrera, San Francisco, .351; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, .342; CGonzalez,
Colorado, .331; Prado, Atlanta, .317.
HITSMeCabrera, San Francisco, 106;
Bourn, Atlanta, 98; DWright, New York, 94;
SCastro,Chicago,93;McCutchen,Pittsburgh,
91; CGonzalez, Colorado, 90; Prado, Atlanta,
90; Votto, Cincinnati, 90.
HOME RUNSBeltran, St.Louis, 20; Braun,
Milwaukee, 20; Bruce, Cincinnati, 17; CGon-
zalez,Colorado,17; Stanton,Miami,17; Hart,
Milwaukee, 15; LaRoche,Washington, 15.
American League
BATTINGTrout, Los Angeles, .344; Kon-
erko,Chicago,.333;Beltre,Texas,.328;Mauer,
Minnesota, .321; Hamilton, Texas, .317;
AEscobar,Kansas City,.315;Trumbo,Los An-
geles, .313.
HITSJeter, New York, 95; MiCabrera, De-
troit,91; Beltre,Texas,90; Cano,New York,88;
AdJones, Baltimore, 88; Andrus, Texas, 86;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 86.
HOME RUNSBautista, Toronto, 25;
ADunn,Chicago,24; Hamilton,Texas,24; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 22; Granderson, New
York, 21; Ortiz, Boston, 21; AdJones, Balti-
more, 19.
BASEBALL LEADERS
BASEBALL
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKSRecalled LHP
Patrick Corbin from Reno (PCL). Reinstated INF
Stephen Drew from the 15-day DL. Placed RHP
Daniel Hudson on the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
Jonathan Albaladejo to Reno.
CHICAGOCUBSRecalled RHP Rafael Dolis from
Iowa (PCL). Designated RHP Randy Wells for as-
signment.
COLORADOROCKIESOptioned RHP Zach Put-
nam to Colorado Springs (PCL). Recalled LHP
Edwar Cabrera from Tulsa (Texas).
PHILADELPHIAPHILLIESReinstated 2B Chase
Utley from the 15-day DL. Optioned 2B Michael
Martinez to Lehigh Valley (IL).
PITTSBURGHPIRATESDesignated LHP Doug
Slaten for assignment. Claimed 2B Oscar Tejeda
off waivers from Boston and optioned him to Al-
toona (EL).
NBA
HOUSTONROCKETSTraded C Samuel Dalem-
bert, the 2012 14th overall draft pick, a future
second-round draft pick and cash considerations
to Milwaukee for F Jon Brockman, F Jon Leuer, G
Shaun Livingston and the 2012 12th overall pick.
INDIANAPACERSAnnounced the resignation
of president of basketball operations Larry Bird.
NFL
SEATTLESEAHAWKSPromoted Sam Ramsden
to director of player health and performance.
Named Todd Brunner area scout for the northeast
region.
MLS
COLUMBUSCREWWaived D Shaun Francis, D
Aubrey Perry and D Korey Veeder.
TRANSACTIONS
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS MLS STANDINGS
person, he said. I mean, you get those but-
teries before the race. We were undefeated
up until then but anything can [happen], some-
one could have a burst of speed and it just one
of those things where you want to carry on
that undefeated season.
Winning still definitely feels awesome
every single time. We crossed that nish line
at IRAs and it was unreal. Its still unreal, just
like freshman year. Its the biggest high you
can imagine. Youre just on top of the world.
Right now, Mannisto hopes his rowing will
take him around the world. Hes partaking in
an Under-23 World Championship trial where
the winners advance to compete in Lithuania.
Mannistos victories extend outside the
water too. He made the Deans List during the
winter and spring quarter and was named to
the Pac-12 Academic Team.
Its nice to know that someone else, other
than my coaches, recognize me for academic
success, not just rowing success, Mannisto
said. Its denitely a balancing act between
rowing and going to school. Rowing is like a
job. It consumes my whole day. Its tough. I
like the full schedule, it keeps me active, it
keeps me on my toes.
Continued from page 11
MANNISTO
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON, N.J. Finding the right nursing
home for an elderly loved one is a daunting
task. And its one most of us will face, as two-
thirds of people over 65 will need nursing home
care, at least temporarily, according to AARP.
Its best if you can research facilities in
advance, but thats not always possible. A sud-
den illness or injury may force you to confront
these concerns sooner than you expect.
Either way, here are several key considera-
tions:
STAY CLOSE
The biggest inuence on the quality of care
nursing home patients receive is often the fre-
quency of visits by friends and family. Make
sure youll be allowed to visit when you want
from early morning to late evening to t
your schedule and enable you to monitor care at
different times.
Once your loved one is in a nursing home,
drop by frequently, sometimes without notice.
In the afternoon, see whether residents are
enjoying interesting activities together or
watching TV alone. At meal times, note how
much your mom or dad eats. Stay late some-
times. After your loved one has fallen asleep,
remain until he or she wakes up to go to the
bathroom. If no one responds quickly to a ring
for assistance, thats a serious problem, says
Amy Goyer, AARPs caregiving expert and
blogger. Residents forced to get up and go by
themselves risk serious injury.
GET REFERENCES
There are several sources for referrals. Your
local Area Agency on Aging or hospital dis-
charge planners can provide listings of nearby
nursing homes. Medicare caseworkers, at (800)
MEDICARE, also can help.
Stick to facilities certied by Medicare.
Theyre inspected every year, and any com-
plaints are investigated. Read recent inspection
reports, usually available through the state
health department. One patient accident isnt a
big deal, but frequent reports of patient falls, bed
sores and the like are a red ag, says Edward
Mortimore, director of nursing home evalua-
tions at CMS, the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services.
The CMS website provides a tool to help
users compare nursing homes. The site includes
links to its ve-star ratings system, complaints
against nursing homes, links to local ombuds-
men and other health advocates, a detailed guide
to choosing a nursing home and much more;
visit www.medicare.gov/quality-care-nder .
CHECK ON STAFFING
No matter how dedicated individual employ-
ees are, if there arent enough, care suffers.
Check the ratio of aides to patients. CMS
requires each patient have a daily minimum of
2.8 hours of nursing aide time and 1.3 hours
with an RN or licensed practical nurse.
Ask specic questions about care. Can your
mom keep her current doctor? Who decides
whether to change your dads medicine and will
you be notied rst? Whats the policy on han-
dling patients who get agitated or aggressive, as
can happen with Alzheimers patients?
Also be sure to ask about how the staff will
deal with the unexpected: a power loss, natural
disaster or other situation that would require an
evacuation. Some nursing homes arent fully
prepared.
SCOPE IT OUT
Visit each nursing home youre considering
and take notes. Snoop around and beware
anyplace that objects. Check resident rooms for
cheerfulness and safety. Use the bathroom to see
if theres enough hot water. Inspect the kitchen
for cleanliness.
Note the atmosphere. Are patients smiling? Is
it peaceful? Does it smell pleasant and homey?
Stay for a meal with residents, usually for a
nominal cost. Is the food appetizing? Are resi-
dents enjoying the meal? Ask how kitchen staff
handles dietary restrictions and whether they
will cut up food for those with difculty swal-
lowing.
Once youve narrowed your choice down to
two or three facilities, bring along your loved
one if he or she is physically and mentally up to
it. If not, show pictures and discuss why you
favor a particular home. Allow the person to feel
they have some control so theyll buy in.
CONSIDER COSTS
For most families, cost is a key factor. Last
year, a semi-private room ranged from an aver-
age $46,355 in Texas up to $222,285 in Alaska.
For average costs by state, go to:
www.aarp.org/relationships/caregiving/info-
07-2011/nursing-home-care-cost.html .
To control costs, determine if its possible to
keep your loved one at home longer through a
combination of family help, health aides and
adult day care. If a move is years away, consid-
er getting long-term care insurance.
Tips to pick the best nursing home
Once your loved one is in a nursing home, drop by frequently, sometimes without notice.
18
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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presented an overview of the principles for
the program.
We believe in public education, said
Burgess Peck, one of the founders, who
added Connect would be an additional com-
munity model that mirrors the districts
diversity.
Alicia Yamashita, a mother of two who
has taught elementary school with a focus
on English learners, explained the curricu-
lum is created to encourage and engage
learners. Teachers, she said, will act as facil-
itators guiding students through lessons and
real-life applications of their studies.
Financially, Founder Scott Smith said the
group is working on establishing a variety
of funding options. And, the leadership
model includes a board of directors that
works with an advisory board. Leadership is
an important part of the process, said
founder Kathryn Hopkins. The proposal
calls for a shared leadership model. The
hope is to create a catalyst of innovation to
create a ripple effect that impacts the rest of
the district and outside schools, she said.
Connects program calls for integrating
social and emotional learning. The program
would allow children to build a relationship
with teachers by having students work with
the same teacher for two consecutive years.
Daily curriculum would include visual arts
and physical education. Opportunities for
hands-on service learning with the commu-
nity would be offered. Connect would par-
ticipate in mandated state tests and include
a teacher-led professional learning commu-
nity through a shared governance model.
As proposed, Connect Community
Charter School founders aims to open in the
2013-14 school year with 25 students in
kindergarten, first and second grades and 50
students in sixth grade. In the years to come,
one grade would be added to the elementary
and middle school section until the fourth
school year, 2016-17, when the campus
would be at capacity with 300 students.
Currently, the district does not have any
charter schools.
Previously, Garfield School was a charter
school sponsored by the Redwood City
Elementary School District. It was the
states 49th charter school in 1994. In
February 2009, the Garfield Charter Board
voted unanimously not to renew the schools
charter and return to the district.
At the same meeting, the board discussed
how to use Measure W funds.
Earlier this month, voters in the district
passed Measure W, a five-year, $67 annual
parcel tax to support school programs.
Measure W will generate approximately
$1.4 to $1.7 million, depending on the num-
ber of eligible exemption applications filed.
Options include supporting libraries, pro-
tecting programs that support math, science,
reading and writing, and retaining teachers,
according to the bond language. The board
gave direction to give each site some free-
dom in deciding how to use the portion of
funds allocated to it. In terms of dividing the
money, the board was OK with setting a
minimum base to the funding but also want-
ed to keep the different size of the schools in
mind. That way a very small school, for
example, doesnt end up getting much more
in per pupil funding than a larger school.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
Every graduate represents a success story
in one of the most effective job and anti-
poverty programs ever conceived, our public
schools, state Superintendent of Public
Instruction Tom Torlakson said. These num-
bers are a testament to the hard work of teach-
ers and administrators, of parents and, most of
all, of the students themselves. While they are
a great illustration of all that is going right in
California schools, they should also remind us
that schools need our support to continue to
improve so that every student graduates pre-
pared for college, a career and to contribute to
our states future.
Graduation and dropout rates do not show
the whole picture. Some students who are not
counted are still enrolled in school, are non-
diploma special education students or took
and passed the General Educational
Development Test.
Its helpful to have the data to track our
progress from year to year in our efforts to
keep more students in school and on track to
graduate. A look at the data shows a higher
percentage of the class of 2011 graduating
than had been true for the class of 2010. This
is good news because it also means the
dropout rate declined, said County
Superintendent Anne Campbell.
Campbell added the local districts are mak-
ing good progress in reducing dropout rates,
especially for black, Hispanic and Pacic
Islander students.
As our schools continue to focus on closing
the achievement gap, its great to see the
improvement in graduation rates for these
groups, she said.
Locally, South San Francisco Unified
School District had the highest graduation
rate, at 92.7 percent, while La Honda-
Pescadero Unied, at 72.7 percent, had the
lowest. When it comes to dropout rates, South
San Francisco Unied had the lowest with 3.8
percent while La Honda-Pescadero Unied
had the highest at 18.2 percent.
Having higher graduation rates and lower
dropout rates doesnt mean there isnt work to
be done an achievement gap continues
among students who are Hispanic, black or
English learners compared to others. These
new numbers are actually a guide for educa-
tion leaders trying to combat that gap. This
year, the graduation gap for students tradition-
ally at the lower end of the academic achieve-
ment gap increased both locally and statewide.
Statewide, the graduation rate increased 1.5
percent from the 2010 graduation rate. Larger
gains were seen among Hispanic and black
students at 2.2 and 2.3 percentage points
respectively, with the biggest increase being
among English learners at 3.8 percentage
points. The graduation rate for socioeconomi-
cally disadvantaged students climbed nearly 2
percentage points, from 68.1 to 70 percent.
San Mateo County saw similar gains. The
overall graduation rate increased 2 percent
over 2010. The graduation rates of Hispanic
and black students increased by 1.9 percent
and 1.4 percent respectively. English learners
saw the largest gain of 6.3 percent. Lastly, the
graduation rates for socioeconomically disad-
vantaged students climbed nearly 2 percent-
age points, from 74 to 75.9 percent.
Andy Parsons, associate superintendent of
instruction for the San Mateo Union High
School District, said he believes the gradua-
tion rates will only continue to increase as the
district continues to work harder to offer stu-
dents support sooner. Recently, for example,
the district counselors began working with
counselors at local middle schools to identify
children who would need additional support
before they start high school. In addition,
there are more opportunities for students to
make up units during the school year through
blended courses that offer a combination of
work online and with a teacher.
To download state, county, district and
school graduation and dropout rates visit the
California Department of Education
DataQuest website at
http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/.
Continued from page 1
GRAD RATE
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
If your garden or yard is feeling too small,
expand your horizons without buying another
square inch of property or doing much work.
Just borrow some landscape.
Borrowed landscape is a technique fre-
quently used in designing Japanese gardens,
where it is called shakkei, but it can be
employed in any garden style. The idea is to
incorporate distant elements of the surround-
ing landscape into your own, creating the feel-
ing of greater space.
You could reap a feeling of innite space if
that distant element is a mountain or ocean
that stretches all the way to the horizon. Or
you could just borrow a bit of scenery from
your neighbors yard an attractive clump of
birch or larch trees, a grape arbor or a pergo-
la dripping with wisteria blooms, for example.
BEGIN YOUR BORROWING
First, look around to see what youd like to
borrow. Ideally, this should be done before
you plan or plant anything, even before
youve moved any dirt or stones around in
your own garden. But its usually not difcult
to borrow landscape even into an existing gar-
den.
No need to borrow a whole scene. A view of
a lumbering meadow that breaks into a range
of mountains might create too expansive a
feeling if on view from everywhere in your
garden. Part of the art in gardening is balanc-
ing a sense of coziness and enclosure, which
gives us the word garden (from the same
root as the words guard, yard and girth), with
a feeling for the innite, for limitless hori-
zons.
A window of some expansive scene
through an opening in a fence or hedge, for
example might make such a view all the
more precious. As for your neighbors pergo-
la clothed in wisteria: You might not want to
also see the red sports car he always parks
nearby.
BRING FOCUS ON
WHAT YOU WANT TO BORROW
Once youve decided which surrounding
scenery you might like to borrow, bring it on
home to your garden. This might entail noth-
ing more than planting or building something
to obstruct part of a view, thus lending focus
to what remains. Or it might require removing
some obstruction, such as a pine tree in the
wrong place or a fence thats too tall.
Most borrowed scenery represents just a
slice of what is out there, so bringing it home
might just mean selectively trimming that
pine tree or making just a hole in the fence. A
cut in the fence in itself contributes to the look
of the garden. Popular in both oriental and
occidental gardens are fences or walls with
moon windows, circular openings that
allow a chosen view.
By screening out much of the landscape
beyond, a small opening begs viewing of it; a
relatively narrow rectangular opening in a
fence or wall can bring attention to a distant
view. A pair of prominent evergreens and a
nonfunctional gate could provide a psycho-
logical entryway into your borrowed land-
scape.
MIMIC TO BRING THE OUTSIDE IN
Another way to borrow landscape is to
echo elements in the distant landscape with
similar elements in your garden.
A grouping of rocks in your space might
show kinship with a similarly shaped distant
mountain. A small but upright tree might
form a connection to stately, spired conifers
in the distance. A trickle of water even
rounded stones representing a dry streambed
might form a visual association with a
majestic waterway far away.
In most cases, borrowing a landscape
entails less muscle than creating one.
Expand your yards horizons, for free
The borrowed landscapeidea is to incorporate distant elements of the surrounding landscape
into your own, creating the feeling of greater space.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, JUNE 28
New Leaf Community Day Benets
Sonrisas Community Dental
Center. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. New Leaf
Community Markets, 150 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. Days sales will
be donated to a nonprofit that
provides access to affordable dental
care for low-income San Mateo
Coastside residents. For more
information contact
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Amazing ScienceWhiz Show. 2 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, Oak Room,
55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Amazing
Science presented by the Magic
Circus. Free. For more information call
522-7838.
Central Park Music Series. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Central Park, downtown San
Mateo, corner of Fifth Avenue and El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Enjoy jump
swing band music by Stompy Jones.
Free. For more information call 522-
7522 ext. 2767.
SVForum presents: Tech Women:
Your Identity, Your Data-What do
Women Want? 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Nextag, 2955 Campus Drive, San
Mateo. This event features a
presentation by Kaliya Hamlin.
Known as Identity Woman, in 2005
she co-founded in the worlds leading
industry forum focused on user-
centric digital identity, the Internet
Identity Workshop. $10 for SVForum
members. $25 for general public. For
more information visit
http://www.svforum.org.
Homeselling 101: Preparing your
home for sale. 6:30 p.m. Millbrae
Library, Meeting Room A, 1 Library
Ave., Millbrae. The meeting will cover
selling vs. renting, pricing to achieve
maximum value, costs involved in
selling, remodeling and marketing
property. All attendees will receive a
free home selling savings booklet.
Free. For more information visit
smcl.org.
Thursdays Group Series Dance
Classes. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City
Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. International
Standard, Level II Class learning Waltz
from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. All Level Bachata
Class from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
International Standard, Level I Class
learning Waltz from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.
All Level Salsa Class from 8 p.m. to 9
p.m. $16 to drop in. For more
information call 627-4854.
Movies on the Square: GI Joe: Rise
of Cobra. 8:45 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. This movie is rated PG-13. Free.
For more information call 780-7340
or visit
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/
movies.html.
FRIDAY, JUNE 29
Last day of service for the
Connections Shuttle Red Line and
Blue Line. City Hall, 610 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City. Riders are
encouraged to purchase shuttle
passes with this end date in mind.
Connections Shuttle passes will
continue to be sold at all sales
locations until June 28. Riders wishing
to purchase pushcards with fewer
than ve rides may do so during the
month of June at the City Hall sales
location. For more information call
286-3215.
Music on the Square: Mustache
Harbor Yacht Rock. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7340.
For Beginners Only Ballroom
Dance Classes. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. For
Beginners Only Group Series Class
learning Salsa 2. $16 to drop in. For
more information call 627-4854.
Little House Friday Night Dance:
The Dick Green Band. 7 p.m. to 11
p.m. Little House Activity Center, 800
Middle Ave., Menlo Park. Advance
tickets $10, $12 at door. For more
information and tickets call 326-0665.
Album Release Party: The Dave
Miller Trio with Rebecca DuMaine.
8 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $20. For more
information or to reserve tickets call
369-7770 or visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Friday Ballroom Dance Party. 8 p.m.
to Midnight. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. Bolero lessons from 8
p.m.to 9 p.m., followed by a three
hour ballroom dance party. $12 at 8
p.m. $10 at 9 p.m. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
SATURDAY, JUNE 30
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San
Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled
eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham or
sausage and French toast will be
served. There will also be juice, coffee
or tea. $8. $5 for children under 10.
For more information call 583-1740.
State Sen. Joe Simitians sidewalk
ofce hours. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Palo
Alto Farmers Market, Behind the
downtown post office, Hamilton
Avenue and Gilman Street, Palo Alto.
Community members are invited to
stop by with their questions and
concerns about state issues.
Admission to the farmers market is
free. For more information call 688-
6384 or visit senatorsimitian.com.
Friends of the Library Booksale:
San Bruno Library. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
San Bruno Library, 701 Angus Ave.,
San Bruno. Entrance to the lower level
is located on the Angus Avenue side
of the library. $5 buys you a bag to ll
to the brim with books. Paperbacks
50 cents each, hardbacks $1 each.
Specials as marked. For more
information call 616-7078.
Meet Local Artist and Author Janet
Barker. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. San Bruno
Library, 701 W. Angus Ave., San Bruno.
Painting demonstrations and
discussion of her contribution to the
new book Entrepreneur Success
Stories on how to become successful
doing something that you love. Free.
For more information call 616-7078.
Cat/Kitten Adoption Fair and
Education Program. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 LIbrary Ave.,
Millbrae. Books, DVDs and literature
on cat care available for checkout
with free library card. Foster care and
rescue volunteers available for feline
behavior advice and rescue training.
For more information call 697-7607.
Free Spinal Screenings. 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. New Leaf Community Markets,
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Free Spinal Screenings with Dr. Valerie
Spier, network chiropractor of the Sun
Center for Well Being. No
appointment necessary. For more
information contact
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Adopt-a-thon. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Center for Compassion, 1450 Rollins
Road, Burlingame. Those who
participate can choose their own
adoption fee for dogs, cats and small
animals. Adoption fees will be waived
for all Chihuahuas and Chihuahua
mixes. Donations will be accepted for
the Pick of the Litter thrift store. Free
admission. For more information call
340-7022.
Les Amis Salons First Birthday
Celebration. 5:30 p.m. Les Amis
Salon et Spa, 113 De Anza Blvd., San
Mateo. There will be a live band and
more. Free. For more information visit
salonlesamis.com.
A Grand Night for a Grand Cause:
Redwood Symphony performs a
fundraiser to purchase a new
Steinway piano for Caada
College. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Caada
College Main Theatre, 4200 Farm Hill
Blvd., Redwood City. Pianist and
Gershwin specialist Richard Glazier
joins Maestro Eric Kujawsky to
perform Gershwins Piano Concerto
in F. $30 per person. For more
information visit
http://www.redwoodsymphony.org.
SUNDAY, JULY 1
State Sen. Joe Simitians sidewalk
office hours. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Menlo Park Farmers Market, Chestnut
Street between Santa Cruz and
Menlo avenues. Community
members are invited to stop by with
their questions and concerns about
state issues. Admission to the farmers
market is free. For more information
call 688-6384 or visit
senatorsimitian.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
way the agency awarded two garbage-
related contracts and chided the joint pow-
ers agency for not following its stated goal
to conduct the requests for proposal
process with integrity and transparency.
In the letter to Porter, Hill also writes
that it is time to replace the board with
elected ofcials rather than the current
city staff that comprise the board.
Hill told the Daily Journal yesterday
this should also be true for boards at the
San Mateo County Mosquito Abatement
District and Mid-Peninsula Water District,
both rocked recently by embezzlement
allegations.
The most recent allegations have reaf-
rmed my belief that to remove the stench
of favoritism in the SBWMA contracting
process and increase accountability we
need to consider at the local or state
level legislating that board members be
elected ofcials, Hill wrote in the letter to
Porter.
Porter is the public works director for
San Mateo County and RethinkWastes
JPA is comprised of most cities in the
county.
Porter told the Daily Journal yesterday
that the joint powers agreement can be
amended to change who sits on the board
if eight out of the 12 member agencies
approve it.
As far as Hidalgos claims, the board is
meeting in closed session at 1 p.m. today
before the regularly scheduled meeting to
discuss her allegations, Porter told the
Daily Journal.
Since its a personnel issue, its hard to
comment. We will meet in closed session
with legal counsel on the claims of retali-
ation and gure out what the next steps
should be, Porter said.
Hill believes the board will take
Hidalgos allegations seriously and per-
form a thorough investigation.
The budget the board will consider
today states, the proposed budget does
not include any recommended changes to
budget policy, or a net change in head-
count, though there are proposed changes
in stafng. We are proposing to eliminate
one full-time salaried position, the recy-
cling coordinator, but augment our envi-
ronmental education staff.
Hidalgos current salary is $86,724,
according to the proposed budget.
RethinkWaste is a joint powers authori-
ty of 12 public agencies including
Atherton, Belmont, Burlingame, East Palo
Alto, Foster City, Hillsborough, Menlo
Park, Redwood City, San Carlos, San
Mateo, San Mateo County and the West
Bay Sanitary District.
The board meets today in closed session
at 1 p.m. The regular meeting is 2 p.m.
today, Shoreway Environmental Center,
community room, 224 Shoreway Road,
San Carlos.
Continued from page 1
HILL
erty.
The waterfront has been terribly neg-
lected and it hasnt had the opportunity
to have a vision and it sort of developed
on its own, Councilwoman Barbara
Pierce said in a video of the meeting.
The Inner Harbor area includes the
Docktown Marina, womens jail, a
homeless shelter, the Redwood City
Police Department, Bair Island Aquatic
Center and vacant city-owned property.
The county plans to build its new cor-
rectional facility on a four-acre parcel
on the former Chemical Way now
known as Woodhouse Industrial Park
and the Port of Redwood City is nearby.
Blomquist Avenue and Seaport
Boulevard house industrial uses and res-
idential and commercial uses cross
Redwood Creek.
With so many disparate uses and own-
ers involved, city ofcials say a precise
plan is necessary to guide any future
development.
The citys role is not to develop land.
The citys role is to set the table, said
Councilman John Seybert.
The council hopes to mimic down-
town for which it established a precise
plan of restrictions, zoning, allowable
uses and height limits long before devel-
opers set up shop. Later in the meeting,
Planning Commissioner Nancy
Radcliffe suggested the city take the
even earlier step of establishing a task
force of residents and city staff to craft
the precise plan.
Based on the input Monday night,
City Manager Bob Bell said he will
return likely the first meeting in
September with a draft plan for commu-
nity involvement. Decisions about the
actual plan content will come much
later and city staff estimate the public
process will take at least one year.
About six months in, the city will con-
sider consultant recommendations for
the environmental impact report. All
together, the EIR and precise plan will
be ready for public viewing and com-
ment in about a year and cost approxi-
mately $200,000.
Timeliness is important, Seybert said,
otherwise you get to the end of a
process and you tend to forget why you
even started it.
On the ip side, he cautioned against
speeding along so fast community input
is ignored.
Councilwoman Rosanne Foust also
asked that the city include early in the
public process the federal and state
authorities with jurisdictional responsi-
bilities for the shoreline.
You dont want to get so far down
the path and then things change, she
said.
Foust also focused on what is realistic
for putting such different land uses
together and Councilman Ian Bain
asked for an inventory of what property
is a blank slate versus xed uses like the
police department building and jail.
Although the meeting avoided talk of
specic development in the area, Bain
later told the Daily Journal he thinks the
city has many opportunities including
conversion of the waters edge piece of
the Cemex property into an aquatic park
and residential development adjacent to
the oating homes at Docktown. If the
city heads that direction, it will need to
look seriously at a pedestrian overpass
near Redwood Creek, Bain said.
He also said the city could open up
opportunities for improvements at
Woodside Road and Highway 101 by
moving the corporation yard, possibly
to the Cemex site.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
HARBOR
THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 2012
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Conditions in general
look extremely favorable for you, with one exception:
the management of your resources. If youre cautious
in this area, everything will be fne.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Domestic issues should be
given priority over all other mundane activities. Once
youve met these obligations, go ahead and spend
your time however youd like.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- In matters where you
allow your emotions to govern your behavior, you
arent apt to like the results. Conversely, in situations
where you logically think things through, all should
go well.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If theres something spe-
cial that you want and have been hoping to fnd at a
good price, do your shopping early. Youll have better
luck before everything gets picked over.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Situations that you think
through thoroughly and can personally control should
work out rather well, as long as you havent over-
looked anything. Be sure to check the small details.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You can be a com-
passionate person who is ready to be helpful when-
ever possible. If you get a chance to exercise these
fne qualities, keep your good deeds to yourself.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Assess all develop-
ments logically, but also give credence to your
intuitive insights. These innate perceptions could fll
in the blank spots that your practical side misses.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If youre involved with
people who share your work world, its OK to talk
shop. However, it you try to do so with anybody else,
youre likely to elicit a big fat yawn.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Activities that offer
elements of friendly competition might be extremely
appealing to you. The important thing is to engage in
such with pals who enjoy the game for its own sake.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- If you fnd yourself in
either a mentally or physically competitive situation,
dont despair. You have a hefty reserve to draw upon
that your opponent lacks.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- When negotiating an
important contract, hold frm to your terms and dont
jump at the frst offer if it isnt to your liking. Youll
get what you want if you dont look desperate.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- New knowledge that
youve had a diffcult time assimilating will be utilized to
your advantage when, all of a sudden, the lights go on in
your noggin. Youll suddenly have all the right answers.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
6-28-12
wEDNSDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Concrete reinforcer
6 Semi parts
10 New
12 Cross
14 Gourd-shaped rattle
15 Live in
16 Tasty bit
18 Mao -- -tung
19 Slither actor
21 Mr. Kristofferson
23 Halloween decor
24 Kind of jump
26 Quahog
29 Erelong
31 Cease
33 -- -- Three Lives
35 Bagel center
36 Lemon drink
37 Calf-length
38 Panache
40 Music producer Brian --
42 Booking
43 Troubadours instrument
45 Warrior princess
47 Help out
50 Gentle breeze
52 Ballad part
54 Century plants
58 Attar source
59 Spanish explorer (2 wds.)
60 Go nuts
61 Stair post
DOwN
1 Grog ingredient
2 Bambis aunt
3 Clingy seedpod
4 Honshu volcano
5 Spy missions
6 Recurring
7 TV network
8 Champagne category
9 Enjoys a fne brandy
11 -- es Salaam
12 Gardener, often
13 Coloring
17 Superfcial (hyph.)
19 Hiawathas craft
20 Coral formation
22 Slender
23 --, humbug!
25 Green parrot
27 Adjust the tires
28 Radio and TV
30 Hud Oscar winner
32 Cub Scout group
34 Groove on
39 Burrow
41 Atmosphere part
44 Receptions
46 Delete a fle
47 Deadly snake
48 Ovids route
49 Statistics
51 Ate for dinner
53 Faultfnder
55 Take an oath
56 Cousteaus summer
57 Our sun
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Thursday June 28, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
FOSTER CITY
ROUTE
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required. Must have
valid license and appropriate insurance coverage
to provide this service in order to be eligible.
Papers are available for pickup in San Mateo at
3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Credential Teacher
Resume Available
Pre-K to College
Multiple Subjects
Contact Elizabeth
opendoortutoring@yahoo.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
Were a top, full-service pro-
vider of home care, in need of
your experienced, committed
care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits.
Call for Alec at
(650) 556-9906 or visit
www.homesweethomecare.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
JEWELRY SALES
Entry up to $13 Dia up to $20
650-367-6500 FX:650-367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
LINE COOK - Night Shift,
1201 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
OPERATIONS ARCHITECT
San Mateo, CA.
Requirements: MS or equiv. in CS,
etc.+2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS+5) Exp. w/
SAN, NAS, EMC, Clariion, FAS, FC,
NFS, iSCSI, Solaris, Oracle RAC &
R.E.Linux reqd.
Contact: Res: RingCentral, Inc.,
1400 Fashion Island Blvd, 7th Floor
San Mateo, CA 94404.
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514510
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Joseph Isaac Mejia
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Joseph Isaac Mejia filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: Joseph Isaac Mejia, aka
Jose Isaac Mejia
Proposed name: Joseph Isaac Mejia
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 3,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/18/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/15/2012
(Published, 06/21/12, 06/28/12,
07/05/12, 07/12/12)
23 Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514530
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Michael Kuo
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Michael Kuo filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Michael Kuo
Proposed name: Michael Douglas Ment-
zer
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 2,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/18/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/15/2012
(Published, 06/21/12, 06/28/12,
07/05/12, 07/12/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250700
The following person is doing business
as: Cafe del Sol, 1010 Doyle Street,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Emilia
Gonzalez Marquez, 660 East 3rd Ave.,
San Mateo, CA 94401. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Emilia Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/07/12, 06/14/12, 06/21/12, 06/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250744
The following person is doing business
as: Potlatche Benefits, 982 Holly St.,
SAN CARLOS, CA, 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Octavio
Jara, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Octavio Jara /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/07/12, 06/14/12, 06/21/12, 06/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250306
The following person is doing business
as: All Star Janitorial Services, 35 San
Bruno Ave. #8, BRISBANE, CA 94005 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Luis Meja and Rosa Rosales, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by
aHusband and Wife. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Luis M. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/07/12, 06/14/12, 06/21/12, 06/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250472
The following person is doing business
as: Tiner Financial Services, 768 Edge-
wood Rd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Susan Partlan, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2007.
/s/ Susan Partlan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/12, 06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250643
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Ora-Shyne, 2) Aura Shyne, 415
Portofino Dr., Unit C, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Sheila Pangilinan, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Sheila Pangilinan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/12, 06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250885
The following person is doing business
as: Locksmith Emergency, 3014 Los Pra-
dos St. #315, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
SBS 24 Locksmith, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Sheila Pangilinan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/12, 06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250969
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Guns and Tactical, 360 El
Camino Real, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Peninsula Guns LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 07/01/12.
/s/ Jeannie Ganim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250802
The following person is doing business
as: ECS Corporate Events, 329 Spruce
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Elite Corporate Services, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Roger Mogana /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250910
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 516 & 520 East Bellevue Ave-
nue Apartments, 520, East Bellevue Ave.
San Mateo, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Richard
Tod Spieker and Catherine R, Spieker,
60 Mulberry Ln., MENLO PARK, CA
94027. The business is conducted by a
Husband and Wife. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 06/12/2012
/s/ Richard Tod Spieker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250520
The following person is doing business
as: Satellite Cable Center, 2464 Alame-
da De Las Pulgas, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Basil Zaru, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Basil Zaru /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251035
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Burlingame Long Term Care, San
Mateo Rehabilitation & Wellness Centre,
3) San Mateo Healthcare & Wellness
Centre, 1100 Trousdale Dr., BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: San Mateo
Healthcare Centre, LP, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/19/2012
/s/ Shlomo Rednitz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12, 07/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250868
The following person is doing business
as: Offroad Creeper, 214 Shaw Rd. Bldg.
8 Ste. 5, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Paul Camping, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
06/12/2012
/s/ Paul Camping /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250833
The following person is doing business
as: MGM Auto Xperts, 1004 S. Clare-
mont St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Eagle Maintenance Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/01/2012
/s/ John Woo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251102
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Kua Massage Therapy, 2) Kua
Massage, 601 South B St., Ste. A, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Karite Upuia Ah-
kiong 215 7th Ave., #4, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Karite Upuia Ahkiong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250652
The following person is doing business
as: A. Fowler Plumbing, 736 Fathom Dr.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Andrew
Fowler. same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/14/2011.
/s/ Andrew Fowler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250652
The following person is doing business
as: Blue Line Pizza, 1108 Burlingame
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: The
Pizza Alliance 2, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Angela Pace /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251104
The following person is doing business
as: 1) HMJConsulting, 2) HMJRecovery,
229 Valdez Ave., HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hazel Joanes, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/01/2002 .
/s/ Hazel Joanes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: June 22, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Ailin Jue
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
2450 S. El Camino Real
SAN MATEO, CA 94403-2216
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer and Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 28
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Bradford Louie
Case Number 122477
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Bradford Louie. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Calvin
Louie in the Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo. The Petition for
Probate requests that Calvin Louie be
appointed as personal representative to
administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This
athourity will allow the personal repre-
sentative to take many actions without
obtaining court approval. Before taking
certain very important actions, however,
the personal representative will be re-
quired to give notice to interested per-
sons unless they have waived notice or
consented to the proposed action.) The
independent administration authority will
be granted unless an interested person
files an objection to the petition and
shows good cause why the court should
not grant the authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: August 15, 2012 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, 1st Floor, Redwood City,
CA 94063. If you object to the granting
of the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Mason J. Sacks
560 Winchester Blvd., Ste. 500
SAN JOSE, CA 95128
(408)358-4400
Dated: 06/26/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on June 28, July 5, 12, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
210 Lost & Found
LOST JUNE 12TH - Chain & pendant,
inscribed with Grant Me the Serenity,
(415)260-2930
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
296 Appliances
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR GE, Black stainless
steel side by side, $300 (650)348-5169
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
STAINLESS ELECTROLUX dishwasher
4 years old $99 (650)366-1812
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new, SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
THULE BIKE rack, for roof load bar,
Holds bike upright. $100 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress
$25, (650)873-8167
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $40 for
all.(650)589-8348
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard SOLD!
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MUCH SOUGHT after Chinese silver Fat
Man coin $75 (650)348-6428
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. (650)871-7200
SIGNED AUTOGRAPH Art and Gloria
Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
50s RRECORD player Motorola, it
works $50 obo Sold!
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUDIO SPEAKERS, (2) mint condition,
works great, Polt stereo for computer,
TV, $10.00 both (650)578-9208
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
480 x 9600 DPI, Restores colors,
brightness, $40.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
304 Furniture
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, (650)589-8348
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all.SOLD!
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. SOLD!
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
SOLD!
FOLDING LEG TABLE - 6 x 2.5, $25.,
(415)346-6038
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN/BAR STOOL wooden with
high back $99 (650)343-4461
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SIDECHAIR, WOOD arms & legs, Euro
sleek styling, uphol. seat cushion NICE
SOLD!
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
SOLD!
24
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Melodramatic
Rats!
5 Rooms with
microscopes
9 Descendant
14 There Is Nothin
Like a __
15 1988 World
Series MVP
Hershiser
16 NJ-based
supermarket
chain
17 Yeah, right
18 Life in Len
19 Subordinate to
20 Tree-hugging
actress?
23 Entourage
agent Gold
24 WWII journalist
25 Yellow Brick
Road accessory
28 Silver Bullet
Band leader Bob
30 Old map inits.
32 __ we alone?
33 Inner-tubing
activist?
38 Blows away
39 Ohio-based
faucet maker
40 Poor-shooting
comedy star?
46 Campfire
remnant
47 1994 speed
skating gold
medalist Jansen
48 Backup crew
50 Uncommon
53 Nonstick kitchen
brand
56 __ gratias
57 Pontiac-driving
basketball
player?
60 Trooper on the
road
62 Modest attire
63 Show youre in
64 Ruthless bosses
65 Mtley __
66 Stalk in the
garden
67 Target competitor
68 Cranks (up)
69 TV brother
whose real name
was Eric
DOWN
1 Brand with a
three-stripe logo
2 Peon
3 Mapmaker
Vespucci
4 UFO-tracking
org.
5 __-dovey
6 Serif-free font
7 Physicians
prescription
8 Crate piece
9 King Abdullah,
for one
10 Grand __
11 Race-sanctioning
biggie
12 Homage in verse
13 Science Friday
network
21 Urban planners
concern
22 Saw genre
26 Torah container
27 Nintendos
Super __
29 Morales of
NYPD Blue
31 Many-axled roller
34 Masked worker
35 On the Aegean
36 Zen garden bit
37 Future RNs
course
40 Refrain syllables
41 Pac-12 member
42 Taco Bell menu
item
43 Army base?
44 Provided a segue
for
45 Ophelias
avenger
49 Dial-up hardware
51 Tonsorial tool
52 Pie makers pride
54 Bring together,
dating-wise
55 Sign before
Taurus
58 Classic disco hit
59 Major party
60 Thats
disgusting!
61 Newsman
Donaldson
By Angela Olson Halsted and Doug Peterson
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/28/12
06/28/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $30 each or both for $50. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $90,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RONCO ROTTISERIE - New model,
black, all accessories, paid $150., asking
$75., (650)290-1960
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $5. SOLD
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20 (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS vintage
drinking glasses, 1970s, colored etching,
perfect condition, original box, $25.
SOLD!
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
310 Misc. For Sale
AC/DC REFRIGERATOR - for RV or
Boat, 20 tall, 23 deep, 19 wide, $499.,
(650)580-3316
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SOLD
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 SOLD!
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm, SOLD!
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FREE DWARF orange tree (650)834-
4926
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GARDEN PLANTS - Calla lilies, princess
plant, ferns, inexpensive, ranging $4-15.,
much more, (415)346-6038
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 (650)574-4586
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
310 Misc. For Sale
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
ONE BOYS Superman Christmas Wrap-
ping paper $2., (650)873-8167
OUTDOOR SCREENS - New 4 Panel
Wooden Outdoor Screen, Retail $130
With Metal Supports, $85. obo, call Ma-
ria, (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Christ-
mas Wrapping Paper Retail $6 selling $2
each 6-7 yards, (650)873-8167
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLE CLOTH oval 120" by 160" with
12 napkins medium blue never used $25
(650)755-8238
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
310 Misc. For Sale
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
TRUMPET VINE tree in old grove pots 2
@ $15 ea SOLD
UNOPENED, HARDCOVEED 556 page
BBQ book from many countries recipes
for spice rubs, sauces, grilling, photos
$12.00, SOLD!
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, (650)578-9208
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA - ex-
cellent condition, 22 volumes, $45.,
(415)346-6038
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$25., (650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $50 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
25 Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
2 ANTIQUE Glass Towel bars $60 pair
(650)271-0731
3 FRAMLESS shower door 3/8th thick,
25x66, 24x70, 26x74, $30 ea.
(650)271-0731
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, $25
(650)594-1494
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19.
(650)766-4858 Redwood City
GOLF CLUBS - women RH complete set
W/ Cart & Bag used for only 5 lessons
like new $95 SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45 SOLD!
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$65 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
LAT PULL machine, with accessories,
$50 OBO, SOLD!
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
PROFESSIONAL DART BOARD with
cabinet, brand new, $50obo SOLD!
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
BURLINGAME
ESTATE SALE
Entire Contents
Friday 6/29 &
Saturday 6/30
10am to 4pm
524 Francisco Dr.
Burlingame CA
94010
NEIGHBORHOOD
GARAGE SALE
Harbor Side Complex
Between Shell &
Beach Park
827 Spruce Ln.
Foster City
Saturday, June 30th
8:00 to 4:00
Furniture, Household
Items, Tools and More!
THE THRIFT SHOP
STORE-WIDE
CLEARANCE
50% OFF ALL SALES
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CANON 35MM CAMERA - Various B/W
developing items and film, $75. for all,
(415)680-7487
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
FURNISHED ROOM for rent in Daly City,
$750., (650)773-1409
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CADILLAC 93 Sedan $ 1,800 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
PLYMOUTH 72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
SUBARU LOVERS - 88 XT original, 81K
miles, automatic, garaged, SOLD!
635 Vans
1999 CHRYSLER Town & Country Van,
Runs Well $700 SOLD!
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
WE FIX CARS
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, (650)588-7005
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
(415)999-4947
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. SOLD!
670 Auto Parts
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Concrete
Construction
JOHN KULACZ CONSTRUCTION
Europena Quality! Worked in
San Mateo County for over 10 years,
20 years of experience
INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR
REMODELING KITCHEN BATH
DECKS, ECT.
(415)378-8810
email:
JKulaczConstruction@gmail.com
excellent references in SM County
license# 879568insured, bonded
Construction Construction
26
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing
Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133 (650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
JONS HAULING
Serving the Peninsula since 1976
Free Estimates
Junk and debris removal,
Yard/lot clearing,
Furniture, appliance hauling.
Specializing in hoarder clean up
(650)393-4233
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
Sprinkler systems New fences
Flagstone Interlocking pavers
New driveways Clean-ups
Hauling Gardening
Retaining walls Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653 (650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$69 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Sewer trenchless
Pipe replacement
Replace sewer line without
ruining your yard
(650) 898-4444
Lic#933572
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079 (650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zeriloe
(650)245-8212
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547 (650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of Law Office of
Jason Honaker Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920 650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
27 Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER? GOT BEER?
We Do! We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave.
@ S. Railroad
San Mateo
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908 (650)652-4908
Food
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo -
(650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -
(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754 650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087 (650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
Table Showers now available
One hour $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER SUNFLOWER
MASSAGE MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758 (650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday June 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Jewelry Silver Watches Diamonds
1Z11 80fll08M0 90 0J400
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/12
WEBUY