Sie sind auf Seite 1von 107

A Study On IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT Under

HINDUSTAN ZINC LIMITED (VEDANTA)

A Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment for the The Post Graduate Diploma in Rural Development

By Punam Kumari
Roll No. - 66 Session- 2010-2012

Under the Supervision of

Rev. Fr. (Dr.) Alexius Ekka, SJ Director, XISS, Ranchi

DEPARTMENT OF RURAL MANAGEMENT XAVIER INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL SERVICE PURULIA ROAD, RANCHI MARCH 2012

APPROVAL SHEET

This is to certify that the dissertation titled Impact Assessment of Livestock Management has been prepared by Punam Kumari in partial fulfillment of the Post Graduation Diploma in Rural Development. This embodies data collected and analyzed by the candidate under the guidance of Rev. Fr. (Dr.) Alexius Ekka, SJ, Director, Xavier Institute of Social Service, Ranchi and it is hereby approved as indicating the proficiency of the candidate.

. Rev. Fr. (Dr.) Alexius Ekka, SJ (Guide)

... Prof. M.H. Ansari (H.O.D, Rural Development)

.. (External Examiner)

Rev. Fr. (Dr.) Alexius Ekka, SJ (Director, XISS)

CONTENTS
Approval Sheet.i List of Figures ..v Acronyms..viii Acknowledgementix Executive Summary.x

CHAPTER CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION CHAPTER 2: REVIEW OF LITERATURE CHAPTER 3: METHODOLOGY OF STUDY


3.1 Methods of Research 3.2 Selection of samples and sample size 3.3 Objectives of study 3.4 Variables of study 3.5 Methods for collecting Primary Data

PAGE NO. 1 5 7
7 7 7 8 8

CHAPTER 4: ORGANIZATIONAL AND STUDY AREA PROFILE 10


4.1. Vision 10

ii

4.2. Mission 4.3. Approach and strategy 4.4. Area of study 4.5. Group social policy 4.6. Corporate Social Responsibility

10 10 11 12 12

CHAPTER 5: FINDING AND ANALYSIS


5.1. Livestock possessed 5.2. Types of shed 5.3. Livestock assets in all units 5.4. Calf details 5.5. Uses of livestock in all units 5.6. A.I. activity 5.7. Vaccination activity details in all units 5.8. De-worming activity details in all units 5.9. Mode of treatment details of all units 5.10. Infertility treatment camp activity details of all units 5.11. Fodder demonstration activity details in all units 5.12. Farmer exposure visit activity details of all units 5.13. Insurance activity details of all units 5.14. Problem details of all units 34 37 39 39

14
14 15 16 20 24 30

40 42 45

46

iii

CHAPTER 6: SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS


6.1 Suggestions 6.2 Recommendations 51

49
49

CHAPTER 7: CONCLUSION
Bibliography Annexure

54
I II

iv

LIST OF FIGURES Figure 5.1: Livestock possessed in all units Figure 5.2: Types of shed Figure 5.3.1: Livestock assets in RDM unit Figure 5.3.2: Livestock assets in ZM unit Figure 5.3.3: Livestock assets in ZSD unit Figure 5.3.4: Livestock assets in RAM unit Figure 5.3.5: Livestock assets in CLZS unit Figure 5.4.1: Calf details of RDM unit Figure 5.4.2: Calf details of ZM unit Figure 5.4.3: Calf details of ZSD unit Figure 5.4.4: Calf details of RAM unit Figure 5.4.5: Calf details of CLZS unit Figure 5.4.6: Calf details in Billiya village Figure 5.5.1 (a): Use of livestock in RDM unit Figure 5.5.1 (b): Details of livestock product and sale in RDM unit Figure 5.5.2 (a): Use of livestock in ZM unit Figure 5.5.2 (b): Details of livestock product and sale in ZM unit Figure 5.5.3 (a): Use of livestock in ZSD unit Figure 5.5.3 (b): Details of livestock product and sale in ZSD unit Figure 5.5.4 (a): Use of livestock in RAM unit

PAGE NO. 15 16 17 18 18 20 20 21 22 23 24 24 25 25 26 26 27 27 27 28

Figure 5.5.4 (b): Details of livestock product and sale in RAM unit Figure 5.5.5 (a): Use of livestock in CLZS unit Figure 5.5.5 (b): Details of livestock product and sale in CLZS unit

28 29 30

Figure 5.5.6 (a): Unit wise A.I activities details (HZLs Target and Achievement) 30 Figure 5.5.6 (b): Unit wise A.I activities details (from survey) 31

Figure 5.5.6 (c): Unit wise A.I activities details in cow and buffalo (our coverage) 32 Figure 5.6.1 (a): A.I in livestock in all units (includes repeat and confirm pregnancy) 33 Figure 5.6.1 (b): Breed wise A.I details in livestock in all units 34

Figure 5.7 (a): Unit wise Vaccination activities details (HZls Target and Achievement) 35 Figure 5.7 (b): Unit wise Vaccination activities details (from survey) 35

Figure 5.7 (c): Unit wise HS Vaccination activities coverage details in % (from survey) 36 Figure 5.7 (d): Unit wise BQ Vaccination activities coverage details in % (from survey) 36 Figure 5.7 (e): Unit wise FMD Vaccination activities coverage details in % (from survey) 37 Figure 5.8 (a): Unit wise De-worming activities details (HZLs Target and Achievement) 38 Figure 5.8 (b): Unit wise De-worming activities details (from survey) 38

vi

Figure 5.9: Mode of treatment in all units (from survey) Figure 5.10: Unit wise Infertility Treatment Camp activities details (from survey)

39

40 Figure 5.11 (a): Unit wise fodder demonstration activities details (HZLs target and achievement) Figure 5.11 (b): Unit wise fodder demonstration activities details (from survey) 40 40

Figure 5.12 (a): Unit wise farmer exposure visit activities details (HZLs target and achievement) Figure 5.12 (b): Unit wise farmer exposure visit activities details (from survey) 41 42

Figure 5.12.1 (a): Unit wise farmer training programme activities details (HZLs target and achievement) 44

Figure 5.12.1 (b): Unit wise farmer training programme activities details (from survey) 44 Figure 15.13 (a): Unit wise insurance activities details (HZLs target and achievement) 46 Figure 15.13 (b): Unit wise insurance activities details (from survey) Figure 5.14: Problems details in all the units 46 47

vii

ACRONYMS
A.I. BAIF BQ CLZS CP FMD HF HS HZL ND PD RAM RDM ZM ZSD Artificial Insemination Bharatiya Agro Industries Foundations Black Quarter Chanderiya Lead Zinc Smelter Confirm Pregnancy Foot and Mouth Disease Holstein Friesian Hemorrhagic Septicemia Hindustan Zinc Limited Non Descriptive Pregnancy Diagnosis Rampura Agucha Mines Rajpura Dariba Mines Zawar Mines Zinc Smelter Debari

viii

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The successful completion of study has never been possible without the valuable support and contribution of many people and institutions. First of all I would like to express gratitude to my dissertation guide Rev. Fr. (Dr.) Alexius Ekka, SJ, Director XISS, since without his support, it would not have been possible for me to complete this endeavor. I am highly indebted to him for his precious words of wisdom that inspired me. I am sincerely thankful for both his suggestion as well as appreciation, which have made me more proficient. I would also like to show my gratitude to Prof. Niranjan Sahoo, Summer Placement Coordinator, and a faculty of Department of Rural Management for providing me opportunity to undertake the dissertation as a part of my two year postgraduate course. I would like to thank Prof. M. H. Ansari, Head of Department of Rural Development for supporting throughout my dissertation work. I am immensely thankful and convey my sincere gratitude to Mr. Bherulal Sukhwal and Mr. D. S. Chouhan, my guide at organization for supporting, guiding and providing suggestions at every stage of the study. My sincere thanks to all field workers at Hindustan Zinc Limited for helping me in my field visits. My heartfelt thanks to few of my colleagues who assisted me all through the compilation of the thesis.

Punam Kumari Session 2010-12

ix

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Hindustan Zinc limited is a separate body of Vedanta Corporate. As it is working on profit making side of business, it has its own corporate social responsibilities. Following the map of Corporate Social Responsibility it works in every area of development sector. Livestock management is one of its projects on which HZL is working since last two years. Livestock Management project of HZL basically focuses on cattle cross breed improvement by Artificially Insemination to the cows/buffaloes. For larger impact and superior success of this project HZL has signed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with BAIF on Oct, 2009. The Programme is running for the last two years but it was not evaluated by any person in the organization. First time the Programme has been taken for consideration for evaluation, and in two months I did my best to come out with the real picture of the project. The Programme is running in five units of HZL which is spread in four districts of Rajasthan namely Rajpura Dariba Mines (RDM), Zinc Smelter Debari (ZSD), Rampura Agucha Mines (RAM), Zawar Mines (ZM), and Chanderiya Lead Zinc Smelter (CLZS). It covers 26 villages in total. For study all twenty six villages were taken. Sample size was variable, 20% of beneficiaries were taken in some villages whereas 50% beneficiaries were taken in few villages. The method adopted for the data collection was Personal Interview and Focused Group Discussion. The data collection has done by taking five parameters- awareness, disease control, productivity, mortality, maternity and most importantly artificial insemination. Awareness about different diseases like Foot and Mouth disease (FMD), Hemorrhagic Septicemia (HS) and Black Quarter (BQ), its effects and presence in last few years have been checked. These parameters showed how the Programme has affected cattle farming in the area. Although many limitations came out during collection of different data, the collected data reveals many positive and negative aspects of the Programme. The programme has made x

many valuable impacts and improved the condition of livestock in the area. Limitations of the Programme were also highlighted in the report and some recommendations and suggestions were given so that by following the report overcoming the limitations the Programme could be improved further. The findings showed that nearly 98% sample farmers were aware of FMD and HS and at the same time nearly 99% cattle were artificially inseminated in an effective manner. The credit of this awareness goes to Hindustan Zinc Limited because the farmers feel that it is Hindustan Zinc Limited has who made them conscious by providing livestock caring facilities and knowledge sharing. During the interview schedule when local people were questioned about the contribution of HZL for livestock management, they cooperated in all possible manners. Few people had an opinion that if after three or four years, HZL would charge 20 to 50% of the total cost incurred on one artificial insemination, then they would have no problem in paying the amount. A few cattle owners were unaware of the activities carried out by HZL at the same time a few people were aware of it but they were never a part of it. During the study it is found that they also wanted to be a part of HZL for imparting awareness among other cattle owners. Completing a study in limited time itself is a challenge for any researcher and as a young researcher I did my best to complete the whole research as scheduled. As a researcher, I have learnt from the study about different breeds of cows, buffalos and other livestock management aspects like maintenance, information about different cattle diseases and its effect. I acquired clear understanding about how livestock would be a livelihood option which would ultimately develop socio economic condition of a society.

xi

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
Livestock development and management has always been a concern in the context of Indian economy, along with agriculture. The past and present extension approaches has laid higher emphasis on transfer of technology to increase overall production and enhance income level of livestock owners. Animal Husbandry and Dairy Development plays a prominent role in the rural economy in supplementing the income of rural households, particularly, the landless, the small and the marginal farmers. It also provides subsidiary occupation in semi, small and marginal farmers. India is endowed with the largest livestock population in the world. It accounts for 57 per cent of the worlds buffalo population and 14 per cent of the cattle population. According to Livestock Census (2003), the country has about 18.5 crore cattle and 9.8 crore buffaloes. In India, Rajasthan is endowed with largest livestock population. Livestock is an essential asset to the rural poor, both to those directly engaged in agricultural production and to poor non-farm rural households who rely on local production for affordable nutrition. Animal production confers many economic advantages by small farm operations, and in the era, rising urban incomes and improving market access for animal products profitability is increasing. If small farmers can participate more effectively in food market growth then they can also contribute significantly to generate livelihood through livestock management. Some people in rural areas also use livestock for economic purpose for the emergency period. They sell it as and when needed, like marriage, disease treatment etc. So, there is need of livestock development as it has very good potential to make a small, marginal and landless farmer economically sustainable. Sustainable livelihood through livestock farming was the main aim of Hindustan Zinc Limited behind their livestock management project so that farmer can have maximum utilization of their resources.

The significance of the livestock management at Hindustan Zinc Limited was to work on critical issues hampering the growth of the livestock sector which were non-availability of feed and fodder, healthcare and market outlets, timely technical guidance and information on disease outbreaks. HZL worked with cattle owners to change their mindset about cattle farming is also as beneficial as agriculture farming by giving them a thought to transforming their problems into opportunity. For future prospect they imbibed this thinking to cattle owner about opening dairy farm by educating them on different issue of livestock. HZL gave has given them opportunity to know cattle farming in different states. Animal husbandry has potential to provide food and nutritional security. HZLs major objective was to breed low yielding, nondescript cattle and buffaloes with genetically superior exotic or improved Indian breeds while ensuring genetic improvement of elite native breeds. The newly born high yielding cows and buffaloes are a reliable source of livelihood generation. The means of income works even in drought prone areas. The main areas of intervention by Hindustan Zinc Limited was to improve the livestock progeny by providing facilities like artificial insemination (A.I.) services, animal health service, training and extension services. ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION Artificial Insemination (A.I.) is a popular, simple and inexpensive treatment of infertility in animals, in which the sperm from the male is collected and introduced artificially into the reproductive tract of the female for conception. A.I. Technique The process of artificial insemination in cattle involves the deposition of semen in the vagina of the cow, at the most appropriate time for acceptable conception rates. This is the same way conception is achieved after natural mating. However, this technique has been altered due to its low conception rates and high requirement of sperms. As a result, another technique called 'recto-vaginal technique' is quite popular today. This technique involves the insertion of a disposable, sterile catheter containing thawed semen into the 2

vagina of the cow. The catheter is then guided into the spiral folds of the cervix into the uterus, with the help of a gloved hand in the rectum. Some part of the semen is deposited inside the uterus, while the rest of it is left in the cervix as the catheter is withdrawn. In this process the animal are inseminated by frozen semen with the help of artificial instrument called A.I. gun. A.I. is a tool of breed improvement in animals. In this method of breeding the nondescript & low genetic potential animal (mostly cows and buffaloes) are inseminated by frozen semen of high yielding cows and buffaloes respectively. It results in birth of cross breed progeny from nondescript animal which is much better in terms of milk production & reproduction capacity in comparison to its mother. In India and Rajasthan the most popular cross breeds are Holstein Friesian and Jersey (Milk production is 6000 lit. in lactation period of 300 days) in cows and Murrah in buffaloes. In the process of artificial insemination first of all heat detection of animal is performed by A.I. worker by rectal palpation, then A.I. gun is loaded from frozen semen after thawing ( Process by which semen is brought up to atmospheric temperature to activate the sperm) and Finally insemination of animal. After two or three month of artificial insemination the animals are examined for confirm pregnancy i.e. called Pregnancy Diagnosis and after the end of gestation period of animal it gives birth to a cross breed calf. Advantages of Artificial Insemination The advantages of artificial insemination in cattle are as follows: Quality Sires: During natural breeding, males deposit more than the theoretically required quantities of semen into the female's reproductive tract for conception. A.I. method involves dilution of collected semen so as to create hundreds of doses from one ejaculate. Thus, A.I. makes superior sire semen to be available to hundreds of female cows. Artificial insemination in dairy cattle leads to sires of inheritance for butter fat and milk production.

Decreased Costs and Increased Safety: Bulls are bigger and stronger than cows and generally quite difficult to handle around the farm. Their aggressive nature can make them potential threats on the farm. However, A.I. eliminates the need to have a bull on the farm, as semen can be easily transported to various geographical areas. They can also be stored for a long period of time, which means the semen from a male can be used even after a bull's natural reproductive life ends. Since maintaining males costs quite a bit, A.I. decreases the overall costs on the farm. Reduction in Disease Transmission: The transfer of venereal diseases is quite likely to happen during natural mating. Certain pathogens can be transferred via the semen into the female, during A.I. as well, however, the screening done after semen collection prohibits this transfer. Genetic Selection Improvement: Since once released semen from male cattle is enough to produce more than hundreds of offspring, the best few males can be selected for breeding. This helps maintain the vigor of the cattle breed. Artificial insemination in beef cattle helps maintain the genetic pool, thereby obtaining the right strain of beef cattle required for meat production. Despite all the pros, A.I. do have its share of cons. Artificial insemination in cattle requires dexterity, patience, knowledge, experience as well as specialized equipments. Improper ways of carrying out A.I. in animal species, such as improper sterilization of equipments, insanitary conditions, etc. can nullify the efforts taken to obtain conception. The severe climatic conditions prevalent in most parts of India make transportation and preservation of semen difficult. Moreover, the need for superior germ plasm has reduced the market for bulls.

CHAPTER 2 REVIEW OF LITERATURE


Livestock play a key role in the lives of poor, rural people in developing countries (Delgado et al., 1999; FAO, 2002). The sale of animals provides a major proportion of annual cash income and capital assets of households, particularly in pastoral areas. In mixed farming systems, livestock are often the only source of draught power and fertilizer for crops, also utilizing crop residues after harvest (LiD, 1999; Steinfield et al., 2006). Livestock provide a safety net when crops fail but there are disease risks, and capital or credit is required to start up enterprises (Dolberg, 2001). International livestock research and development programmes aim to reduce poverty, but recent studies on programme effectiveness reveal little evidence of widespread impact on the livelihoods of the poor (LiD, 1999; Scoones & Wolmer, 2006). Reasons given include inappropriate technology, inability to deliver services to the poor, and domination by wealthier, more able or higher status farmers (LiD, 1999). Since participation in development projects is largely voluntary, it is often households who already have the capacity to participate that benefit the most (Christoplos & Farrington, 2004). India lives in villages as Mahatma Gandhi observed that the Real Picture of rural economy in India is clearly shown only by the strength of livestock and cattle production. At the world level the second largest producer of milch products is India but she is unstable to reap the real benefits because of the poor and inadequate infra-structural specialities the contribution of livestock to the agriculture sector stands at nearly 24 per cent. In this sector, the dairy subsector accounts for nearly two-thirds of the total livestock contribution. The track record of the dairy sector is impressive by any yardstick. The growth of the agricultural sector has been marginally higher than the growth of the population. But the growth of dairy sector has been at an encouraging 5 percent. This despite the fact that investment in animal husbandry and dairying during the Five Year Plans has ranged from 4.6 per cent (Seventh Plan) to 7 per cent (Third Plan) of the total investment made in agriculture.

India is characterized by the dry land/rain fed land that constitutes about 70% of the arable land. These areas face great instability in crop production due to erratic and inadequate rainfall. In the face of uncertainties in the crop production due to dry land/ rain fed farming, livestock production has been found to provide economic stability to the farmers. The dry land/rain fed land can sustain livestock better than crop production (Perumal, M. et al.). Livestock sector is a major factor in fulfilling the fat and protein requirement of a growing population. Against a world average of 25 grams per person per day of animal protein in diet, the Indian diet contains just 10gm. As such, the development of livestock is essential for maintaining the nutritional level, particularly of growing children and nursing mothers. This sector contributes 5.59 per cent of Indias GDP. It provides regular employment to about 11 million in principal status and 8 million in subsidiary status and 8 million in subsidiary status. Women constitute 69 per cent of the labour force in livestock section (Economic Survey, India, 2002-03, p.163). Livestock products belong to one such category of commodities, which if not handled properly, can perish soon. Further, unhygienic methods of handling of livestock products and produce from diseases animals also make the produce sub-standard in the international market. Organised slaughter of animal forms a negligible proportion. Most slaughter takes place in unorganised sector in clandestine ways in backyards and streets. Even in the case of official municipal abattoirs, modern facilities and hygienic conditions are not provided (Bhanja, S. K. 2000).

CHAPTER 3 METHODOLOGY OF THE STUDY


The researcher used the interview and the observation method to carry out the whole study. The interview method helped to learn about a sample population whereas observation method helped the researcher to gather more information in less time. 3.1 Methods of Research The researcher prepared different interview schedules for the villagers and stakeholders. Researcher used the sample survey method & at the same time kept eyes & ears opened and hence observed their activities simultaneously. 3.2 Selection of Samples and sample size Target villages for study were selected on the basis of taking core villages which were nearer to Hindustan Zinc Limited (HZL) within the radius of 4 km. So the selection of sample was done purposely after taking care of some factors. The researcher took care that the selection criteria of the sample did not affect the study and there would not be any kind of biasness in the selection process. The Programme was running in four districts of Rajasthan, which covers 26 villages of the Hindustan Zinc limited working in different areas. For the study all twenty six villages were taken. From four districts in which 20% of beneficiaries were taken as sample for data collection and in some villages 50% beneficiaries were taken. 3.3 Objectives of the study Every study starts with some objective to achieve. Although, the programme was running by HZL from last two years, it never got evaluated. And by completion of the study it was expected to achieve following objectives To generate information to strengthen existing planning which can bring major changes in livelihoods, which was focus on understanding of the livestock as second livelihood option. 7

To generate baseline data on livestock, livelihood and socio-economic condition of the targeted villages so as to understand the socio-economic status and income generation customs of the cattle owners.

To collect information on the disasters, diseases and outbreak of livestock and to find out the impact of livestock on the economy of the concerned areas.

3.4 Variables of Study: Activities undertaken during the period by the researcher: Door step services of artificial insemination, PD (pregnancy diagnosis), calf verification, calf rearing & management in cows & buffaloes for breed improvement. Organization of farmers training programme for awareness of integrated livestock development programme. Health coverage through de-worming (4 times) & vaccination (H.S., FMD & B.Q.) (2 times). Infertility & treatment camps including general diseases and nutritional support to milching animals. Concentrated feed support to pregnant animals & female calf. Fodder demonstration programme in cultivated & waste land. Insurance of cross breed & improved breed of cow & buffaloes female calf.

3.5: Methods for collecting Primary Data:

1. Interview Method The researcher adopted interview method to interview who


were main beneficiaries as well those who were less involved in the activites of HZL. The people in villages gave a clear understanding of the actors and factors in impact of livestock management.

2. Questionnaire & Schedule Methods Both the questionnaire & schedule which
Researcher prepared comprised of a list of questions arranged in a sequence pertaining to the investigation. This supplemented researcher in the dissertation by asking questions regarding households, income, A.I, vaccination, livestock asset, 8

and activities involved in training and camps from which the information thus obtained were tabulated.

3. Observation Method The researcher collected information by way of observing


people and their activities for more reliable data. Type of shed, economic status, education level etc, were observed closely by researcher for negligible human errors.

CHAPTER 4 ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE AND THE PROFILE OF THE LOCALE


Hindustan Zinc Ltd. (HZL) is a vertically integrated natural resources enterprise, headquartered at Udaipur, Rajasthan, and has broad operations ranging from exploration, mining, ore processing to smelting of non-ferrous metals The company is India's largest lead and zinc producer. 4.1 Vision Being regarded as a socially responsible corporate entity at par with global standards. 4.2 Mission Facilitate collaborative development for improving the quality of life of people at large, particularly in the neighborhood and state for achieving business goals and reputation management. 4.3 Approach and Strategy Companys approach towards community development is holistic, robust, integrated, intensive, long term and sustainable; based on the Public Private Partnership (PPP) model. They use intensive intervention in select villages identified through an indicator driven process designated as the Integrated Village Development Program. In all other villages they have an extensive approach. Internal reviews and social audits are periodically conducted to facilitate transfer of autonomy to the villages and expand their reach. They measure their social and economic impacts, engage openly with communities and other stakeholders and aim to contribute to the development of sustainable communities. Corporate Social Responsibility is an integral part of their business which is accorded as much important as a business project. They have undertaken several projects for 10

sustainable socio-economic development of weaker section of society in the operational villages. Reaching to more than 500,00 people Positively impacting lives of over 54,209 families They are the members of National Population Stabilization Fund, United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) and The Energy and Resources Institute Business Council for Sustainable Development (TERI-BCDS) Their initiatives are prioritized on local needs which focuses mainly on 1. Education 2. Health & Nutrition and 3. Sustainable Livelihood They respond to community needs and concerns, along with any related impacts, risks and opportunities for their operations, in close co-operation with the communities, as well as governments, non-governmental organizations, development organizations and likeminded partners. 4.4 AREA OF STUDY My study area was confined to the various blocks of the Udaipur, Rajsamand, Bhilwara, Chittaurgarh district which is located in the Aravalli hill. It is one of the 33 districts of Rajasthan state in western India. The historical city of Udaipur is the administrative headquarters of the district. Udaipur district comprises seven sub-divisions: Girwa, Kherwada, Mavli, Vallabhnagar, Kotda, Jhadol and Salumber. These sub-divisions are further divided in to 11 tehsils. Latitude and Longitude of Udaipur is 24058 N and 73068 E respectively. The Latitude and Longitude of Rajsamand is 25004 N and 73053 E respectively. The Latitude and Longitude of Bhilwara is 25021 N and 74040 E respectively. The Latitude and Longitude of Chittaurgarh is 24054 N and 74042 E respectively. Being located in the desert lands of Rajasthan, the climate and weather of Udaipur is usually hot. The climate of study area is tropical. The summer season runs from mid March to June and touches the temperature 11

of min. 28.80C and max. 380C. The winter season touches the temperature of min.11.60C max.28.30C. The city annually receives around 637 mm of rainfall. 4.5 GROUP SOCIAL POLICY Environment, Occupational Health, Safety, Security and Community Policy HZL believes in sustainable development in harmony with nature and accordingly, is committed to the effective management of health, security and safety of all its employees, protecting its surrounding environment and making a contribution to the development of the local community. This commitment encompasses efficient use of natural resources, protection of assets and provision of a safe workplace with support systems for zero harm to the environment. Accordingly, HZL will strive to: Maintaining management systems for health, safety, security, environment and the community that are in compliance with law and consistent with world-class standards like ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001. Developing a working culture conducive to continuous improvements in performance without compromising with safety, security and health of its employees and its commitment to develop in harmony with nature. 4.6 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR) With the introduction of Global Compact towards the end of the century the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been reinforced. The modern corporation has grown phenomenally impacting various constituencies of civil society. The social obligation of the corporation was highlighted as a proactive step to certain practices of business which undermine human rights, healthcare, labor standards, environments, poverty, and minimum education among others. One of the developments has been creation of voluntary organizations, which serve the underprivileged sections of civil society. The campaign of CSR has been actively supported by multilateral agencies like the World Bank, OECD, and The European commission, among others. In fact, in present 12

times CSR roles and responsibilities of large corporations have been explicitly identified and evolved world-wide. In order to minimize the incidence of corporate governance problems, guidelines and codes based on country experiences are being adopted both by developed and developing countries. In fact, even before the world-wide debate started some large companies and multinationals all over the world were already engaged in corporate philanthropy. However, as the community and stakeholders expectations become more and more diverse, it became necessary to mandate the corporation to respond to these requirements. Since the 1990s a number of developments such as increasing democratization of governments, creation of newer social and economic institutions, rapid growth of volunteerism in the form of non-profit organizations, rapid growth of volunteerism in the form of non-profit organizations, increasing consumer awareness, focus on the need for reducing poverty, dealing with the human rights issues, among others, have reinforced the need to articulate policies and actions to incorporate corporate action and emphasized the concept and practice of corporate responsiveness. Since corporations have social obligation, the concept of corporate social performance has been advocated which would enable the corporations to focus on the required content of corporate social action. The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) has defined corporate social responsibility as the commitment of business to contribute to sustainable economic development. The primary purpose of CSR is to engage with the internal and external stakeholder. CSR is concerned with treating the stakeholders of the firm ethically or in a socially responsible manner. The aim of social responsibility is to create higher standards of living, while preserving the profitability of the corporation. CSR measures should focus on benefiting people and communities other than those whom they (the company) are contractually obliged to, namely, those who are socially and/or economically disadvantages.

13

CHAPTER 5 FINDINGS AND ANALYSIS


The overall implementation of the project was accessed by monitoring the various performance indicators involved. All the activities signed under MoU between HZL and BAIF benefited livestock and gave livelihood option to the beneficiaries. The stakeholders were interviewed which included doctors, BAIF employees, beneficiaries and coordinators and based on their answers and the researchers observations, the real impact in terms of performance of the project was brought on the forefront. Number of years since all the activities were done in different villages nearby HZL: Since October 2009 till May 2011, the intervention of HZL which covers all activities signed under MoU was in 21 villages. In other villages which were additional villages, few activities were done like A.I. and Camp. In every unit all activities had target and to achieve that all activities was done in the best possible manner to bring the good outcome and as a result in A.I., Concentrate feed support to cow and buffalo, De-worming and Vaccinations activities, the achievement was acquired more than target in all the units. The achievement gained by HZL became the Total universe size as per HZL's achievement in which researcher covered five samples from each village of all units and that became researcher sample size or in other words the total achievement gained by HZL became researcher Target and out of that researcher covered five beneficiaries which became the sample size of researcher impact study of Livestock Management. 5.1. Livestock Possessed The households had cow, bullock, goat and buffalo which were of local and hybrid variety and they were there from the earlier times in their houses, those houses engaged in agricultural activities had bullock with them. The total number of livestock possessed were covered from the total universe size of beneficiaries as per HZL's intervened villages in which researcher covered five samples from each village.During the survey, researcher came to know about population of livestock which can be seen through graph 14

and Buffaloes were more in number among other livestocks as can be seen in figure no. 1.1 among which chanderia consisted of highest number of buffaloes.

Livestock Possessed
100 90 80 70 In Numbers 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Cow Bullock Goat Buffalo Dariba 50 27 14 68 Zawar 28 19 72 20 Debari 48 12 13 35 Agucha 48 4 53 24 Chanderia 50 8 23 87

Figure 5.1: Livestock possessed in all units. 5.2. Types of Shed The arrangement of shed was of prime importance for the livestock keeping. The shed arrangements for the livestock were mainly made up of straw. Basically the farm cattle such as cow, buffalo and bullock were kept under shed and goats were kept in houses, it also prevented them from falling prey to animals such as dogs from the nearby. Figure 5.2 shows the type of shed in all units for which researcher took five samples from each village from the total universe size of the beneficiaries as per HZLs intervened villages.

15

Types of Shed
35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Households

Straw Shed 33 16 8 15 11

Having Tiles Roof Cow, Bullock, Buffalo,Goat 2 1 9 1 9

In Home 0 1 0 4 0

Dariba Zawar Debari Agucha Chanderia

Figure 5.2: Types of shed in all units. 5.3. Livestock Assets in all units 5.3.1. Livestock Assets in RDM unit Total number of samples covered in this unit was five from each village taking different parameter. This figure shows the details of assets both of hybrid and local breed in Dariba unit. Local breed of buffalo is higher in number than hybrid and in more in number in Mahenduriya village which is nearest village to Hindustan zinc limited.

Naya Mahend Mata ji Sindesar Suneria Makhan Rajpura Dariba uriya khera khurd kher puria cow local 4 5 2 2 2 9 5 cow hybrid 6 5 6 3 4 1 1 buffalo local 9 16 1 3 5 8 3 buffalo hybrid 2 3 3 3 6 0 9

18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

cow local cow hybrid buffalo local buffalo hybrid

Figure 5.3.1. (a): Livestock assets in RDM Unit. 16

5.3.2. Livestock Assets in ZM Unit In ZM unit, the sample size for each village was five and it was observed that the number of no. of hybrid cow and buffalo had been observed more in Oda village which is an additional village as compared to other villages. It can be also seen from figure no. 5.3.2. that the no. hybrid cows were more as compared to hybrid buffaloes that was 18 . As it can be seen in the graph local breed of cow and buffalo were more than hybrid cow and buffalo in Zawar unit.

Livestock assets in Zawar unit


12 10 Numbers 8 6 4 2 0 Rawa Cow (Local) Cow (Hybrid) Buffalo (Local) 1 0 0 Kanpur 8 2 4 Newatalai 5 0 6 Krishanpu Singatwad ra a 9 3 3 4 3 6

Oda 1 10 1

Figure 5.3.2 : Livestock assets in ZM unit 5.3.3 Livestock Assets in Debari Unit Debari was observed to have the highest number of hybid cows as compared to hybrid buffalos among which gowala futia scored more value than other village. The sample size for each village took by researcher for study was five which showed that there was no hybrid cow and buffaloes in Godwa.

17

Livestock assets in Debari unit


18 16 14 12 Numbers 10 8 6 4 2 0 Local Cow Bichhri Chhota Goda Gowala futia Godwa 7 1 2 6 8 8 16 0 3 4 15 3 Hybrid Local Buffalo 11 1 1 0 Hybrid

Figure 5.3.3: Livestock assets in ZSD unit. 5.3.4 Livestock Assets in RAM Unit: In RAM unit, the sample size for each village was five and it was observed that more no. of hybrid cows were found in Khatikheda village and maximum number of hybrid buffaloes were found in Rampura village. It had been also seen during survey that in Rampura village, local breed of cow and buffaloes were not seen. In this unit as it can been seen from the graph (figure no 5.3.4) that more number of hybrid cow were present there as compared to local and hybrid breed of cow and buffalo.

18

Livetock assets in Agucha unit


16 14 12

Numbers

10 8 6 4 2 0 Local Cow 0 4 2 8 Hybrid 2 10 8 14 Local Buffalo 0 3 1 3 7 3 6 1 Hybrid

Rampura Khedapalola Sultanpura Khatikheda

Figure 5.3.4: Livestock assets in RAM Unit. 5.3.5 Livestock Assets in CLZS unit: Chanderia unit was last unit covered by researcher in which five villages were taken as sample village and five beneficiaries were taken from each village for study purpose. It was found that hybrid buffalos were more in number in Salera (40) and less in Billia (3) village. Figure 5.3.5 shows all those data that was obserbed which also shows that more no. of hybrid buffaloes were present as compare to hybrid and local cow and local buffalo.

19

Livestock assets in Chanderia unit


45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Numbers

Local Cow 9 5 8 6

Hybrid 7 6 2 7

Local Buffalo 2 15 10 9

Hybrid 3 40 6 7

Billia Salera Ganeshpura Mungga ka Khera

Figure 5.3.5 : Livestock assets in CLZS Unit. 5.4. Calf details in all unit 5.4.1. Calf Details in RDM unit: Calf baby was sold in Makkanpuria only among all sample took by researcher which can be seen in figure 5.4.1 which was five from each village. No. of calf were found more in Rajpura village. In this unit cattle owners prefer to retain calf. Out of 24 calvess, there was only one male calf which has been sold in Rs. 10,000.00.

Calf details in Dariba unit


7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Numbers

Naya Mahendu Mata ji Dariba riya Khera 0 0 4 0 4 0

Sindesar Suneria Khurd Khera 2 0 2 0

Rajpura 6 0

Makhanp uria 5 1

Calf Retained Calf sold

Figure 5.4.1: Calf details of RDM unit. 20

5.4.2. Calf Details in ZM Unit : Calves was sold in each villages except Rawa village. The more number of calf retained in Singhatwada with respect to other villages which can be seen in figure no. 5.4.2. Out of 46 calves 10 calves had been sold at different price (Rs. 8,000.00, Rs. 10,000.00, Rs. 12,000.00) and 36 calves were retained by cattle owners.

Calf details in Zawar unit


12 10 8 Numbers 6 4 2 0 Rawa Calf Retained Calf sold 2 0 Kanpur 5 1 Newatalai 7 1 Krishanpur Singatwad a a 7 3 10 2

Oda 5 3

Figure 5.4.2: Calf details of ZM Unit. 5.4.3. Calf Details in ZSD Unit : It had been observed that no. of calf retained were more in Bichhri village as compare to other village which can be seen in figure 5.4.3. Only in Chhota Goda calf baby was sold and reason behind that the only male calf was there.

21

Calf details in Debari unit


20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Calf Retained Calf Sold

Numbers

Bichhri 18 0

Chhota Goda 9 1

Gowala futia 13 0

Godwa 0 0

Figure 5.4.3: Calf details of ZSD Unit. 5.4.4. Calf Details in RAM unit: The researcher observed that the total no. of calves retained and sold in Sultanpura village was maximum than other villages of Agucha because no. of male calves were more in Sultanpura village as can be seen in figure no. 5.4.4 .

Calf details in Agucha unit


12 10 Numbers 8 6 4 2 0 Calf Retained Calf Sold Rampura 5 0 Khedapalola 7 1 Sultanpura 11 8 Khatikheda 9 0

Figure: 5.4.4: Calf details of RAM Unit.

22

5.4.5

Calf Details in CLZS unit :

In CLZS unit, the sample size for each village was five and it had been observed that in Chanderiya unit, the total number of calf retained and sold were more in Salera village. The total no. of male calves in Agucha unit was found in Salera village as can be seen in figure 5.4.5.

Calf details in Chanderia unit


20 18 16 14 Numbers 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Billia Calf Retained Calf Sold 8 0 Salera 18 5 Ganeshpura 10 1 Mungga ka Khera 7 1

Figure 5.4.5: Calf details of CLZS unit. 5.4.6: Calf details in Billiya Village: In Chanderiya unit, I found in my survey that number of buffaloes increased from 15 to 81 from October 2009 to May 2011 in Billiya village, CLZS as can be seen in figure no. 5.4.6. Out of 81 buffaloes 20 were female calf. Only one female buffalo died which had been insurance earlier.

23

Billiya Village
50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Male Tolal Cattle Owners DATA 43 0 1 Died Female Died

IN NUMBERS

Male Calves

Female Calves

Number of buffaloes 47 3 9 26

Figure 5.4.6: Calf details of Billiya village of CLZS Unit. 5.5. Use of livestock in all units: 5.5.1 Use of livestock in RDM unit: In RDM Unit, the total number of milching cow and buffalo were found more in Mahenduriya village as compared to other villages in Dariba unit as can be seen in figure no. 5.5.1 (a).

Use of livestock in Dariba unit


No. of milching cattles 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Naya Mahendur Mata ji Dariba iya Khera 0 0 7 10 17 14 19 33 9 4 13

Sindesar Khurd 5 5 10

Suneria Khera 8 5 13

Rajpura 12 6 18

Makhanpu ria 3 7 10

cow Buffalo Total

Figure 5.5.1 (a): Use of livestock in RDM unit. 24

As per graph (figure no 5.5.1(b)), it can be seen that milk was being produced in each village but sold in Naya Dariba, Mahenduriya, and Makkanpuri villages. In other villages it had been used for their own consumption. The selling price of milk per lit is Rs. 20.00.

Livestock product and sale in Dariba unit


80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Milk in Lit.

Naya Mahend Mata ji Sindesar Suneria Makhanp Rajpura Dariba uriya Khera Khurd Khera uria 45 18 27 20 72 25 47 20 38 38 0 0 22 22 0 0 33 33 0 0 32 32 0 0 47 4 43 20

Milk (Lit/Day) Own Consumption Sell (Lit/Day) Price/Lit.

Figure 5.5.1 (b): Details of Livestock product and sale in RDM unit. 5.5.2. Use of livestock in ZM unit: The total milching cattles were more in Singhatwada village as compared to other villages. In Oda village total number of milching cow and buffalo were more. As per graph (figure no. 5.5.2 (a)), we can see the total number of milching cow is more than milching buffalo.

Use of livestock in Zawar unit


No. of milching cattles 10 8 6 4 2 0 Cow Buffalo Total 0 0 Rawa 0 0 0 Kanpur 2 1 3 Newatalai Krishanpura Singatwada 0 2 2 4 3 7 4 4 8 Oda 6 1 7

Figure 5.5.2. (a): use of livestock in ZM unit.

25

In the ZM unit, the milk production was high in Oda and Krishanpura as can be seen in figure 5.5.2 (b) and as a result milk was sold in Oda and Kishanpura and the unit price was Rs. 20.00 per liter.

Livestock product and sale in Zawar unit


70 60

Milk in Lit.

50 40 30 20 10 0 Rawa Kanpur Newatalai 9 9 0 0 9 9 0 0 Krishanpur Singatwad a a 36 6 30 20 24 24 0 0

Oda 62 12 50 20

Milk (Lit/Day) Own Consumption Sell (Lit/day) Price/ Lit.

0 0 0 0

Figure 5.5.2 (b): Details of Livestock product and sale in ZM unit. 5.4.6 Use of livestock in ZSD unit:

In ZSD unit, Goval Futia village was found to had highest number of milching cow. Milching buffalo was more in number in Bicchari village as obserbed by researcher taking five sample from each village. It can also be seen that the milching cattles were less in Godwa village with respect to other villages.

26

Use of livestock in Debari unit


30 No. of milching cattles 25 20 15 10 5 0 Cow Buffalo Total 0 0 Bichhri 14 10 24 Chhota Goda 3 2 5 Gowala futia 15 8 23 Godwa 1 0 1

Figure 5.5.3 (a): Use of Livestock in ZSD Unit In ZSD unit, milk production and its selling was observed more in Bichhri and Govala Futia village as can be seen in figure no. 5.5.3 (b). Dairy work take place on large scale in Govala Futia village.

Livestock product and sale in Debari unit


200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Bichhri Milk (Lit./Day) Own Consumption Sell (Lit./day) Price/Lit. 179 30 149 20

Milk in Lit.

Chhota Goda 25 9 16 20

Gowala futia 174 18 156 25

Godwa 1 1 0 0

Figure 5.5.3 (b): Details of Livestock product and sale in ZSD Unit.

27

5.4.7

Use of Livestock in RAM unit:

In Agucha Unit, the total number of milching cow were observed more in Khedapalola and Sultanpura village as can be seen in figure no. 5.5.4 (a). The number of milching buffalo were found more in Rampura as compare to other villages. As it can be seen from the graph that total number of milching cow was observed more as compared to milching buffalo.

Use of livestock in Agucha unit


14 12 No. of milching cattles 10 8 6 4 2 0 Cow Buffalo Total 0 0 Rampura 7 6 13 Khedapalola 10 2 12 Sultanpura 10 3 13 Khatikheda 3 3 6

Figure 5.5.4 (a): Use of Livestock in RAM Unit. In Agucha unit, milk production was good in all villages of Agucha with respect to other villages. The maximum sell of milk was in Rampura village. Milk selling was the alternate livelihood option for the farmers as shown in figure no. 5.5.4 (b).

28

Livestock product and sale in Agucha unit


90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Milk (Lit./day) Own Consumption Sell (Lit./day) Price/Lit.

Milk in Lit.

Rampura 77 13 64 20

Khedapalola 55 5 50 20

Sultanpura 41 8 33 20

Khatikheda 45 11 34 20

Figure 5.5.4 (b): Details of Livestock product and sale in RAM Unit. 5.4.8 Use of livestock in CLZS Unit:

Cattle owner preferred more number of buffaloes due to its high quantity of milk production as livelihood and it was more in Salera village for both cow and buffaloes.

Use of livestock in Chanderia unit


25 No. of milching cattles 20 15 10 5 0 Billia cow Buffalo Total 0 0 5 1 6 Salera 4 17 21 Ganeshpura 3 6 9 Mungga ka Khera 5 4 9

Figure 5.5.5 (a): Use of Livestock in CLZS Unit. 29

In Chanderia unit, milk production was good in all villages of Chanderia. The maximum sell of milk was in Salera village as in figure no. 5.5.5 (b). Here, Milk selling was the alternate livelihood option for the farmers. Here own consumption of milk was less than sale of milk.

Livestock product and sale in Chanderia unit


70 60 50 Milk in Lit. 40 30 20 10 0 Billia Milk (Lit/day) Own consumption Sell (Lit./day) Price/Lit. 38 5 33 20 Salera 64 12 52 20 Ganeshpura 40 8 32 20 Mungga ka Khera 46 8 38 20

Figure 5.5.5 (b): Details of Livestock product and sale in CLZS Unit. 5.6. A.I. activities in all the units: HZLs target and achievement can be seen from figure 5.6. (a). Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was researcher target which is presented in figure 5.6. (b) for which researcher had taken five samples from each village in each unit. In form of percentage it can be seen in figure 5.6 (c). In the graph it can be seen that A.I. activities which took place from October 09 to April 11 in five units with its target and achievement.

30

Figure 5.6. (a) shows unit wise A.I. activities details taking showing both target and achievement of Hindustan zinc limited. Maximum target was achieved by Chanderiya and least by Zawar unit. Note: The reason behind more than 100% achievement by all units is that earlier this programme was running as a pilot programme and it ran successfully and with the intervention in core village it added more than 100% in their A.I. activities.

UNITWISE AI ACTIVITIES
1600 1400 1200 IN NUMBERS 1000 800 600 400 200 0 TARGET ACHIEVE % RDM 475 1029 216.63 ZSD 450 786 174.67 ZM 100 201 201 CLZS 450 1451 322.44 RAM 550 1105 200.91

Figure 5.6 (a): Unit wise A.I. activities details (HZLs Target and Achievement) Figure 5.6 (b) shows total percentage of A.I. activities covered by researcher in all units among all units maximum percentage of A.I. was covered in Dariba.

31

OUR COVERAGE IN AI ACTIVITIES


1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 Total universe size as per HZL's achievement our coverage % IN NUMBERS

RDM 1029 112 10.88

ZSD 786 51 6.49

ZM 201 46 22.89

CLZS 1451 46 3.17

RAM 1105 46 4.16

Figure 5.6 (b): Unit wise A.I. activities details (from survey) As per graph (figure 5.6 (c)), the A.I. activities in cow and buffalo can be seen separately. It was researcher total A.I. achievement coverage Maximum A.I. activity in cow in Dariba and lowest in Chanderiya but it is vice versa in case of buffalo.

UNITWISE AI ACTIVITIES (IN COW & BUFFALO)


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 COW BUFF TOTAL COW % BUFF % IN NUMBERS

RDM 89 23 112 79.46 20.54

ZSD 38 13 51 74.51 25.49

ZM 30 16 46 65.22 34.78

CLZS 26 20 46 56.52 43.48

RAM 33 13 46 71.74 28.26

Figure 5.6 (c): Unit wise A.I. activities details in cow and buffalo (our coverage in %) 32

5.6.1. A.I. activities details of all units: Artificial insemination (A.I.) was main activity in all units. Repeat was done in case the A.I. was not successful first time and it is shown in figure that its frequency decreased and chances of confirmed pregnancy (C.P.) increased in all units. Utmost number of A.I. was there in Dariba unit and least repeat of A.I took place in Zawar.

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Dariba zawar Dabari Dariba zawar Dabari

Murrah 23 16 13

Gir 0 4 1

H.F 22 14 25

jersey 10 4 5

N.D 59 5 7

Figure 5.6.1 (a): A.I. in livestock in allUnits (includes Repeat and confirm pregnancy) Different breed of livestock in which A.I. was done in buffalo was Murrah and in cow were Gir, H.F., Jersey. N.D. (non-descript) was huge in number in Dariba. Murrah and H.F. was mostly preferred by cattle owner in all units due its high milk production. After, H.F. other breed which preferred was Gir because of its disease resistant ability. In Dariba unit, total number of Murrah 23, Jersy 10, H.F. 20 and N.D. 59. In Mahenduriya village, H.F. is more in number. In Makkhanpuria and Suneriya khera village, maximum no. of Murrah was found. 33

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Dariba zawar Dabari Agucha chanderia Dariba zawar Dabari Agucha chanderia Murrah 23 16 13 13 17 Gir 0 4 1 9 3 H.F 22 14 25 14 12 jersey 10 4 5 3 4 N.D 59 5 7 7 1

Figure 5.6.1 (b): Breed wise A.I. details in livestock in all Units. 5.7 Vaccination activities in all units Vaccination takes place twice a year in all five units for HS, BQ and FMD. HZLs target and achievement can be seen from figure 5.7 (a). Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was researcher target in figure no. 5.7 (b) and for this researcher took five samples from each village in each unit for which three figure can be seen one for HS in figure no. 5.7 (c),for BQ in figure no. 5.7 (d) and in case of FMD in figure no. 5.7 (e). The highest target was achieved by Dariba.

34

UNITWISE VACCINATION ACTIVITIES


1600 1400 1200 NUMBERRS 1000 800 600 400 200 0 T 250 800 200 300 0 A H.S CLZS ZSD ZM RAM RDM 1244 750 240 640 1500 497.60 93.75 120.00 213.33 1500 250 800 200 300 0 % T A B.Q. 1244 750 240 640 1500 497.60 93.75 120.00 213.33 1500 250 1200 200 300 0 % T A F.M.D. 800 800 380 344 1000 320.00 66.67 190.00 114.67 1000 %

Figure 5.7 (a): Unit wise Vaccination activities details (HZLs Target and Achievement)

Note: The reason behind more than 100% achievement by all units except ZSD unit was that, earlier this programme was running as a pilot programme and it ran successfully and with the intervention in core village it added more than 100% in their Vaccination activities.

35

UNITWISE OUR COVERAGE IN VACCINATION ACTIVITIES


1600

1400

1200

1000 IN NUMBERS

800

600

400

200

Total universe size our coverage as per HZL's achievement H.S. 1244 750 240 640 1500 178 86 81 72 126

Total universe size our coverage as per HZL's achievement B.Q. 1244 750 240 640 1500 178 86 81 72 126

Total universe size our coverage as per HZL's achievement F.M.D. 800 800 380 344 1000 178 86 81 72 126

CLZS ZSD ZM RAM RDM

14.31 11.47 33.75 11.25 8.40

14.31 11.47 33.75 11.25 8.40

22.25 10.75 21.32 20.93 12.60

Figure 5.7 (b): Unit wise Vaccination activities details (from survey)

UNITWISE H.S. COVERAGE (in %)


40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 33.75

H.S. (in %) 14.31 11.47 11.25 ZM RAM

8.4 RDM

CLZS

ZSD

Figure 5.7 (c): Unit wise H.S. Vaccination activities coverage details in % (from survey)

36

UNITWISE B.Q. COVERAGE (in %)


40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 CLZS ZSD ZM RAM RDM 14.31 11.47 11.25 8.4 B.Q. (in %) 33.75

Figure 5.7 (d): Unit wise BQ Vaccination activities coverage details in % (from survey)

UNITWISE F.M.D. COVERAGE (in %)


25 20 15 10 5 0 CLZS ZSD ZM RAM RDM 10.75 12.6 F.M.D. % 22.25 21.32 20.93

Figure 5.7 (e): Unit wise FMD Vaccination activities coverage details in percentage (from survey) 5.8 De-worming activities details of all units: De-worming was vital activity of Hindustan zinc limited (HZL) similar to vaccination which was organized two times in a year. Figure 5.8 (a) shows total achievement of HZL with respect to its target. Total target achieved by researcher is shown in Figure 5.8 (b) and

37

(c) which shows that maximum number of samples was undertaken by researcher under study in all respective units. Note: The reason behind more than 100% achievement in CLZS, ZSD and RDM units was that, earlier this programme was running as a pilot programme and it ran successfully and with the intervention in core village it added more than 100% in their de-worming activities.

UNITWISE DE-WORMING ACTIVITIES


1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 TARGET ACHIEVE % IN NUMBERS

CLZS 450 530 117.78

ZSD 1600 1200 75

ZM 200 200 100

RAM 300 300 100

RDM 475 622 130.95

Figure 5.8 (a): Unit wise De-worming activities details (HZLs Target and Achievement)

UNITWISE OUR COVERAGE IN DEWORMING ACTIVITIES


1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 Total universe size as per HZL's achievement our coverage % IN NUMBERS

CLZS 530 137 25.85

ZSD 1200 83 6.92

ZM 200 48 24

RAM 300 72 24

RDM 622 118 18.97

Figure 5.8 (b): Unit wise De-worming activities details (from survey)

38

5.9 Mode of Treatment details of all units : Once a year government provides facilities for treatment of livestock and in other season cattle owners go to private hospitals which are expensive. After intervention of Hindustan zinc limited cattle owners get utmost benefit by their facilities both in awareness and treatment. In all intervened villages of Hindustan zinc limited cattle owners prefer modern treatment after its intervention. Only few samples of Dariba and Debari village was found practicing traditional treatment.

Mode of treatment in each unit


9 8 7 In Numbers 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Government HZL Traditional Modern Daiba 0 8 6 7 Zawar 0 8 0 6 Debari 0 8 3 4 Agucha 0 8 0 4 Chanderia 2 8 0 4

Figure 5.9: Mode of treatment in all units (from survey) 5.10 Infertility Treatment Camp activities details of all units:

Infertility camp takes place 4 times a year in all five units after every three month at its scheduled time which handles seasonal disease on time. From Figure 5.10 (a) it is seen that 100% target was achieved by Hindustan Zinc Limited in all respective units which decreased the rate of mortality and morbidity. Researcher took five samples from each village in which maximum target was achieved in Zawar unit shown in figure 5.10 (b).

39

UNITWISE I.T. CAMP


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 TARGET ACHIEVE % IN NUMBERS

CLZS 20 20 100

ZSD 20 20 100

ZM 16 16 100

RAM 20 20 100

RDM 30 30 100

Figure 5.10 (a): Unit wise Infertility Treatment camp activities details (HZLs Target and Achievement)

UNITWISE OUR COVERAGE IN I.T. CAMP


60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Total universe size as per HZL's achievement our coverage % IN NUMBERS

CLZS 20 9 45

ZSD 20 9 45

ZM 16 8 50

RAM 20 9 45

RDM 30 10 33.3

Figure 5.10 (b): Unit wise Infertility Treatment Camp activities details (from survey) 5.11 Fodder Demonstration activities details of all units: Green fodder demonstration was another vital activity in which seeds were distributed among cattle owners who had land so that they can utilize maximum from it and through it awareness among other cattle owner was generated. Fodder demonstration activity achievement with respect to its target is shown in figure 5.11 (a) of Hindustan zinc limited. 40

UNITWISE FODDER DEMONSTRATION


120 100 IN NUMBERS 80 60 40 20 0 TARGET ACHIEVE % CLZS 40 40 100 ZSD 25 25 100 ZM 25 25 100 RAM 11 11 100 RDM 50 50 100

Figure 5.11 (a): Unit wise fodder demonstration activities details (HZLs target and achievement) Researcher took five sample from each village intervened by Hindustan Zinc Limited to study fodder demonstration activities. In RDM unit all 11 beneficiaries was covered by researcher as compared to other units.

UNITWISE OUR COVERAGE IN FODDER DEMONSTRATION


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Total universe size as per HZL's achievement our coverage % IN NUMBERS

CLZS 40 16 40

ZSD 25 13 52

ZM 25 15 60

RAM 11 11 100

RDM 50 25 50

Figure 5.11 (b): Unit wise fodder demonstration activities details (from survey)

41

5.12. Farmer Exposure Visit activities details in all units: Farmer exposure visit is organized to bring behavioral change among cattle owners for which they were taken for visit to Anand dairy in Gujarat and to Karnal in Haryana. Number of beneficiaries benefited from hindustan zinc limited is shown in figure 5.12 (a) and unitwise coverage of researcher is shown in figure 5.12 (b).

UNITWISE FARMER EXPOSURE VISIT


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 TARGET ACHIEVE % IN NUMBERS

CLZS 25 25 100

ZSD 25 25 100

ZM 100 100 100

RAM 60 60 100

RDM 60 60 100

Figure 5.12 (a): Unit wise farmer exposure visit activities details (HZLs target and achievement)

UNITWISE OUR COVERAGE IN FARMER EXPOSURE VISIT


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Total universe size as per HZL's achievement our coverage % IN NUMBERS

CLZS 25 9 36

ZSD 25 6 24

ZM 100 20 20

RAM 60 21 35

RDM 60 20 33.33

Figure: 5.12 (b): Unit wise farmer exposure visit activities details (from survey) 42

5.12.1 Farmer Training Program activities details in all units: This graph shows target and achievement of HZL in farmer training program which takes place for one day in a year in all five units. The target set was different for all units. HZLs target and achievement can be seen from figure 5.12.1 (a). Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target which is presented in figure 5.12.1 (b) with my coverage area for which I had taken five sample from each village in each unit. It can be seen in percentage form also in figure 5.12.1 (c). In CLZS unit, the target which was decided to achieve in a year was 65 out of which they achieved 65 that was 100% achievement. Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target where I covered 10 cattle owner who attended this training which is 15% of total during survey. In ZSD unit, the target which was decided to achieve in a year was 125 out of which there achievement was 75 that is 60% of the target. Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target where I covered 6 cattle owner who attended this training which is 8% of total during survey. In ZM unit, the target which was decided to achieve in a year was 25 out of which they achieved 25 that was 100% achievement. Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target where I covered 8 cattle owner who attended this training which is 32% of total during survey. In RAM unit, the target which was decided to achieve in a year was 75 out of which they achieved 75 that was 100% achievement. Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target where I covered 11 cattle owner who attended this training which is 15% of total during survey. In RDM unit, the target which was decided to achieve in a year was 150 out which there achievement was 100 that is 67% of the target. Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target where I covered 28 cattle owner who attended this training which is 28% of total during survey.

43

UNITWISE FARMER TRAINING PROG.


160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

IN NUMBERS

CLZS 65 65 100

ZSD 125 75 60

ZM 25 25 100

RAM 75 75 100

RDM 150 100 66.67

TARGET ACHIEVE %

Figure 5.12.1 (a): Unit wise farmer training programme activities details (HZLs target and achievement)

UNITWISE OUR COVERAGE IN F.T.P.


120 100 IN NUMBERS 80 60 40 20 0 Total universe size as per HZL's achievement our coverage % CLZS 65 10 15.38 ZSD 75 6 8 ZM 25 8 32 RAM 75 11 14.67 RDM 100 28 28

Figure 5.12.1 (b): Unit wise farmer training programme activities details (from survey) 44

5.13 Insurance activity details in each unit: HZLs target and achievement can be seen from figure 5.13 (a). Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target which is presented in figure 5.13 (b) with my coverage area for which I had taken five sample from each village in each unit. In form of percentage it can be seen in figure 5.13 (c). As per graph the insurance covered by five units can be seen as follows: In CLZS unit, the target for insurance was 27 out of which they achieved 27 that are 100% target had been achieved. Now, out of 27 insurance female calves only 26 are present there in which one died. Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target out of which I covered 12 insurance female calves during my survey which was 46%. In RAM unit, the target for insurance was 11 out of which they achieved 11 that are 100% target had been achieved. Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target out of which I covered 11 insurance female calves during our survey which was 100%. In RDM unit the target for insurance was 6 out of which they achieved 6 that are 100% target had been achieved. Total universe size as per HZLs achievement was my target out of which I covered 6 insurance female calves during our survey which was 100%.In ZSD and ZM unit, no insurance have been done till now.

Unitwise Insurence covered


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 TARGET ACHIEVE % in number

CLZS 27 26 96.2962963

ZSD 0 0 0

ZM 0 0 0

RAM 11 11 100

RDM 6 6 100

Figure 5.13(a): Unit wise insurance activities details (HZLs target and achievement) 45

Unitwise our coverage in insurence activity


120 100 80 in number 60 40 20 0 Total universe size as per HZL's achievement our coverage % CLZS 26 12 46.15384615 ZSD 0 0 0 ZM 0 0 0 RAM 11 11 100 RDM 6 6 100

Figure 5.13 (b): Unit wise insurance activities details (from survey)

5.14 Problems details of all units: In livestock management, different problems can be seen in different units which include non availability of fodder, scarcity of fund, lack of knowledge about health and care, poor accessibility of extension services which can be seen in figure 5.14 for which researcher had five sample from each village in all five units. These poor accessibility of extension service included the limited medicines which were distributed through camp. Due to limited number of medicines, few cattle owner returned back without taking medicines.

46

Problems
30 No. of Benificieries 25 20 15 10 5 0 Non availability of fodder Dariba Zawar Debari Agucha Chanderia 15 20 7 15 20 Scarcity of fund 27 10 2 6 2 Lack of knowledge about health and care 6 5 2 3 3 Poor accessibility of extension Service 10 17 0 2 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0

Figure 5.14: Problems details in all the units. GENERAL FINDINGS: In each unit maximum number of H.F and Murrah breed is there. Maximum number of hybrid cow is there as compared to hybrid buffaloes. In Agucha unit, maximum number of Gir is there as compared to other unit. Those villages in which A.I. took place in maximum number had highest production of milk and dairy work is more in those villages. Like in Oda (Zawar), Salera (Chanderia), Sultanpura (Agucha), Bicchari and Govala Futia (Debari). Vaccination took place in each village now and previously also at scheduled time. Only one case of Galgotu found in Debari in Govala Futia village. Cattle owner prefer modern treatment practice. Tick is prevalent in all units but it is more prominent in Zawar unit. In each unit cattle owner went to one of the training program like FTP (Farmer Training Program), Anand Dairy (Gujarat) and Karnal (Haryana) organized by HZL. Only in Agucha unit cattle owner went to Karnal training also. 47

Fodder is provided to each beneficiary at proper time. Green fodder is also distributed at scheduled time. In Chanderiya unit, we found in our study that number of buffaloes increased from 15 to 81 from October 2009 to May 2011 in Billiya village near CLZS. Out of 81 buffaloes 20 are female calf.

The camps are being taken place in regular basis and vaccination, de-worming is being done along with distribution of medicines. Insurance is done to female calves when they become 4 month old. In RAM, doctor claims 100% vaccination and zero mortality in all CSR operational villages and they also started Free Artificial Insemination in 22 Panchayat with Govt. through 14 hospitals and sub center along with vaccination.

The participation of youth is the strength of the area. No animal mortality in two year found in Agucha and Dariba. The availability of market is the opportunity available. The prices of milk and livestock in the market has been decided by the middleman is the threat.

48

CHAPTER 6 SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS


6.1 SUGGESTIONS Awareness Program Gender ratio of the area was good. Women were working in different activities of livelihood. Male population was working in agriculture and wage labor. Therefore women were engaged as second livelihood activities and currently they were raring the livestock. And thus women should come forward for livestock development and management activities. Literacy level was very good in that area and this would help to make people aware about the livestock development and management. Therefore facilitation of the awareness programme would be easier and healthy. Young populations were good and that would help in the training programme. Youth could start livestock based livelihood activities according to their convenience. Markets were available locally so the people should be aware about the demand of the market so that they can be motivated for livestock development and management. Service Accessibility Veterinary services should be accessible easily and training camps about health management of livestock would make them aware about health of livestock. This would result in livelihood activities based on livestock. The veterinary services should be made more easily accessible as it would help to reduce the loss of animals due to seasonal diseases. This will help in increasing the number of animals in household and reducing subsequent losses due to serious diseases.

Market availability The culture and tradition allow people to have livestock in their houses. But they are not able to use it more for livelihood purpose. There is good market available but veterinary services were poor. People were aware about management of the livestock and some of 49

them are using livestock as livelihood option. Some people are also using livestock for economic purpose for the emergency period. Now, there is need of livestock development as there was very good potential and environment available for livestock. This will help people to their sustainable livelihood. People were ready to start livestock development but there was scarcity of fund. There should be need of development of credit system or facility to access extension services form government. The market was available but that needed to be linked to the villagers. This will motivate the people to rear the animals with utmost care as it was going to provide revenue to them. The linking to the credit institutions should also be done. Example - Dairy. Villagers Contribution Livestock is an essential asset to the rural poor, both to those directly engaged in agricultural production and to poor non-farm rural households who rely on local production for affordable nutrition. Animal production confers many economic advantages on small farm operations, and in an era of rising urban incomes and improving market access animal products have increasing potential as marketable commodities. If small farmers can more effectively participate in food market growth can contribute significantly to livelihoods of the poor rural majority. There were chances of equal participation of women. The male were predominantly engaged in wage labor. The spare time was for agricultural practices. The women helped in agricultural activities as well as take care of the livestock than men and thus in case if any training about how to go about the caring and keeping of livestocks was being imparted to them this would help the household to have better living conditions. The findings from our research are that livestock development in periphery villages of Hindustan Zinc Limited in all the units can be sustainable livelihood option for peoples. However, strategies are needed to engage poor households and minimize potential negative impacts of larger scale livestock based livelihood activities. Livestock research and development can be effective if attention is paid to meeting the needs of poor villagers and minimizing their risks to fodder security. Forming partnership with agencies and government can facilitate the flow of useful technologies in the area. Meeting growing domestic livestock based products demand is possible if more villagers adopt livestock based livelihood activity. 50

Livestock intensification will be a revolution for some people and motivating factor for other people.

6.2 RECOMMENDATIONS Training More skill oriented training could be organised for villagers so that they can take proper care of the livestock and reduce the death toll due to seasonal diseases among the livestock. Training could also be imparted on vermicompost and proper management with maximum utilisation of its resources. Special programmes should be developed to promote economic management of small ruminants by providing critical inputs and services through their Self Help Groups and assisting in forward and backward linkages.

Health Care Veterinarians should be encouraged to practice in close association with the villagers, to take proper care of the livestock and go for routine checkups. In the past there have been instances where due to lack of proper treatment by the veterinarians there has been death of the cattle and so the people feel that if the cattle die even after the treatment then what the use of availing treatment is? They feel that there is no use in investing for treatment on their livestock. Their accessibility to avail benefits from the block level should be made easier and simpler (as it was found that people avail minimal benefits from the Block). When we enquired the Block office, the Veterinarian officer said that people did not come to the block office/sub-centre at all. So there should be a connecting link to be established. Strategy for Feed Management The animals mostly had open grazing system, and fewer households bought fodder from outside regularly. Fodder was bought only when there was acute shortage that too during the month of January to May so efforts should be made to develop pasture lands involving local communities through soil and water conservation, introduction of

51

improved legumes and grasses, forage tree species and prevention of grazing (to avoid overgrazing). Improvement of Nutritional Values: There is hardly nutritional content present in the fodder animals ate or when they grazed. Grasses are predominant only during the rainy season; rest of the time had dry leaves and dry matter. The major quantity of dry matter is contributed from paddy straws, wheat bhusa and trash, which are of poor nutritional value and with high fibre content. This will also help in augmenting the fodder shortage. Complete Feed Rations: To overcome nutritional imbalance in the field and to facilitate small farmers and landless to maintain their livestock under balanced feeding, decentralised complete feed production units can be established.

Fodder Banks: Establishment of fodder banks in fodder scarcity regions through Dairy Federations. Organisations can help small farmers to feed their livestock during scarcity. In paddy and wheat growing areas where the straw is wasted, facilities for compacting straw should be installed and arrangement should be made to collect and pack them. Fodder banks can play a critical role in timely supply of feed to livestock owners during the drought years. However in the absence of any buyers in good seasons, the stock remains unsold, causing heavy burden for the establishment. Hence, the experiences in the past have not been very encouraging. Therefore linking of complete feed production unit with fodder bank can be explored on a pilot scale.

Support for Small Farmers: For calf rearing, feed subsidy, insurance coverage, etc. which is being given to ensure their active role in helping to promote livestock as second livelihood option can be done in the best possible manner. . 52

Focus on Critical Areas: Some of the critical issues hampering the growth of the livestock sector are nonavailability of feed and fodder, healthcare and market outlets, timely technical guidance and information on disease outbreaks, price and supply of inputs and outputs and finance for investment. These problems can be solved through Public-Private Partnership (PPP). Hence the government should facilitate such schemes immediately. Voluntary agencies can play a significant role in the success of PPP, as they can motivate the farmers to take active part.

Card System: For the records of A.I., fodder distribution, medicines, vaccination, de-worming and insurance two cards should be made. One copy of card will be kept in HZL records and another card will be given to the beneficiaries.

Documentary Film: Different activities which are being done by HZL or must be needed for the betterment of Livestock Management can be shown through this documentary film. This include healthcare, sanitation, AI process, Pregnancy diagnosis test, delivery process, use of dung and how to use the limited sources in the best possible manner.

Pictorial Presentation: Discussion with farmers can be more effective during meeting if the pictorial presentation will be done for all activities which are being implemented in their village. This may include procedure, advantages, disadvantages, solutions of different activities.

Hoarding and wall painting: Hoarding and wall painting are the most important things which need to be implemented. Most of the people are illiterate and unable to read leaflets or parcha so by seeing a picture they will be able to understand.

53

CONCLUSION
In rural India where over 15-20% families are landless and about 80% of the land holders belong to the category of small and marginal farmers for whom, livestock is the main source of livelihood. In the absence of fertile lands and assured irrigation (which are controlled by a small population of rich farmers), lack of employment in the industrial and service sectors, most of the rural families belonging to socio-economically weaker sections of the society maintain different species of livestock to supplement their income. While the land owners prefer cattle and buffaloes, the landless prefer to own sheep and goat and if suitable market to them is provided then it could add to their standard of living. The findings from this research are that livestock development in periphery villages of Hindustan Zinc Limited in all the units can be sustainable livelihood options for the people. However, strategies are needed to engage poor households and minimize potential negative impacts of larger scale livestock based livelihood activities. Livestock research and development can be effective if attention is paid to meeting the needs of poor villagers and minimizing their risks to fodder security. Forming partnership with agencies and government can facilitate the flow of useful technologies in the area. Meeting growing domestic livestock based products demand is possible if more villagers adopt livestock based livelihood activity. Livestock intensification will be a revolution for some people and motivating factor for other people.

54

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Central Statistical Organization (CSO). (2003). India 2010, A Reference Annual Livestock Census

Christoplos, I. and Farrington, J. (2004) Poverty, Vulnerability and Agricultural Extension. Policy Reforms in a Globalizing World. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Delgado, C., Rosegrant, M., Steinfi eld, H., Ehui, S. and Courbois, C. (1999) Livestock to 2020. The Next Food Revolution. Food, Agriculture and the Environment Discussion Paper 28. Washington: International Food Policy Research Institute.

Dolberg, F. (2001) A livestock development approach that contributes to poverty alleviation and widespread improvement of nutrition among the poor in Livestock Research for Rural Development 13 (5). On WWW at http://www.cipav.org.co/lrrd/lrrd13/5.

Economic Survey, India, 2002-03, p.163. http://indiabudget.nic.in/es2002-03/esmain.htm

Livestock in Development (LiD) (1999) Livestock in Poverty-Focused Development. Crewkerne: Livestock in Development. LiD, 1999; Scoones & Wolmer, 2006, IDS Research, Dairy development and Income distribution in India. New Delhi: Institute of Development Studies Research.

Perumal M., Mohan P.S., Suresh M., 2007; Dairy development and Income distribution in India. Abhijeet Publication.

Vedenta: An Overview. http://www.hzlindia.com/about_us.aspx. I

ANNEXTURE I VILLAGE NAYA DARIBA MAHENDURIYA MATA JI KHERA PANCHAYAT KOTRI MAHENDURIYA KOTRI BLOCK RAILMANGRA RAILMANGRA RAILMANGRA RAILMANGRA RAILMANGRA RAILMANGRA RAILMANGRA GIRWA DISTRICT RAJSAMAND RAJSAMAND RAJSAMAND RAJSAMAND RAJSAMAND RAJSAMAND RAJSAMAND UDAIPUR UDAIPUR UDAIPUR UDAIPUR UDAIPUR UDAIPUR UDAIPUR UDAIPUR UDAIPUR UDAIPUR BHILWARA

SINDESAR KHURD RAJPURA SUNERIA KHERA RAJPURA MAKKANPURIA BICCHARI GODWA CHHODA GODA GOVALA FUTIA RAWA KANPUR NEWATALAI SINGATWADA KRISHANPURA ODA RAMPURA KABRA RAJPURA KABRA BICCHARI

BHALLOKA GODA GIRWA BHALLOKA GODA GIRWA BHAISRA KHURD ZAWAR ZAWAR NEWATALAI SINGATWADA SINGATWADA SARADA AGUCHA GIRWA GIRWA GIRWA SARADA SARADA SARADA SINGATWADA HURDA

II

KHEDA PALOLA SULTANPPURA KHATI KHEDA GANESHPURA BILLIYA MUNG KA KHERA

KHOTIA BARDLA HURDA RASHMOR NAGRI PUTOLI

HURDA HURDA HURDA CHITTORGARH CHITTORGARH GANGAR

BHILWARA BHILWARA BHILWARA CHITTORGARH CHITTORGARH CHITTORGARH

III

ANNEXTURE II Interview Schedule Study on Livestock S.no. . Date: ... 1. Name of the Respondent: 2. Name of the village: 3. Name of Hamlet: 4. Panchayat: 5. Block and District: 6. Age: 7. Sex: 8. Marital status: 9. Religion: 10. Caste: 11. Occupation: 12. Nature of the work: 13. Details of family members : I S. No II Name III IV V VI VII VIII IX X Annual Income

Age Sex Relation Marital Education Whethe Occupation Status r involve d in livestoc k or not

IV

IX:

IV: VI: VII:

M = Male, F = Female M = Married, U = Unmarried 1 = Illiterate

VIII:Y/N

S = Service UE= Unemployed AG= Agriculture WL= Wage labor

2 = Primary (up to 5) 3 = Middle 4 = Matriculation 5 = Intermediate 6 = Graduate 2A=Aaganbadi

AT O

= Artisan = Others

14. Livestock Assets : V

Livestock details

Nos.

Type Local Hybrid

Remarks

Cow Bullock Goat Sheep Buffalo Others

16. Livestock Product: Sl. No . Cow Buffalo Cow Buff alo 1 Goa t Shee p Remark Milk (liter/day) Unit added / year

17. Shed arrangements for the livestock:

VI

Type of animal

Type of Shed

Feed Drai Stall nage

Waste mgmt (manure)

Water Electricit Provided protection against Suppl y y Mosquitoe Flie Snakes Wild s s animal

Remark s

Cow Bullock Goat Sheep Buffalo Others

18. Livestock Management: Type of animal Own fodder Controll ed grazing Open grazing Stall feeding Herding System Medicine/ Vaccination

Seaso Year Seas Year Seaso Year Seaso Year Commu Family nal round onal round nal round nal round nity herder Cow Bullock herder

VII

Goat Sheep Buffalo Others

19. Availability of feed and fodder: Sl. No. Is there any shortage of fodder (Yes/No) Cow Bullock Goat Sheep Buffalo Others 20. Investment on Livestock: Type of Livestock Feed Shed Health Labor Tota l Net Return Remarks Shortage period of fodder Coping mechanism Storage facility Coping for the fodder(Yes/No) mechanism Remark

VIII

Medicine Vaccin ation Cow Bullock Goat Sheep Buffalo Others 21. Use of Livestock:

Insuranc e

Type of Livestock

Nos. Milk

Use of Livestock Meat Other

Manures

Cow Bullock Goat Sheep Buffalo Others

22. Livestock Economy

IX

A. Income from milk and meat (Livestock): Anim al Sourc e Milk (Yesterdays produce)? (Manure) Meat (Monthly) (Manure) Tota l Valu e (Rs.) Yiel Own d (L) Consu mption (L) Sellin Unit g (L) Price (Rs./ L) Mark et/Pla ce Yiel d (KG or Nos. ) Own Consu mption (kg or Nos.) Sellin Unit g (kg or Nos.) Price (Rs/kg or Rs/anima l) Mark et/Pla ce

B. Income from calf/baby Yes / No Type of animal Cow Bullock Goat Sheep Calf/Baby Retained Calf/Baby Sold Unit price of sale / Retained Yearly Earnings Remarks

Buffalo Others

23. Marketing System of Livestock

A. Regional marketing of livestock (Purchases): Type of Livesto ck Middl Loca Nearby Largest e man l Hart Market Market mode of Marketing Place of Mark et Distanc e from the Village Middl Loca Nearb e man l Hat y Marke t Larges t Marke t Variation of Price (Rs.) Re mar ks

Cow Bullock Goat Sheep Buffalo Others

B. Regional marketing of livestock (Sales):

XI

Type of mode of Marketing Livesto ck Middl e man Loca l Hart Nearb y Marke t Largest Market

Place of Marke t

Distanc e from the Village ( in km.) Mid dle man

Difference of Price ( Rs.) Local Hat Nearb Larges y t

Mark Market et

Cow Bulloc k Goat Sheep Buffal o Others

24. Livestock Health: A. What are the major health problems/Diseases among the livestock? Livestock Cow Bullock Diseases/Infection Remark

XII

Goat Sheep Buffalo Others

B. Common Diseases (season wise): Season Summer Monsoon Winter Type of diseases Remarks

25. Treatment Practice: Type Panchayat Level Veterinary Hospital Block Level Veterinary Hospital Private Veterinary Doctor Quack Traditional method Others Yes/No Remarks

26. Availability of Veterinary Services:

XIII

Availability Veterinary Center Veterinary Inspector Junior Veterinary Officer Para Veterinary Officer Vaccination of Animal Information for vaccinating animals Camp for livestock Traditional Breeding Techniques Modern Breeding Techniques (A.I.)

Yes/No

Remarks (Specified)

27. Vaccination: Type of Diseases (specify) New Castle Foot and Mouth (Fatua) Loose Motion (Jhara), Goat/ Sheep Loose Motion (Cow, Buffalo) Treatment (Mode of Vaccinating) Modern Traditional Remarks

28. Capacity Building Training on Livestock Management: XIV

Did you undergo any training programme? Yes / No S.N Nature of training (Veterinary/for breeding/traditional etc.) Name of the Institute from which the training imparted Duratio n of the training Learning Outcome / Training Imparted (Yes/No) Remarks

29. Do you require more training? Yes / No If yes, specify the area to be trained? ______________________________________

30. What are the other various institutes in your reach?

31. Do you have awareness regarding the immunization of livestock? Yes/no

32. Do you regularly immunize them?

Yes/No

If Yes, Specify (Traditional /Modern) .. Type of Immunization

XV

33. Any Govt. scheme being operated (Now /before)

Yes/No

If Yes (how useful) specify

34. Provision of credit facilities for the livestock: Financial Help Yes/No Amount ( Rs.) SHG Local Moneylenders Bank Relatives Remarks

35. Problem of Livestock Management? Sl. No. 1. 2. 3. Non availability of fodder Scarcity of Fund Lack of Knowledge about health and care of Livestock 4. Poor accessibility of extension Problem Yes/No Category of problem* Ways/ Means for Solution

XVI

Service 5. Lack of Knowledge about Commercial livestock Management 6. Others

36. Problems faced during marketing of Livestock: SN Problems faced 1. Price 2. Knowledge about Market of Livestock 3. Distance of the market 4. Transportation 5. Middlemen *(1-7) Major problem will be ranked as 1 & so on (Ranking)* Remarks

37. Is loan easily available from bank

Yes / No

What do you want from their side to be done

(please specify)

XVII

38. Whether you are availing the insurance facilities? Any Agency Involved If yes,

Yes/No Yes/No

specify.. .. Any benefit received (Please specify). What are the Problems (if any) encountered 39.Village-level Institutions : Name of the Institution VDI SHG BIAF Others Legal Status Present Status Main Activities (Yes/No)

Sl. No.

Type of Institution

1 2 3 4.

XVIII

Remarks:

Date: -

/2011

Name of Interviewer: -

Signature

Accompanying Person: -

Signature with Date

Code:

XIX

ANNEXTURE III Questionnaire Stakeholders A. Profile Information

Name of respondent District Name (tick) Block Name Village Name a. State (Tick only one option) b. Age b. working area d. Highest qualification Illiterate Below SSC/HSC SSC Some college/ not graduate Grad/PG (general) Grad/PG (professional) < 25 26 40 41 55 > 55 1 4 2 5 3 6

e. working post f. working experience

XX

B. Breeding pattern

1. Which breeding are done (tick the specific ones) and indicate months by 1 if it is done in specific month or leave it blank. Breeding (Tick breeding) Murrah Gir H.F. Jersy Desi Others Jan Feb Mar April May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

C. VILLAGERS MEETING

2. How many cattle owners/ farmers meeting you have attended in last season/one year? (Please tick only one option)

1 3

0-3 8-10

2 4

4-7 11 and more

XXI

3. How many cattle owners/ farmers meeting you have attended focused on AI & Green fodder? (Please tick only one option)

1 3

0-2 6-8

2 4

3-5 9 and more

4. Which company(s) cattle owners/ farmers meeting you have attended in last one year? (Please tick only one option for each company)

S. No. 1. 2.

Companies

Attended

Not attended

HZL (BAIF) Others

5. What kind of information is available in cattle owners/ farmers meeting about the AI & Green fodder? (Please tick only one option for each kind of information)

S. No. 1 2 3 4

Information

Yes

No

XXII

5 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

6. Rate the likeability of Cattle owners/ farmers meet organized by BAIF/HZL? (Please tick only one option)

Very High 5

High 4

Fair 3

Poor 2

Very Poor 1

7. Did information from Cattle owners/ farmers meeting about BAIF/HZL help you in purchase decision? (Please tick only one option)

Yes

No

8. Rate the credibility of the information about AI and Green fodder collected/gained at cattle owners/ farmers meet? (Please tick only one option)

Very High 5

High 4

Fair 3

Poor 2

Very Poor 1

XXIII

9. What measures company needs to take to improve effectiveness of cattle owners/ farmers meet?

D. HOARDING/WALL PAINTING

10. Did you ever noticed hoarding on your visit to village (specify town name)? (Please tick only one option)

1.

Yes

2.

No

11. Which of the AI & Green Fodder brand hoarding you have seen on your way to village (specify name)? (Please tick only one option for each company)

S. No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Companies

Yes

No

XXIV

6.

12. Rate the likeability of hoarding/wall paintings placed by BAIF/HZL? (Please tick only one option)

Very High 5

High 4

Fair 3

Poor 2

Very Poor 1

13. Rate the credibility of information about AI & Green fodder in the wall paintings/hoardings? (Please tick only one option)

Very High 5

High 4

Fair 3

Poor 2

Very Poor 1

14. Which of colors are used by BAIF brand in their wall painting? (Please tick only one option for each color)

S. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Green Red Yellow Brown Blue White Black Pink Orange

Colors

Yes

No

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

XXV

E. CAMPAIGN

15. Which of the following company carried campaign in your area? (Please tick only one option for each company)

S. No. 1. 2.

Companies

Yes

No

16. Have you attended campaign of HZL (BAIF)? (Please tick only one option)

1.

Yes

2.

No

17. Which of the following types of information is provided from the Campaign? (Please tick only one option for each information area) S. No. 1 2 3 4. 5. 5 6 Information Area Yes No

XXVI

18. Have they distributed literature and leaflets informing about Livestocks?

Yes

No

19. Have you found leaflet or literature provided during Campaign helpful?

Yes

No

20. Rate the likeability of Campaign carried by HZL (BAIF)?

Very High 5

High 4

Fair 3

Poor 2

Very Poor 1

21. Did information from Campaign about HZL (BAIF) help you in purchase decision?

Yes

No

22. Rate the credibility of the information about AI & Green fodder provided by Campaign?

Very High 5

High 4

Fair 3

Poor 2

Very Poor 1

F. FILM SHOW 23. Have u attended the film show organized by the HZL (BAIF)? (Please tick only one option)

Yes

No

XXVII

24. Which of the information was imparted through film? (Please tick only one option for each kind of information)

S. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6

Information Company Production process Complex AI and fodder Benefits of complex AI How to use? When to use?

Yes

No

25. Whom Zamindar consult to know about right fertilizer to get maximum production of green fodder from his field? (Please tick only one option)

1.

Agriculture officer

2.

Fellow Farmer

Retailer

26. Rate the likeability of Campaign carried by HZL (BAIF)? (Please tick only one option)

Very High 5

High 4

Fair 3

Poor 2

Very Poor 1

27. Did information from Campaign about Livestock help you in purchase decision? (Please tick only one option)

Yes

No

28. Rate the credibility of the information about Livestock provided by Campaign? (Please tick only one option)

Very High

High

Fair

Poor

Very Poor

XXVIII

29. Village-level Institutions : Sl. No. 1 Name of the Institution Type of Institution Govt. Legal Status Present Status Main Activities Community help 2 SHG PRIs Govt./others Regt. Working Savings

Aaganbadi

Registered Not Working

30. Investment on livestock:

Health

Labor

Total

Net Return

Remarks

Medicine

Vaccinatio n

Insurance

XXIX

31. Livestock Health: A. What are the major health problems/Diseases among the livestock? Livestock Cow Bullock Goat Buffalo Others Diseases/Infection Remark

B. Common Diseases (season wise): Season Summer Monsoon Winter Type of diseases Remarks

32. Treatment Practice: Type Panchayat Level Veterinary Hospital Block Level Veterinary Hospital XXX Yes/No Remarks

Private Veterinary Doctor Quack Traditional method /Others HZL (BAIF)

33. Availability of Veterinary Services: Availability Veterinary Center Veterinary Inspector Junior Veterinary Officer Para Veterinary Officer Vaccination of Animal Information for vaccinating animals Camp for livestock Traditional Breeding Techniques Modern Breeding Techniques Yes/No Remarks (Specified)

34. Vaccination: Type of Diseases (specify) Treatment (Mode of Vaccinating) Modern New Castle Foot and Mouth (Fatua) Traditional Remarks

XXXI

B.Q. ETV (Goat) H.S. Others

35. Capacity Building Training on Livestock Management: Did you undergo any training programme? Yes / No S. Nature of training N (Veterinary/for breeding/traditional etc.) Name of the Institute from which the training imparted Duratio n of the training Learning / Training Imparted (Yes/No) Outcome Remarks

36. Do you require more training? Yes / No If yes, specify the area to be trained? ______________________________________

37. Provision of credit facilities for the livestock: Financial Help SHG Local Moneylenders Yes/No Amount ( Rs.) Remarks

XXXII

Bank Relatives

38. Problem of Livestock Management? Sl. No. 7. 8. 9. Non availability of fodder Scarcity of Fund Lack of Knowledge about health and care of Livestock 10. 11. Poor accessibility of extension Service Lack of Knowledge about Commercial livestock Management 12. Others Yes/No Yes/No (Please specify) Problem Yes/No Category of problem* Ways/ Means for Solution

39. Whether you are availing the insurance facilities? Any Agency Involved Any benefit received What are the Problems (if any) encountered

Remarks: XXXIII

Date: -

/2011

Name of Interviewer: -

Signature

Accompanying Person: -

Signature with Date

MOU

ANNEXURE IV

XXXIV

XXXV

XXXVI

XXXVII

XXXVIII

XXXIX

XL

XLI