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Thursday July 12, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 283
HEALTH CARE LAW
NATION PAGE 7
DISTRICT 52
TITLES WON
SPORTS PAGE 11
FUTURE OPTIONS OF
AMERICAN AIRLINES
NATION PAGE 8
REPUBLICANS PUSH BILL THROUGH HOUSE TO REPEAL
OBAMACARE
Turning 65 soon? Understand your options?
I CAN HELP!
John Bowman
(650) 525-9180
john@baywoodinsurance.com
CA License# 0E08395
1700 S. El Camino Real Suite 355l, San Mateo
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The countys mosquito abatement dis-
trict, facing possible dissolution in the
wake of a half-million dollar embezzle-
ment scandal, argues elimination is unwar-
ranted because the agency has already fixed
its problems, would be a low priority if
absorbed into the countys Environmental
Health division and is not the only public
entity marked by employee wrongdoing.
The San Mateo County Mosquito and
Vector Control District has learned a difcult
lesson and is devoted to its new system of
financial management, attorney Joan
Cassman wrote on behalf of the district in a
July 9 letter to the Local Agency Formation
Commission.
LAFCo is a state-mandated, independent
agency that oversees the organization and
boundaries of the countys cities and special
districts. Next week, the board will decide
whether to act on a recommendation by
Executive Director Martha Poyatos to dis-
solve the district and its 21-member board
made up of appointees by the countys city
councils and open the door to takeover by San
Mateo County.
However, Cassman said LAFCo has no
credible basis for reaching the conclusion and
gives short shrift to the districts efforts to
right itself after the alleged embezzlement of
$450,000 by the former nance director and
accounting supervisor.
LAFCo heartily endorsed the district during
its 2003 review so district ofcials are now
asking why, if adequate nancial reforms
have been put in place, the commission does
not support keeping the status quo.
Poyatos said at that time there was an immi-
nent public health threat because of West Nile
Mosquito district fights for life
Agency officials lobbying for support, decision on its future next week
Civil grand jury examining
county, community schools
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Serving high school students detained for legal issues or
who have been expelled could be improved by consolidating
three locations and creating performance measures, according
to a San Mateo County Civil Grand Jury report released
Wednesday.
In the seven-page report, the civil grand jury explored the
question: How does San Mateo County provide educational
services for high school-aged juveniles that have been detained
Colleges sharpen
focus on students
seeking degrees
Lifelong learners to take lower
priority because of budget cuts
Officials agree with idea of consolidating
campuses and exploring accreditation
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A statewide effort to designate enrollment priorities for
community college students could have local impacts but
mostly in terms of how those services are funded.
Earlier this week, the California Community College Board
of Governors met to discuss enrollment priority regulations,
which will go up for a nal vote in September. If approved,
community colleges would have until the fall of 2014 to cre-
ate a system of rewarding students progressing toward trans-
ferring or earning a certicate or a degree rather than students
who take classes without that goal.
The proposed changes encourage successful student
behaviors and ensure the system is intelligently rationing
classes at a time of scarce resources to provide more students
with the opportunity to achieve their goals on time,
Chancellor Jack Scott wrote in a prepared statement. Current
See DEGREES, Page 18
See SCHOOLS, Page 20
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Plans to upgrade Burton Park
including bocce ball courts, an outdoor
stage and renovated basketball court
comes with a hefty price tag which is
why a San Carlos foundation is offering
people a variety of ways to help raise the
funds.
Phase II of the plan to upgrade San
Carlos oldest developed park comes
with a $1.15 million cost. Once complet-
ed, the city will have a permanent stage,
nicer basketball courts and join the
growing number of local cities with
bocce ball courts. The San Carlos Parks
and Recreation Foundation is hoping to
raise $250,000 toward the plan. People
can help by purchasing naming rights to
a part of the park or attending the second
annual Symphony at Sunset Fundraiser
July 27.
San Carlos citizens have long identi-
ed the citys parks and recreation facil-
ities as essential to their quality of life,
said foundation board member Debbie
Denton.
Efforts to raise funds for the second
phase started about two years ago. The
group has hosted a golf tournament and
found success with its Good Life
Calendar project, said Denton. Now its
rolling out opportunities for people to
name some of the new additions to the
park like having a plaque on the new
stage, near a tree or even the bocce ball
courts. Thus far, a sponsor has come for-
ward to name the dancing area in front
of the stage, she said.
In November 2010, the San Carlos
City Council signed off on the conceptu-
al design for Phase II and directed its
staff to work with the foundation to
develop fundraising strategies to secure
money for the project.
The stage is proposed to include a cov-
ering and a space in front covered by
pavers or concrete to accommodate
Raising green for green space
San Carlos foundation strategizing how to fund Burton Park improvements
ROSIE LINARES/DAILY JOURNAL
Children play on the swings at Burton Park in San Carlos.The city plans to upgrade the park to have a permanent stage,nicer
basketball courts and bocce ball courts.
See PARK, Page 18
See LAFCO, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1862
President Abraham Lincoln signed a
bill passed by Congress authorizing the
Medal of Honor.
If opportunity doesnt knock, build a door.
Milton Berle, American
comedian (born this date in 1908, died 2002).
Comedian Bill
Cosby is 75.
Actor Topher
Grace is 34.
In other news ...
Birthdays
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the 60s. West winds
5 to 10 mph increasing to 10 to 20 mph in
the afternoon.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 10 to 20 mph...Becoming 5 to 10 mph
after midnight.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 60s. West
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower
50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 06 Whirl
Win in rst place; No.05 California Classic in sec-
ond place; and No.08 Gorgeous George in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:44.41.
(Answers tomorrow)
CABIN OMEGA ATTEND STRAND
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After the guitarist donated his kidney, he
became this AN ORGANIST
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SOGOE
CIXTO
TUNTAR
SCAWEH
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
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b
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k

h
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p
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A:
1 4 8
3 11 19 23 36 21
Mega number
July 10 Mega Millions
4 7 16 17 19
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 3 3 6
Daily Four
4 6 0
Daily three evening
In 1543, Englands King Henry VIII married his sixth and last
wife, Catherine Parr.
In 1690, forces led by William of Orange defeated the army of
James II at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland.
In 1812, U.S. forces led by Gen. William Hull invaded Canada
during the War of 1812 against Britain. (However, Hull retreat-
ed shortly thereafter to Detroit.)
In 1909, the House of Representatives joined the Senate in
passing the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, allowing
for a federal income tax, and submitted it to the states. (It was
declared ratied in February 1913.)
In 1912, the silent lm Queen Elizabeth, starring Sarah
Bernhardt, opened in New York.
In 1948, the Democratic national convention, which nominat-
ed President Harry S. Truman for a second term of ofce,
opened in Philadelphia.
In 1962, The Rolling Stones played their rst-ever gig at The
Marquee in London.
In 1977, President Jimmy Carter defended Supreme Court lim-
its on government payments for poor womens abortions, say-
ing, There are many things in life that are not fair.
In 1984, Democratic presidential candidate Walter F. Mondale
announced hed chosen U.S. Rep. Geraldine A. Ferraro of New
York to be his running-mate; Ferraro was the rst woman to
run for vice president on a major-party ticket.
In 1988, Democratic presidential candidate Michael S.
Dukakis tapped Senator Lloyd Bentsen of Texas as his run-
ning-mate.
In 1991, a Japanese professor (Hitoshi Igarashi) who had
translated Salman Rushdies The Satanic Verses was found
stabbed to death, nine days after the novels Italian translator
was attacked in Milan.
Raccoons chase, attack
Washington state woman
LAKEWOOD, Wash. A
Washington state woman says she was
attacked and bitten by raccoons after her
dog chased several of the animals up a
tree.
Michaela Lee had just nished jogging
in Lakewoods Fort Steilacoom Park on
Monday when her dog got loose. When
she went to grab the dogs leash, several
other raccoons started to scratch her legs,
chased her for about 75 feet, knocked her
down and bit her.
Neighbor Michael Parks tells The
News Tribune he heard Lee screaming
and saw her on the ground. He called 911.
Two other neighbors also went to help.
Lee says her American dingo dog began
barking and helped drive the raccoons
off.
The 28-year-old Lee was treated for
about 16 puncture wounds and had
numerous scratches.
Yoga teacher fired after
glare at Facebook worker
SAN FRANCISCO Looks may not
kill, but they could get you red.
Thats what a Northern California yoga
instructor who wanted an hour of undis-
tracted peace while leading sessions at
Facebooks Menlo Park campus said hap-
pened to her. No distractions meant no
cellphones.
But the instructor, Alice Van Ness, said
her rule backred, and she got red after
she glared at a Facebook employee who
texted during a class in June.
The whole point for most people
going to yoga is that its disconnecting
from the outside world, said Van Ness, a
35-year-old San Carlos resident who has
taught yoga for six years. If you are
bringing your phone into class, why are
you even there?
Van Ness told the Facebook class to
turn their phones off after seeing a female
employee with a cellphone out. Later,
while demonstrating a difcult pose, she
caught the same worker typing on her
phone. Van Ness said she stayed silent,
but shot the woman a disapproving look.
The employee stepped out before return-
ing to the class, Van Ness said.
According to a termination letter from
Plus One Health Management that was
provided to the Associated Press by Van
Ness, she was warned prior to the class
that she could not enforce a cellphone
ban. David Milani, a representative of
Plus One Health Management, declined
to comment specically on Van Ness
case. But he said company instructors
who teach at some companies including
Facebook are required to allow tness
members to pick up their phones during
class.
Van Ness thought it would blow over,
until her employer red her two weeks
later. The Facebook employee was
embarrassed and shocked by the con-
frontation with the instructor, the termi-
nation letter indicated. The company
feared making clients unhappy, Van Ness
said.
We are in the business of providing
great customer service. Unless a client
requires us to specically say `no to
something, we prefer to say `yes when-
ever possible, an ofcial wrote in the ter-
mination letter.
Facebook, in a statement, declined to
comment on Van Ness case, saying its
against their policy to comment on deci-
sions made by outside vendors.
Boared piggy
goes to bank in Austria
VIENNA Piggy bank has a new
meaning in a town east of Vienna after a
surveillance camera caught a wild pig on
a night foray to a local branch of one of
Austrias nancial institutions.
The Austria Press Agency reports that
the inquisitive porker managed to push
open a locked sliding glass door of a bank
in Hainburg an der Donau to make its
way inside. After looking around, it left
the same way it came without causing
signicant damage, with the door locking
behind it.
APA, in its report Wednesday, said
bank ofcials became suspicious last
month after a member of the early morn-
ing cleaning staff noticed large smear
marks on the door. A review of surveil-
lance footage identied the unusual visi-
tor.
12 21 39 40 43 26
Mega number
July 11 Super Lotto Plus
REUTERS
Young male gymnasts (bottom) stretch their legs as a female gymnast jumps on a stage at a local juvenile sports school in
Jiaxing, Zhejiang province, China.
Olympic gure
skater Kristi
Yamaguchi is 41
Movie director Monte Hellman is 83. Pianist Van Cliburn is 78.
Singer-musician Christine McVie is 69. Actress Denise Nicholas
is 68. Singer-songwriter Butch Hancock is 67. Fitness guru
Richard Simmons is 64. Actor Jay Thomas is 64. Singer Walter
Egan is 64. Writer-producer Brian Grazer is 61. Actress Cheryl
Ladd is 61. Country singer Julie Miller is 56. Gospel singer Sandi
Patty is 56. Actress Mel Harris is 56. Actor Buddy Foster is 55.
Rock guitarist Dan Murphy (Soul Asylum) is 50. Actress Judi
Evans is 48. Rock singer Robin Wilson (Gin Blossoms) is 47.
Actress Lisa Nicole Carson is 43. Country singer Shannon
Lawson is 39. Rapper Magoo is 39. Actress Anna Friel is 36.
3
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Many believe that all Mortgage Companies provide the
sameservice, but did you know that the wrong choice can
cost you thousands of dollars in fees and higher
interest rates? Did you know that Mortgage company
commissions are based on how much they can get you to pay?
CONSUMER BEWARE!!!
CHOOSING THE WRONG MORTGAGE COMPANY CAN
BE A VERY COSTLY DISASTER
ALL MORTGAGE COMPANIES ARE NOT CREATED
EQUAL
YOU DESERVE THE BEST, YOU DESERVE THE PROS,
ALL HOME PROS.
ALLHOMEPROS.COM
NEVER SETTLE, ALWAYS LOOK FOR THE SEAL!
VISIT ALLHOMEPRO.COM
OR CALL (650) 726-7700 415-ALL-PROS
SAN MATEO
Stolen vehicle. A green Honda Accord was
stolen at Eighth Avenue and South B Street
before 2:34 p.m. Tuesday, July 10.
Suspicious vehicle. Someone saw the
exchanging of bags from a vehicle on the 200
block of La Casa Avenue before 6:52 p.m.
Monday, July 9.
Fraud. An employee was taken into custody
for fraudulent returns at The Home Depot on
the 2000 block of Chess Drive before 12:44
p.m. Monday, July 9.
Fraud. Credit card fraud was reported on the
100 block of Hillsdale Boulevard before 6:41
p.m. Sunday, July 8.
Vandalism. Gratti was found on a persons
work trailer on the 1800 block of Shoreview
Avenue before 2:13 p.m. Sunday, July 8.
Vandalism. Gratti was found on a building
on the 1000 block of Howard Avenue before
7:58 a.m. Sunday, July 8.
REDWOOD CITY
Reckless driver. Someone in a green Ford
Explorer was on his cellphone and swerving at
Woodside and Middleeld roads before 8:25
p.m. Tuesday, July 10.
Hit and run. Someone reported that her vehi-
cle was hit on Harding Avenue before 6:56
p.m. Tuesday, July 10. A number was left on
the windshield, but the number did not work.
Police reports
Disturbance on the Square
A dark vehicle was being driven around
continuously honking and disturbing
movie goers with its horn at the
Courthouse Square on Broadway in
Redwood City before 9:45 p.m. on
Thursday, July 5.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Coroner Robert Foucrault and the county
once again prevailed in a civil suit claiming he
violated his duty and the law by giving pieces
of a deceased mans brain to a private pathol-
ogist for evaluation in a wrongful death suit
without notifying his devoutly Jewish parents
they were not burying his entire body.
The suit by Jerald and Sandra Wolkoff was
their third attempt to hold Coroner Robert
Foucrault and San Mateo County accountable.
Twice before, a judge did not favor the
Wolkoffs but gave them the chance to le a
new complaint. In a hearing Wednesday,
Judge Joseph Bergeron again gave the couple
the opportunity to amend the lawsuit. If the
Wolkoffs do not contest the tentative ruling it
will become the courts order but attorney
Jayme Burns, who represents the Wolkoffs,
plans to le a new complaint. Burns said she
was not completely surprised at yesterdays
ruling although she felt the complaint was
strong.
The latest suit maintained the duty of care
argument but also added
allegations that Foucraults
treatment of Steven
Wolkoffs brain interfered
with the Wolkoffs right to
dispose of their sons
remains under California
law.
Bergerons ruling found
that the law refers to dis-
posal after scientic use
has concluded and that the
criminal statute cited by the suit relates only
to circumstances after a body has been
interred or is awaiting interment or cremation.
Neither apply to the case.
Bergeron also ruled that the Wolkoffs
werent deprived of property under the statute
used and that laws invoked are not used to
protect against emotional distress.
Steven Wolkoff died June 21, 2008 in a
vehicle crash on Highway 1 that also killed
another 21-year-old man. During the autopsy,
pieces of his neck and brain stem were
retained as part of standard procedure. The
following June, the Wolkoffs sued several par-
ties in their sons death including the county
and American Medical Response whose
workers they said failed to revive him. In
preparing its defense, AMR subpoenaed the
coroner records and tissue slides. The family
learned during a May 2010 deposition that
their sons brain was not buried with his body.
Although state law did not require Foucrault
to inform or seek consent from the Wolkoffs
to retain the tissue slides, they say he violated
his own ofce policy which was established
after another mother sued over the retention of
her deceased sons heart. That suit by Selina
Picon sparked proposed state legislation that
failed to become law but the courts ruled in
the countys favor.
Burns said she isnt certain how many times
the suit will be reled if again denied but the
judge keeps allowing amendments and her
rm continues nding new legal arguments.
We believe in the basis of this suit and our
clients strongly believe in it, she said.
Foucrault was not available for comment.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Coroner prevails in body part suit, again
Robert
Foucrault
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The motorist arrested for evading police
after driving the wrong way through the pres-
idential motorcade during Barack Obamas
Redwood City visit in May pleaded not guilty
and asked for a speedy trial.
Eddie Darrell Boyce Jr., 49, is charged with
a felony count of eeing a peace ofcer and a
misdemeanor charge of hit and run. After
pleading not guilty to both counts, Boyce
declined to waive his right to a speedy trial
and was scheduled for Aug. 27.
Redwood City police arrested the Mountain
View man May 23 after he reportedly drove
his sedan around a barri-
cade near Manzanita
Street and down a street
sealed off for the motor-
cades trip from an
Atherton campaign event
to the Fox Theatre on
Broadway. The president
was not yet in the area.
The ofcers tried cutting
Boyce off but he allegedly
drove the wrong way down El Camino Real
and crashed into a curb and SamTrans sign in
the 2600 block near Carlos Avenue.
After being taken into custody, Boyce
reportedly told police he knew Obama was
going to be at the Fox Theatre but wasnt
attempting to harm him. Boyce also said he
didnt hear the police siren and was on his
way to visit a friend.
If convicted, Boyce faces six years in prison
as a second-striker.
He remains in custody on $500,000 bail.
Presidential motorcade crasher pleads not guilty
Eddie Boyce
4
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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improve patient access to
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measure of our commitment
to our patients, employees
and communities.
$2.4 BILLION
Sutter Healths investment of
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Visit TheSutterStory.org
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5
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San
Francisco/San Mateo has been threatened
before for some of his controversial legisla-
tion and comments while serving in
Sacramento but foes of a new bill Yee is
pushing to close a loophole in state law
related to automatic weapons has drawn out
some of the most racist diatribes the senator
has ever received.
Although the senator and his office are
used to getting threats for his positions on
issues such as violent video games; Sarah
Palins paycheck for a speaking engagement
at a California State University campus; and
calling out Rush Limbaugh for racist com-
ments he made on radio, the new threats have
taken an even uglier turn, said Adam
Keigwin, Yees chief of staff.
Usually you dismiss them but the volume
of racist comments is high. The number of
letters that reference Yees ethnicity is quite
surprising, Keigwin told the Daily Journal
yesterday.
Senate Bill 249 passed out of the
Assembly Public Safety Committee last
week on a 4-2 vote and will be considered
after the Legislature comes back from break
in the Assembly Appropriations Committee.
Although California has some of strongest
gun control laws in the country, gun manu-
facturers are getting around one the states
most important assault weapon laws, accord-
ing to Yees office. The loophole allows own-
ership of a semi-automatic weapon such
as an AR-15 and AK-47 that has a maga-
zine which can be easily detached by a small
magnet.
Magazines, or the storage areas that allow
for repeat firing, that can be removed by a
normal push button in combination with fea-
tures such as a pistol grip and telescoping
stock are banned in California. The law
essentially requires magazines to be fixed, or
removed or replaced with the use of a tool, in
order to slow down the process of reloading.
To get around the law, gun makers have
created a new mechanism, or tool, that
allows the magazine to be easily removed by
just putting a small magnet over the tool
release feature, basically recreating a normal
push button and allowing magazines to be
changed within seconds, according to Yees
office.
The National Rifle Association, California
Rifle & Pistol Association and California
Association of Federal
Firearms Licensees
oppose the bill and have
encouraged their mem-
bers to write Yee and other
lawmakers expressing
their opposition to the leg-
islation.
The California
Association of Federal
Firearms Licensees has
even paid for a billboard on northbound
Highway 101 in San Carlos that reads Sen.
Yee hates your civil rights! Stop SB 249.
The billboard was placed on Highway 101
to inform residents of the area about the
issue and Yees history of authoring uncon-
stitutional laws, said Brandon Combs, who is
on the board of the licensees group.
He pointed to the Supreme Court ruling
that struck down a California law that would
restrict the sale of violent video games as an
example of Yees unconstitutional laws.
The group does not, however, endorse the
use of racist comments to intimidate law-
makers, he said.
We deplore any racist comments and we
stand with Yee in that regard. Its not about
Yee, its about the bill, Combs told the
Daily Journal yesterday.
The groups contend that Yees bill will
make criminals out of law-abiding citizens
but Yee says the loophole in existing law
circumvents the spirit of gun-control laws
already on the books.
There is absolutely no reason why these
military-style weapons need to have such
easily changeable magazines. While most
gun owners are law abiding, I am deeply
concerned with these assault weapons get-
ting into the wrong hands, resulting in mass
casualties of civilians or law enforcement
officers, Yee wrote in a statement.
Opponents of the bill have sent thousands
of letters to Yees office urging him to drop
the effort. Most, about 99 percent, come
from outside his district, Keigwin said.
Some of the most radical comments from
foes of the bill included: Buddy we are out
here and we are going to fight you I see
youre from Communist China and you
arent getting away with this crap Go
back to China.
Others have taken to Twitter, Facebook,
Calguns.net, AR15.com,
AroundTheCapitol.com and other websites
to post offensive comments and photos,
including racist caricatures of Asians and
comments such as Take this sh*t back to
China you communist f*ck, who the f*ck
let a chink into office, and Read the
AMERICAN constitution, you commie
chink f*ck, among others, according to
Yees office.
The offensive comments will not stop Yee
from pushing for the bills passage, Keigwin
said.
The California Rifle & Pistol
Associations concerns regarding SB 249
include the fact that it would make it illegal
to possess parts for magazine releases on
most semi-automatic firearms with detach-
able magazines. There are hundreds of thou-
sands of firearms that may be impacted by
SB 249, the organization contends. These
firearms are legally owned by California res-
idents and Yees bill could potentially make
criminals out of law-abiding citizens, the
organization states on its website.
The California Police Chiefs Association
is not supporting SB 249 and believes the
issue should be addressed administratively
through the California Attorney Generals
Office.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 106.
Yee bill targets assault weapon loophole
Wide range of opposition to the legislation, including some racist correspondence
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A billboard on Highway 101 in San Mateo County opposes Senate Bill 249, a bill that targets
semi-automatic weapons.
Leland Yee
By Paul Larson


MILLBRAE I
recently attended a
family funeral in
Southern California.
The burial took
place at a long
established Catholic
Cemetery which
later decided to build a Mortuary facility on
their property. I knew from past experience
that this cemetery was well maintained and
had a good reputation. The immediate
family had other loved-ones buried at the
cemetery and wished to return this time too.
With the knowledge that this cemetery had a
Mortuary on the grounds they trusted it to be
convenient and decided to have this facility
handle the funeral arrangements.
Prior to the funeral I had some phone
contact with the Mortuary staff and saw
nothing out of the ordinary. But soon after I
spoke to family members who relayed
troubling details such as higher than average
costs, questionable service and other
apprehensions that raised a red-fag. I
listened carefully taking into consideration
that funerals and arrangements may be
conducted differently in Southern California
(as compared to here on the Peninsula).
Later though I discovered that these
concerns and others were all valid as I
experienced them myself during the funeral.
Coming from the background of owning
a family run and community supportive
funeral home I was embarrassed at what I
saw as a production line process with little
compassion or time to care for the families
this Mortuary is supposed to be serving.
I wondered how the Catholic Church
could allow this Mortuary to operate in such
a manner? Well, I did some research and
discovered that the Archdiocese of Los
Angeles has mortuaries located on a
number of their cemetery properties, but
does not operate them. According to the
Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern
California the Archdiocese has an
arrangement with Stewart Enterprises
which is a New Orleans based mortuary
corporation. Stewart Enterprises runs a
website called Catholic Mortuaries.com
giving a misleading impression to many that
the Catholic Church operates these facilities.
When patronizing one of these
mortuaries on Catholic cemetery grounds
most families assume that they will be
receiving a level of comfort as they would
from their local church or parish priest.
None of this was evident during my
experience of extremely high costs
(compared to what was received) and the
dis-interested service provided by the
mortuary staff. I dont see this as a failing
of the Catholic cemetery, but of those in
charge of running this mortuary.
The point Im trying to make is to do
your homework and shop for a Funeral
establishment you are comfortable with.
Just because a Mortuary is located on
cemetery property doesnt mean they are
your only choice or that they offer fair costs
or give better quality ofservice. You have
the right to select what ever funeral home
you wish to conduct the arrangements. Talk
to various funeral directors, and ask friends
and families who they would recommend.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Advertisement
6
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
San Mateo County Office of Education
Career Technical Education
C. Walter (Walt) Birkelo
C. Walter (Walt) Birkelo, born Dec. 17, 1923, died July 7,
2012 at the age of 88 years.
He served as city manager of the city of
South San Francisco from 1977 to August
1987.
Mr. Birkelos career was devoted to pub-
lic service and education, serving in the
following positions; budget/personnel of-
cer of Fargo, N.D., assistant city manager
of Daytona Beach, Fla., senior administra-
tive analyst of San Diego and city manager
of Davis and Eureka. He also was on pub-
lic administration technical assistance
teams in Nigeria and Liberia.
During his 30-year career in city management, his great
concern for municipal employees along with all the citys res-
idents was noted and his integrity was never in question.
During retirement, Walt worked as a consultant and interim
city manager, enjoying travel and golf. He was always active-
ly involved in the Lutheran church and is remembered with
love for his generosity, humor, caring and unfailing kindness.
He leaves his beloved wife of 64 years, Ann, three daughters,
the Rev. Susan Birkelo, Jennifer Ruttenberg, Elizabeth Zielke
and a son, Dr. Carl Birkelo, eight grandchildren and a brother,
Alden Birkelo.
A memorial service will be held 2 p.m. Saturday, July 14 at
Davis Lutheran Church (317 E. Eighth St., Davis, CA 95616).
Memorials may be given to Davis Lutheran Church, The
Nature Conservancy, Yolo Hospice or charity of your choice.
An online guestbook is available at
www.wiscombefuneral.com.
Rosemarie Beermann Ward
Rosemarie Beermann Ward died in Burlingame after a short
illness on July 10, 2012.
She was 93.
She was the wife of the late Glenn Ward and is survived by
her daughter Carol Afshar of Miwuk Village, her grandchil-
dren, Nader Afshar and Shiva Rose and great-grandchildren,
Charlotte and Colette McDermott. She was preceded in death
by her parents, Gustave and Edith Beerman, her sister, Irene
and her brother, Walter.
She was always there for family and friends in need and
was a second mother to many who will be greatly missed by
her family and her many friends.
Rosemarie was proud to be a native of San Francisco. One
of her rst jobs was working as a telephone operator at Pacic
Bell in downtown San Francisco. She was working the
boards when the announcement came of the attack on Pearl
Harbor. She later greatly enjoyed working at Lullaby Lane in
San Bruno for almost 25 years.
Her late husband was a military man, and the family lived in
many different places during his career. They settled in
Millbrae in the 1950s to buy a home and raise their daughter.
In her younger years, she was an excellent tennis player and
loved all animals and they loved her. Rosemarie was an avid
horsewoman and was one of the rst woman harness horse
jockeys. She rode a horse across the Golden Gate Bridge dur-
ing the opening day ceremonies. Rosemarie loved all outdoor
activities and especially enjoyed trout shing in the Sierras.
At her request, there will be no services.
In her memory, please consider a memorial contribution to
the Peninsula Humane Society.
Obituaries
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
An alleged would-be mugger accused
of stabbing a teenage Good Samaritan
who stepped in at his mothers urging will
stand trial on charges of attempted rob-
bery and assault with a deadly weapon.
Hector Mora, 29, has pleaded not
guilty but was held to answer after a pre-
liminary hearing yesterday. Judge Marta
Diaz also issued a protective order pre-
venting Mora from contacting the wit-
nesses.
San Mateo police arrested Mora April
12 not far from the Monte Diablo Avenue
overcrossing where they say he confront-
ed a 55-year-old Spanish-speaking man
with a knife and asked what he had in his
bag.
A San Mateo woman who spotted the
confrontation yelled to her sons, 17 and
20 and just home from church, and they
ran from their apartment to the bridge.
Mora allegedly raised the knife to the 17-
year-old, stabbing him in the hand and
forearm, before running away. The teen
required eight stitches.
Police arrested Mora nearby and the
victim and sons identied him.
He remains in custody in lieu of
$50,000 bail. He next appears in
Superior Court July 31 to enter a plea and
possibly set a trial date.
Good Samaritan stabbing suspect to trial
By Johathan Fahey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK A plunge in the price
of natural gas has made it cheaper for
utilities to produce electricity. But the
savings arent translating to lower rates
for customers. Instead, U.S. electricity
prices are going up.
Electricity prices are forecast to rise
slightly this summer. But any increase is
noteworthy because natural gas, which is
used to produce nearly a third of the
countrys power, is 43 percent cheaper
than a year ago. A long-term downward
trend in power prices could be starting to
reverse, analysts say.
Its caused us to scratch our heads,
says Tyler Hodge, an analyst at the
Energy Department who studies electric-
ity prices.
The recent heat wave that gripped
much of the country increased demand
for power as families cranked up their air
conditioners. And that may boost some
June utility bills.
Electric rates not falling along with fuel costs
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A teen who allegedly carjacked a car
seller after taking the advertised
Mustang for a test drive using a fake
gun to demand the pink slip while he
drove the handcuffed owner around
Daly City was ordered to stand trial
after a preliminary hearing at which the
victim testied about believing he was
going to die.
Jeremy Jenkins, 20, reportedly told
authorities after his arrest he made a
stupid mistake but after hearing from
the car seller and responding ofcers a
judge ruled the action also warranted
trial on charges of carjacking, kidnap-
ping during a carjacking and second-
degree robbery.
Jenkins reportedly responded to a
Craigslist ad April 23 and met the 26-
year-old owner at the Daly City BART
station. Jenkins allegedly put a gym bag
in the car prior to the test drive and
afterwards pulled a replica handgun and
ordered the man to handcuff himself.
Jenkins pulled a pillow case over the
mans head and placed him in the back
seat and demanded the pink slip,
according to the District Attorneys
Ofce.
When the man said the pink slip was at
home, Jenkins allegedly drove around
for 20 minutes before pulling into a
garage and having the man call his
mother. The woman, sensing something
was amiss when asked to bring the pink
slip to the BART station, called 911.
While BART police met with the moth-
er, the victim again called and the ofcer
was able to discern what was happening,
according to authorities.
The police waited at the BART park-
ing lot and when Jenkins arrived
detained him at gunpoint.
Jenkins remains in custody without
bail and returns to court July 27 to enter
a Superior Court plea.
Alleged carjacker to trial for kidnapping car seller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Gov. Jerry Brown
issued a furlough order Wednesday for
more than 11,000 California workers
whose unions have yet to reach a deal for
a 5 percent wage cut.
Browns order forces employees to
take one day of unpaid leave a month,
which amounts to a pay cut of about 5
percent.
Bruce Blanning, executive director of
the Professional Engineers in California
Government, said Wednesday that he
still hopes to reach a compromise with
Brown. His group wants the state to
eliminate private
contracts for work he
says can be done
cheaper by state
engineers.
We said we can
take a pay cut, just
dont outsource our
work at twice the
cost, Blanning
said.
California lawmakers passed a budget
last month authorizing the Democratic
governor to furlough state workers to
help save an estimated $402 million for
the year.
Unlike former Republican Gov.
Arnold Schwarzeneggers furlough
order, which created employee uproar,
most unions 19 of the states 21 labor
groups quickly reached agreements
with Brown before the new scal year
started July 1.
Only the two unions representing
11,600 state engineers and heavy
machinery operators continue to hold
out.
Employees must take one day off
within each pay period, according to
the order from the California
Department of Human Resources dated
July 5.
Gov.: Furloughs for last two labor groups
Jerry Brown
NATION/WORLD 7
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
s Contemporary Fine Art & Crafts
s Fabulous Food &Wine
s Home & Garden Exhibits
s Green Products Showcase
s Artisan Specialty Food Purveyors
s Health &Wellness Displays
s Microbrew &Wine Tasting Tent
s Chefs Demos Under A Shady Tent
Celebrity Chef/Author Joanne Weir,
12:45 p.m. Saturday
s AutoVino Collector Car Show
s Action-Packed Kids Fun Zone
s Stellar Lineup of Rockn Roll,
Blues, Jazz & Party Music
s Saturday Twilight Concert
Featuring THE BIG DIG, Sensational
Party/Dance Band
5:30 - 8 p.m. in Fremont Park
s Radio Disney Road Crew
Games, Music and Prizes
s Bicycle Parking in the
Coldwell Banker Lot, 930
Santa Cruz Ave., Sponsored by
the Rotary Club of Menlo Park
s Free Admission
www.menloparkchamber.com
Info-line: 650-325-2818 | www.miramarevents.com
July 21-22, 10am-6pm
Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park
Get Our Free, New
Festival M
obile App!
FOR APPLE &ANDROID DEVICES
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Pressing an elec-
tion-year point, Republicans pushed yet
another bill through the House on
Wednesday to repeal the nations two-
year-old health care law, a maneuver that
forced Democrats to choose between
President Barack Obamas signature
domestic achievement and a public that
is persistently skeptical of its value.
The vote was 244-185, with five
Democratic defectors siding with
Republicans.
By Republican count, the vote marked
the 33rd time in 18 months that the tea
party-infused GOP majority has tried to
eliminate, defund or otherwise scale
back the program opponents scorn-
fully call it Obamacare since the
GOP took control of the House.
Repeal this year by Congress is
doomed, since the Democratic-con-
trolled Senate will never agree.
But Illinois Rep.
Peter Roskam said
before joining other
Republicans in
Wednesdays House
vote: Heres the
good news. The vot-
ers get the last word
in November. Stay
tuned.
Nor was the vote
in the House the only act of political the-
ater during the day as campaign con-
cerns increasingly crowded out biparti-
san attempts at law-making in the
Capitol.
One day after a campaigning Obama
called on Congress to pass his proposal
to extend tax cuts on all but the highest
wage earners, Senate Republican leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky offered
to allow an immediate vote. I cant see
why Democrats wouldnt want to give
him the chance to sign the bill, he said.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid,
D-Nev., countered by blocking an imme-
diate vote. Well get to the tax issues.
That way well be able to talk in more
detail about Governor Romneys taxes,
he said in a reference to Democratic
campaign attacks on the GOP presiden-
tial candidates overseas investment, the
relatively low rate of income tax he is
required to pay and his refusal thus far to
release personal tax returns dating
before 2010.
The health care debate roiled the cam-
paign for the White House as well as
Congress.
Republican presidential candidate
Mitt Romney drew boos from his large-
ly black audience at the NAACP con-
vention when he vowed to wipe out
Obamas overhaul.
In the House, Republicans assailed the
law as a job-killing threat to the eco-
nomic recovery, but Democrats said
repeal would eliminate consumer pro-
tections that already have affected mil-
lions.
GOP House votes to kill health law
Romney booed for
hitting Obamacare
By Kasie Hunt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOUSTON Uninching before a skeptical NAACP
crowd, Mitt Romney declared Wednesday hed do more for
African-Americans than Barack Obama, the nations rst black
president. He drew jeers when he lambasted the Democrats
policies.
If you want a president who will make things better in the
African-American community, you are looking at him,
Romney told the groups annual convention. Pausing as some in
the crowd heckled, he added, You take a look!
For real? yelled someone in the crowd.
The reception was occasionally rocky though generally polite
as the Republican presidential candidate sought to woo a
Democratic bloc that voted heavily for Obama four years ago
and is certain to do so again. Romney was booed when he vowed
to repeal Obamacare the Democrats signature health care
measure and the crowd interrupted him when he accused
Obama of failing to spark a more robust economic recovery.
I know the president has said he will do those things. But he
has not. He cannot. He will not, Romney said as the crowds
murmurs turned to groans.
At other points, Romney earned scattered clapping for his
promises to create jobs and improve education. In an interview
with Fox News after the speech, Romney said he had expected
the negative reaction to some of his comments. I am going to
give the same message to the NAACP that I give across the
country which is that Obamacare is killing jobs, he said.
Four months before the election, Romneys appearance at the
NAACP convention was a direct, aggressive appeal for support
from across the political spectrum in what polls show is a close
contest. Romney doesnt expect to win a majority of black vot-
ers 95 percent backed Obama in 2008 but hes trying to
show independent and swing voters that hes willing to reach out
to diverse audiences, while demonstrating that his campaign and
the Republican Party he leads are inclusive.
The stakes are high. Romneys chances in battleground states
such as North Carolina, Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania
which have huge numbers of blacks who helped Obama win
four years ago will improve if he can cut into the presidents
advantage by persuading black voters to support him or if they
stay home on Election Day.
Last drugs standing: Key
Alzheimers results coming
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Were about to nd out if there will be a way anytime soon
to slow the course of Alzheimers disease. Results are due
within a month or so from key studies of two drugs that aim to
clear the sticky plaque gumming up patients brains.
A pivotal study of a third drug will end later this year, and
results from a small, early test of it will be reported next week
at an Alzheimers conference in Vancouver, British Columbia.
These three treatments are practically the last men stand-
ing in late-stage trials, after more than a decade of failed
efforts to develop a drug to halt the mind-robbing disease.
Current medicines such as Aricept and Namenda just tem-
porarily ease symptoms. There is no known cure.
Experts say that if these fail, drug companies may pull out of
the eld in frustration, leaving little hope for the millions of
people with the disease. An estimated 35 million people world-
wide have dementia, which includes Alzheimers. In the U.S.,
experts say about 5 million have Alzheimers.
The three treatments being tested are not even drugs in the
traditional, chemical sense. They are antibodies proteins
made by the immune system that promote clearance of amy-
loid, the stuff that forms the plaque.
Its a strategy with a checkered history, and scientists arent
even sure that amyloid causes Alzheimers or that removing it
will do any good in people who already have symptoms. But
there are some hopeful signs they may be on the right track.
REUTERS
Mitt Romney speaks at the NAACP convention in Houston.
Barack Obama
By Christopher Torchia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISTANBUL The Syrian ambassador
to Iraq has defected, denouncing President
Bashar Assad in a TV statement
Wednesday, becoming the most senior
diplomat to abandon the regime during a
bloody 16-month uprising.
Nawaf Fares, a former provincial gover-
nor, is the second prominent Syrian to
break with the regime in less than a week.
Brig. Gen. Manaf Tlass, an Assad con-
dant and son of a former defense minister,
ed Syria last week, buoying Western
powers and anti-regime activists, who
expressed hope that other high-ranking
defections would follow.
The high-level defections could be a
sign that Assads tightly wrapped regime is
unraveling, but it was too early to be cer-
tain. There have been thousands of defec-
tions in the past, mostly low-level army
conscripts, but until now no one as senior
as the general and the ambassador had
ed.
In a statement broadcast on the Arabic
satellite channel Al-Jazeera, Fares said he
was resigning and joining the opposition.
Wearing a dark suit and reading from a
prepared text in what appeared to be a
large ofce, Fares harshly criticized Assad.
Im announcing from this moment on
that Im siding with the revolution in
Syria, he said, according to the Al-Jazeera
translation into English.
Opposition: Syrias Iraq ambassador has defected
LOCAL/NATION 8
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Rating American
airlinesoptions
By Scott Mayerowitz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK American Airlines is weighing various
options for its future, but most analysts say the nations No. 3 air-
line only has one viable choice: combine with No. 5 US Airways.
American could leave bankruptcy protection as an independent
company. Or join forces with a much smaller airline such as
JetBlue or Frontier. There has been talk of a tie-up with United or
Delta, the nations two biggest airlines, or possibly a large infu-
sion of cash from either a foreign airline or a private equity rm.
Some of those scenarios might be wishful thinking while oth-
ers will at least be vetted by management. Tom Horton,
CEO of Americans parent AMR Corp., said Tuesday that he is
now evaluating a range of strategic options, including potential
mergers. Here are some of the possibilities:
US AIRWAYS MERGER
If you listen to Wall Street, this is the only outcome that makes
sense. Analysts say the airlines have somewhat complementary
route networks and both are too small to thrive on their own.
Investors agree the price of US Airways Group Inc. stock has
more than tripled since Nov. 28, when American led for bank-
ruptcy.
US Airways CEO Doug Parker has aggressively pushed for a
combination. He won the support of Americans three largest
unions their leaders even posed for photos with him at the
companys annual meeting. Thats where he gave a slide presen-
tation showing that the combined airline would have the largest
market share east of the Rockies.
In many ways, Parker is right: both airlines have to merge.
In the last ve years, Delta combined with Northwest and
United joined with Continental to create two behemoths that con-
trol nearly 60 percent of the market. American, which was once
the worlds largest carrier, has just under 20 percent of the mar-
ket and US Airways has another 10 percent. Teaming up, they
would be on par with Delta and United.
They just arent going to be competitive without merging
together, said Robert Herbst, an independent airline analyst.
American would gain feeder ights from smaller cities to its
hubs as well as US Airways lucrative shuttle service between
New York, Boston and Washington D.C. US Airways would gain
higher-prot international routes.
Still, there would be headaches. Seven years ago, America
West bought US Airways out of bankruptcy, taking its name. The
two airlines still have not merged staffs, with former America
West pilots only ying with other former America West pilots.
Adding American to the mix will complicate matters but could
also help. The larger American unions would have enough voting
power to outweigh any of the disagreements between the two US
Airways labor groups.
American still has the exclusive right in the bankruptcy process
See OPTIONS, Page 10
T
he Port of Redwood Citys
annual PortFest won the
equivalent of a bronze medal
by the American Association of Port
Authorities which honored the port in
the special events category against
other ports from throughout North
America, the Caribbean and Latin
America. Check out what makes
PortFest so special at its third annual
event Oct. 6. This years fest will
include Bay rides in both small and
large boats.
***
This month, Wisnoms Hardware in
San Mateo is partnering with
Operation Shoebox, a goods distribu-
tion organization for our troops, to
supply those serving our country over-
seas with support and basic essentials.
In honor of Wisnoms employee Chris,
who is currently serving in
Afghanistan, the store will be accept-
ing donations the entire month of July
and will be holding card-making ses-
sions each Saturday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Each person who makes a donation or
a card will receive $5 off their pur-
chase of $25 or more. Now theres a
cause we can all get behind.
Wisnoms is at 545 First Ave. For
more information, stop by or call 348-
1082.
***
American Legion Post No. 409 in
San Bruno has established a Military
Books Library. Those looking to read
or borrow a military book, or donate
such a book, should stop by the post at
757 San Mateo Ave. in San Bruno.
***
As of July 4, the following beaches
and creeks had elevated levels of bac-
teria and have been closed to recre-
ational use until further notice, accord-
ing to the countys Environmental
Health division Fitzgerald Marine
Reserve, Capistrano Beach, Outer
Harbor south of boat launch at Pillar
Point and Calera, San Pedro, San
Vicente, Frenchmans, Pilarcitos and
San Gregorio creeks. More info on
closures is available at San Mateo
Countys Beach/Creek Posting
Hotline announcement at 599-1266.
***
Sustainable San Mateo County is
mourning the passing of Board Chair
Emeritus Ruth Peterson who it
describes as amazing, smart, funny,
ambitious, visionary and inspiring. A
memorial service is being held at 4:30
p.m. Thursday, July 12 at the
Redwood City Elks Lodge in Emerald
Hills. Attendees are asked to RSVP at
ruthsmemorial@gmail.com and dona-
tions can be made in her honor to
Sustainable San Mateo through
www.JustGive.org.
***
Since its launch late last month,
Redwood Citys video chat service
with the police department has aver-
aged 30 to 35 calls per day. The public
can use the service for online help with
any concerns or questions about police
services, report crimes, handle trafc
complaints or abandoned vehicles and
direct users to other city departments.
The department is looking at expand-
ing hours into the weekend and
evening and adding bilingual ofcers if
customer usage warrants it. Live guide
is available at
www.redwoodcity.org/police.
***
Interested to know how four cities
share the cost of one re chief? As are
we. Don Dornell is currently in charge
of Central County Fire, consisting of
Burlingame and Hillsborough, as well
as the San Bruno and Millbrae re
departments. Dornell added Millbrae
and San Bruno to his plate in late May
after the retirement of chief Dennis
Haag. Having Dornell take over makes
sense as the four cities are exploring
options of consolidating re services.
However, a contract outlining
Dornells new role, pay and what each
city pays into that is not yet nal. City
managers hope to nalize the contract
in the next 30 days.
***
Burlingame Councilwoman Terry
Nagel has started a new communica-
tions consulting business called Terry
Nagel Communications. She is an
experienced journalist who has worked
at the San Francisco Chronicle and
Forbes magazine. In her new busi-
ness, she helps clients from corpora-
tions to small nonprots with writing,
editing, press kits, annual reports,
media outreach, web content and e-
campaigns.
The reporters notebook is a weekly collec-
tion of facts culled from the notebooks of
the Daily Journal staff. It appears in the
Thursday edition.
Reporters notebook
Capuchino music teacher
admits student affair
The Capuchino High School music
director who carried on a months-long
affair with a 17-year-old student plead-
ed no contest the week of July 13, 2007
to felony statutory rape and oral copula-
tion with a minor in return for no more
than 16 months in prison.
Adam Glen Albrecht, 28, changed his
plea at a Superior Court review hearing
that week, two weeks after he resigned
his job and was arrested by Broadmoor
police.
Albrecht also pleaded no contest to a
misdemeanor count of contributing to
the delinquency of a minor.
Albrecht and a 17-year-old female
student allegedly began a six-month
sexual relationship which carried on
until June 2007 when her mother dis-
covered the incidents through cellular
phone bills.
Packed Belmont streets
prompt zoning change
To combat overcrowded streets in
Belmont, the City Council the week of
July 13, 2007 approved a set of zoning
amendments to make it tougher for resi-
dents to add on to their home without
adding garage space.
The city had struggled to address
overcrowded streets for several years
prior by drafting ordinances that trig-
ger the need for extra garage space if a
resident applies for a large addition.
However, residents were getting cre-
ative with the way they dened certain
rooms of their home and refusing to
park cars in their garages.
The rules specied an applicant must
have a two-car garage and two uncov-
ered parking spaces for any home
adding 600 or more square feet of gross
oor area, that will become 3,000
square feet or larger or creates four or
more bedrooms. The council voted that
week to add additional language that
make any houses already 3,000 square
feet or with four or more bedrooms
subject to the same rules.
Bair Island repairs to begin
The much-anticipated environmental
restoration of inner Bair Island in
Redwood City began the week of July
13, 2007 and it meant partial closures
of popular hiking trails.
Trucks were set to deliver an estimat-
ed 1 million cubic yards of dirt to raise
the level of the island the rst step in
its restoration to a natural tidal wetland.
Bair Island is a 3,000-acre portion of
the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay
National Wildlife Refuge and an esti-
mated 250,000 people visit annually.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
was undertaking the restoration of
about 1,400 acres of Bair Island, to
return it to its natural condition as tidal
wetlands a recovery from its historic
human use as grazing lands and salt
evaporation ponds.
From the archives highlights stories original-
ly printed ve years ago this week. It appears
in the Thursday edition of the Daily Journal.
OPINION 9
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
The Bakerseld Californian
C
alifornias relentless march away
from educational advancement and
enrichment continues unabated, as
two recent developments attest.
This week, the board of governors of
Californias community college system voted
to further scale back what was once a source
of great pride for California: The dual role of
community colleges as an academic and
vocational starting point for high school
graduates who may not be ready for a univer-
sity, and a place for members of the commu-
nity to enjoy enrichment courses. The
boards decision restricts students in the lat-
ter category; enrollees will no longer be per-
mitted to repeat courses in, say, pottery or
weight training. Resources strained by reces-
sionary budget cuts have forced community
colleges to focus on their primary mission:
academic and vocational preparation.
Thats the proper approach, of course,
given the present state of Californias econo-
my, but the state is a little worse for it. The
community in community college wont
quite mean the same.
Of greater concern is the direction adult
education is headed in California. Adult
schools that have played a vital role in build-
ing communities and redirecting vulnerable
populations toward productivity have taken
big hits in recent years. A survey by
EdSource, an education nonprot, found that
23 of the state s 30 largest school districts
have made signicant cuts to their adult edu-
cation programs since 2007.
Why? Because they can. Districts forced to
cope with the continuing state budget crisis
have been granted new exibility in how they
use funding previously earmarked for specif-
ic areas, including adult education, and many
have opted to de-emphasize it. And that
works to the detriment of some of the states
most at-risk adults, including the disabled,
the unemployed and the elderly, as well as
ex-offenders trying to re-establish themselves
and immigrants studying to become U.S. citi-
zens.
Theres a price to pay for these sacrices,
ranging from a diminished quality of life to
the economic harm that arises when people
who, denied the opportunity to improve
themselves, rely on state aid instead of work-
ing and paying taxes.
Oh boy, high-speed rail!
Editor,
The rst section is a track in the middle of
the state, in nowhere land? I guess when the
funding runs out way before completion it
will make a nice tourist attraction of sorts
(tomato train)? And the jobs? Lets see if it
goes like the recent Bay Bridge and the
BART car contracts, which equaled Chinese
engineering, Chinese steel and
French/Canadian cars. Sounds like lots of job
creation for other countries. Oh I forgot,
maybe we can lay the tracks this time instead
of Chinese laborers. Too bad this country can
no longer make anything. Why dont we
build the cars in Detroit? There are plenty of
empty auto plants there. Why cant we mill
our own steel? Too expensive? At least the
money stays in the country and circulates
multiple times. With the way the unemploy-
ment rate is in this country, maybe its time
to insert a buy American clause into all
public works projects. Theyre our tax dollars
and I personally would rather pay more to
keep our countrymen working.
Robert L. Lingaas
San Mateo
Support high-speed rail
Editor,
I will most certainly be riding high-speed
rail from Northern California to Southern
California when its built.
California is completely saturated with
highways and roads all of them clogged
with trafc. We cant simply just add another
lane to the Interstate 5 or any other highway
and expect that travel times will be reduced.
The cost to simply just add another lane to a
highway is a tremendous expense that were
used to paying as Californians. But no more.
With high-speed rail, there will be a more
efcient and ultimately a lower cost way to
get up and down this state, minus the car and
airport nightmares.
Im in full support of high-speed rail!
Sean Carney
San Francisco
False analogy
Editor,
In his letter Response to mandates (pub-
lished in the July 7-8 weekend edition of the
Daily Journal), Arthur Collom likens the
national health insurance mandate to the
requirement for carrying auto insurance. This
is a false analogy.
Driving is a privilege and is at its core a
voluntary activity, as the vehicle codes and
drivers handbooks in all 50 states are fond of
reminding us. To receive this privilege, all
drivers must carry liability and other insur-
ance.
Simply existing, on the other hand, is not
voluntary (suicide is illegal most everywhere,
after all). And I doubt that even Mr. Collom
would consider it a privilege granted by the
state.
Andrew Daniels
Menlo Park
Pedestrian safety issues
continue at Fox Plaza Lane
Editor,
Fox Plaza Lane is an alley in Burlingame
that demonstrates the citys legacy of allow-
ing unprotected street crossings and endan-
gering residents. (See City of Burlingame,
CA pedestrian cross walk threat dangerously
too high (planetshifter.com/node/1792) and
A safety are from Burlingame, CA (plan-
etshifter.com/node/1534).)
Consider the following safety issues:
This sidewalk or alley path is in dire
need of repainting;
The path is about three feet wide and
unsafe for two people;
This path abruptly ends at the corner of
Fox Mall Shopping Center;
From the abrupt corner ending, pedestri-
ans are unprotected for the rest of way up
until Walgreens;
This primary pedestrian path was
approved by the citys Planning Commission;
There are no trafc signs to slow autos at
the rear entrance of Fox Mall;
There are two small signs on the exit
doors inside a dark Fox Mall, but both signs
are easily missed if the doors are propped
open;
Pedestrians are walking down the middle
of the lane;
There are no warning signs for pedestrians
anywhere;
There is yellow handicap warning materi-
al from the parking lot; and
There is no posted speed limit anywhere.
Here are my recommendations:
Turn the lane into one way road headed
east;
Update the existing alley path to a two
pedestrian standard;
The path should be restriped;
Continue the larger pedestrian path until
the end of the lane;
Place standing warning signs at Fox Mall
to slow drivers;
Enforce a maximum speed limit of 10
mph; and
Place yellow handicap warning material at
the Fox Mall entrance.
Burlingame Public Works Director Syed
Murtuza stated last week that staff will
study your concerns and include it at a future
Trafc Safety and Parking Commission
meeting agenda.
Willi Paul
Burlingame
Education takes a couple more punches
Other voices
Be mime
M
ime or clown of course that was
the newsroom question of the day
and so much more difcult a
choice than Obama versus Romney. Odd
entertainers dont always split so evenly down
party lines.
Clowns are scary
but mimes cant
speak. Clowns get
a car (along with
18 friends) but
mimes dont have
to shoot water out
of owers or wear
oversized shoes.
Clowns have red
noses and juggle.
Their outts are
more forgiving
although black is
admittedly slimming. Both are stuck with an
overabundance of face paint and most of their
fans are children with short attention spans.
But mimes have an excuse to tune out the
world and put themselves in a box which isnt
too shabby for those anti-social moments.
I chose clown. Then switched to mime.
Then back to clown. Then considered if those
silver-painted gentlemen at Fishermans
Wharf counted as mimes.
None of this helped solve the real question
at hand: How to best celebrate Bastille Day.
Thats right, Saturday, July 14 marks
Bastille Day which is actually named French
National Day and commemorates the storm-
ing of what else? the fortress prison.
Why not celebrate? When in Rome of
course, were not actually in Rome and were
certainly not in France. Bastille doesnt even
rate a mention on the desk calendar even
though the year does include something called
Civic Day that apparently is a Canadian
holiday. Even Boxing Day and Victoria Day
get nods although I couldnt even begin to
explain either of those occasions.
But since when do Americans limit them-
selves to only celebrating holidays within their
own borders? St. Patricks Day anyone? Cinco
de Mayo? Chinese New Year? Chances are
good the U.S. population is more keen on cel-
ebrating those holidays than more traditionally
American days like presidential birthdays or
Memorial Day. Everybody loves the day off
but the majority frankly doesnt take much
time to really appreciate the reason behind
them.
I wonder if those in other parts of the globe
make a point to celebrate American holidays
just for the heck of it. The British certainly
have no reason to party on the Fourth of July
but what about other countries? Maybe
Lithuanians are big on Thanksgiving. Perhaps
the Danes are really into Martin Luther King
Day.
Something makes me think the love of a
holiday, no matter how silly or foreign, is
more an American trait. That affection proba-
bly explains odd days, albeit unofcially, such
as National Fried Chicken Day although
International Talk Like a Pirate Day must also
be noted.
In any case, generally if a day calls for gifts,
drinking or pyrotechnics, Americans are in.
Bastille Day could call for all of the above,
short maybe the gifts unless miniature prison
snow globes count. But how exactly to cele-
brate like a true Frenchman?
Drink wine, of course, or maybe
Champagne. Smear some brie on a baguette.
Dust off A Tale of Two Cities and crank up
Les Miserables. Make a crepe. Act snotty.
Eat foie gras but only on the Presidio.
Make a former model the rst lady. Suggest
the guillotine make a comeback if lethal injec-
tion doesnt survive the endless court injunc-
tions. Chomp on snails and frogs legs. Wear a
beret.
And of course, berets always lead to mimes
which in turn lead to clowns.
Thank goodness an online petition exists to
create Talk in Non Sequitur Day.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email:
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,604.53 -0.38% 10-Yr Bond 1.498 0.00%
Nasdaq2,887.98 -0.49% Oil (per barrel) 86.139999
S&P 500 1,341.45 -0.00% Gold 1,576.30
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The stock market
mostly recovered from an afternoon
slump to end with slight losses.
In minutes from their latest meeting
released Wednesday afternoon, Federal
Reserve ofcials said they saw a variety
of threats to the U.S. economy, including
a slowdown in China and a looming
budget crunch in Washington. The Fed
also didnt signal that new steps to stim-
ulate the economy were on the way.
Stock investors took the news badly at
rst, but by the end of the day were tak-
ing it in stride. The Dow Jones industri-
al average dropped as many as 118
points shortly after the 2 p.m. release of
the Feds minutes. Thanks to a recovery
in the last hour it was down just 48
points at the closing bell, not much dif-
ferent from where it was earlier.
Fed ofcials said the economy could
struggle if Congress fails to avert tax
hikes and across-the-board spending
cuts scheduled for the end of the year.
They also worried that Europes debt cri-
sis and Chinas slower growth would
weigh on the U.S.
But it was what the Fed didnt say that
really tripped the stock market up, said
Steven Ricchiuto, chief economist at
Mizuho Securities USA. He said many
traders had hoped to see evidence that
the Fed was prepared to pull the trigger
on a new bond-buying effort to prod the
economy forward.
They didnt get what they wanted to
see, Ricchiuto said.
The Dow closed at 12,604.53, down
48.59 points. The Standard & Poors 500
index slipped 0.02 of a point to 1,341.45.
The technology-focused Nasdaq com-
posite index lost 14.35 points to
2,887.98.
It was the fth straight day of losses
for both the Dow and S&P. Thats the
worst stretch for both since a six-day
losing streak that ran through May 18.
With Europe still working out the details
of a bailout for Spanish banks and the
U.S. economy still sluggish, theres little
for investors to buy stocks.
The bottom line is that there arent a
lot of investors willing to put money into
this market, said Jeff Kleintop, chief
market strategist at LPL Financial.
Theres not much to get excited about.
The current batch of U.S. corporate
earnings, which started to come in this
week, isnt expected to help the stock
market.
Stocks close lower again
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
VeriFone Systems Inc., up $3.49 at $35.41
The electronic payments company said it won
a $35 million contract to install its systems in
6,500 Washington, D.C., cabs.
Trina Solar Ltd., up 30 cents at $6.20
The solar module maker is expanding to
Canada with an ofce in Ontario, the second-
biggest North American market for solar panels.
Abercrombie & Fitch Co., up $1.35 at $34.12
The New York Post reported that the teen
retailer may be launching a share buyback plan
and scaling back its European expansion.
The Wendys Co., up 11 cents at $4.69
A Wedbush analyst upgraded the hamburger
chains stock rating, saying that it predicts the
company will have continued growth.
Hhgregg Inc., down $4.20 at $7.34
The appliance and electronics retailer cut its
full-year forecast and posted rst-quarter
guidance below Wall Street expectations.
Harley-Davidson Inc., down $2.27 at $44.82
A Citi analyst said that his research, collected
from the motorcycle makers dealers, showed
that sales growth slowed in June.
Goldcorp Inc., down $3.58 at $33.17
The Canadian mining company lowered its
production guidance for the year because of
operational problems at two of its mines.
Nasdaq
Healthcare Services Group Inc., up $1.45 at
$21.08
The company, which provides housekeeping
and food services to hospitals, said its prot
grew 15 percent in the second quarter.
Big movers
to work out a restructuring plan that is acceptable to the court and
its creditors. If it doesnt nd an acceptable merger partner, it
could go it alone.
INDEPENDENT AMERICAN
Prior to this week, Americans management said it wanted
remain independent, vowing to emerge from bankruptcy protec-
tion as a more competitive, nancially sound airline.
Indeed, American is using the bankruptcy process to slash
employee wages. It also has an ambitious plan to replace its
planes with newer, more fuel-efcient models.
But it still doesnt have the size or route network to compete
with other airlines. Domestically, it is often undercut by low-cost
airlines like Spirit Airlines Inc. and Virgin America.
Internationally, it faces erce competition from Delta and United
as well as foreign airlines like Air France and Dubais Emirates.
In order to survive independently, American would have to beef
up its presence on the East Coast and West Coast. That would
mean expanding at a time when the rest of the industry has been
cutting ights to deal with decreasing demand.
MERGING WITH DELTA OR UNITED
A deal with Delta Air Lines or United, part of United
Continental Holdings Inc. might make nancial sense. But any
such combination would control such a large share of ights that
anti-trust regulators would likely vote thumbs down.
The Department of Transportation has been trying to let small-
er airlines like Southwest Airlines, JetBlue Airways Corp. and
Virgin America compete in some markets such as New York and
Washington, D.C. The Department of Justice did allow
Southwest and AirTran to merge but to put that in perspective, a
merged American-United would be more than three times as
large as the combined Southwest-AirTran.
Theres no way that the DOJ and the DOT are going to let
Delta or United in any way, shape or form to get any part of
American Airlines, said Herbst.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Apples with-
drawal from an environmental ratings
registry has prompted at least one city
San Francisco to stop buying its com-
puters.
The decision does not apply to iPads
or iPhones. But Francis Tsang,
spokesman for Mayor Edwin Lees
ofce, says the citys rules require that
laptops, computers and monitors comply
with the registrys requirements.
Late last month, Apple Inc. told the
nonprot EPEAT, short for Electronic
Product Environmental Assessment
Tool, to remove its products from its reg-
istry. It also plans to stop submitting its
products to EPEAT for environmental
ratings.
EPEAT is an industry standard that
seeks to make it easier for customers to
buy environmentally friendly electron-
ics. Manufacturers still participating
include Dell Inc., Hewlett-Packard,
Lenovo, Samsung and Sony.
Apple did not respond to messages for
comment Wednesday afternoon.
Although it pulled out of the environ-
mental registry, Apple has long pointed
to its environmental track record. On the
environment section of is website,
Apple says it reports environmental
impact comprehensively. We do this by
focusing on our products: what happens
when we design them, what happens
when we make them, and what happens
when you take them home and use
them.
For example, the Cupertino, Calif.-
based company has replaced many of the
hazardous materials in its gadgets with
less harmful and more recyclable ones,
and has designed longer-life batteries for
its computers, media players and
phones. Its recycling program offers gift
cards to people who send in their old
Apple gadgets for recycling.
Apple pulls out of environmental ratings registry
Continued from page 8
OPTIONS
<< Warriors trade Wright, acquire Jack, page 14
No deal for Howard yet, page 12
Thursday, July 12, 2012
SERENA OUT SWINGING: WIMBLEDON CHAMPION WINS FIRST MATCH AT STANFORD >>> PAGE 15
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
There is a bit of a Little League renaissance
going on in the city of Pacica.
In 2011, the Pacica American 10-11 All-
Star team captured its rst District 52 cham-
pionship in about 20 years.
Wednesday, the 2012 9-10 Pacifica
American All-Star team added to the growing
legacy by beating Foster City 5-3 to claim the
organizations rst-ever 9-10 district crown.
Its huge, said Pacica American manag-
er Steve Falk. I think half the city is here.
Hopefully they got there early because
Pacica got off to a quick start, scoring all ve
of its runs in the rst two innings before
Foster City reliever Lopeti Pierre shut down
Pacica for the last three innings.
Unfortunately for Foster City, the damage
had been done.
Pacica is a great team, said Foster City
manager Mike Callagy. [My] guys hung in
and did their best to the end.
Wednesdays championship game was a far
cry from the rst meeting between the two
squads a 11-0, four-inning shellacking of
Foster City at the hands of Pacica American
in the winners bracket nal last week.
[Foster City] came out to play today, Falk
said. I knew they would come in here red
up.
Foster City had the rst chance to get on the
scoreboard, loading the bases in the top of the
rst inning, but coming up empty. With one
out, Shane Stewart singled to center.
Following a foul out, Drew Aspillera and
Jonathan Santos had back-to-back base hits to
load the bases, but Pacica starter Andrew
Harkness got out of the jam on a ground out
to shortstop.
Pacifica American promptly loaded the
bases in the bottom of the frame, but unlike
Foster City, Pacica took advantage. With one
out, Christian Falk doubled to left. Following
a groundout, Elijah Ricks and Chris
Rodriguez drew back-to-back walks to load
the bases. Shane Hawkins drew Pacificas
third walk in a row, driving in Falk in the
process. Michael Bigler also walked to drive
in the second run of the inning, giving
Pacifica American a 2-0 lead after one
inning.
(Scoring early) put everyone at ease,
Pacifica American wins first 9-10 title
New champ crowned
Foster City snaps Hillsborough run onDistrict 52 Majors titles
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Foster Citys JJ Ota tags out Hillsboroughs Henry James to complete a 4-3-5 double play in
the bottom of the rst inning during his teams 3-1 win in the District 52 Majors title game.
States best
are honored
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Hanging on the wall inside the Aragon
girls soccer team room are the jerseys from
former players who have gone on to play at
the college level following their time as a
Don.
Come the 2012-2013 season, the No. 2 jer-
sey will nd a home on that wall.
Dominican University announced earlier
this week that Nicole Rodrick, a midelder on
the Central Coast Section-winning Aragon
soccer team, will put on the Penguin uniform
as part of the incoming freshman class.
In the end, I just wanted to stay close to my
family in case I needed anything they would-
nt be too far away, Rodrick said of a choice
that came between Dominican and The
University of New Jersey.
I think its a good decision, said Aragon
head coach Will Colglazier. Shes denitely
going to be closer to home and I cant wait to
go see her play.
In three varsity seasons, Rodrick played in
35 games, scored six goals and tallied eight
assists. But her contribution to the Dons
extended beyond the stat sheet.
She has something you cant coach, she
has vision, Colglazier said. She sees the
game, shes able to make those passes. Shes
our (Spain midfielder) Xavi (Hernandez).
Shes in the center of the eld for us, making
amazing through balls. She was quite impor-
tant to our success.
Rodricks trek to Dominican is a story of
resolve, considering that the now Aragon
graduate missed the rst half of her senior
season when she failed to make grades.
It was kind of like senioritis, pretty much
it bites you in the butt, Rodrick said. But
with the support of my family, my friends and
my team, I was able to nally pick up my
grades so I could help the team out the best
way that I could on the eld.
When she wasnt playing, she was a great
cheerleader for us, Colglazier said, adding
that Rodrick picked up the teams Spirit
Award at years end. She is actually very tac-
tically smart. She didnt just ball-watch from
Rodrick heading to Dominican University
See DON, Page 12
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The District 52 Little League Majors cham-
pionship has shined with the red and blue of
Hillsborough eight of the last nine years. Its a
mountain theyve owned; a kingdom theyve
ruled with an iron st.
That is until 2012. At least for this year, there
is a new king and he wears a Foster City All-
Stars jersey.
Behind the phenomenal pitching of Dominic
Monozon and a pair of clutch hits, Foster City
beat Hillsborough 3-1 to capture their rst
District 52 Majors title in 20 years.
It feels great, said Foster City head coach
Steve Sutter. Ive been doing this for ve
years. Weve been champing at the bit to get
this. The kids have played their butts off for
ve straight games. Its unbelievable how well
theyve played. Pitching, defense, timely hits,
its incredible. Ive never seen them play bet-
ter.
The road to Titletown wasnt easy but Foster
City sure made it look that way. In ve games,
the black and teal outscored their opponents
32-6 and had to beat the reigning champions
twice.
Thats makes it extra sweet, Sutter said.
Ive been telling the boys earlier that, theyve
(Hillsborough) got the reputation. We want to
knock them off the mountain top. When we
were worried about who we were going to play
today, I said we want Hillsborough. We want
to beat the best. We knew theyre the best.
It feels good, Monozon said, because its
just been so hard through it all.
Monozon knows a little something about
overcoming adversity. On Saturday, the right
hander lasted only 30 pitches, failing to nd
his groove in a game against San Mateo
American.
I told him, youre going to come back at
See CHAMPS, Page 16
C
al Hi Sports released its State
Schools of the Year Wednesday,
which ranks the top prep athletic
programs in California. Not surprisingly, a
team from the Peninsula Athletic League
failed to make the list, but there is still
plenty of interesting information about
high-school athletic programs with which
many fans are famil-
iar.
Heres just a few
interesting tidbits
about some of the
schools:
The overall State
School of the Year
was Concords De La
Salle, which any self-
respecting high
school sports fan
knows is one of the
top athletic programs
in the country. DLS
had ve teams ranked
in the top-10 in the state and won seven
North Coast Section Division I champi-
onships: football, cross country, boys soc-
cer, wrestling, boys basketball, baseball
and boys volleyball.
Since DLS is an all-boys school, it has
less teams competing. A coed school has
both boys and girls athletics factored into
the equation and the Spartans still came out
on top.
As if public school teams didnt already
dislike the Mitty girls athletic programs,
heres one more reason.
Cal Hi Sports selected the Monarchs as
the top girls athletic program in the state.
They won the Division II state basketball
championship, while the softball team n-
ished in the top 10 in the nation. They had
three other teams nish rst or second in
Central Coast Section championship
appearances and advanced to the seminals
in eld hockey and girls tennis, as well.
See LOUNGE, Page 16
See PACIFICA, Page 12
Shark sign SF Bulls as ECHL affiliate
SAN JOSE The San Jose Sharks have
signed an afliation agreement with the San
Francisco Bulls of the ECHL for the 2012-13
season.
The agreement announced Wednesday
makes the Bulls the development afliate for
the teams inaugural season in San Francisco.
The Bulls will play their home games at the
Cow Palace, where the Sharks played their
rst two NHL seasons prior to moving to San
Jose in 1993.
The Worcester Sharks will still serve as San
Joses American Hockey League afliate.
Sharks assistant general manager Wayne
Thomas said in a statement that our organi-
zations share the same passion to put a strong,
competitive product on the ice, as well as
being an active member in our shared Bay
Area communities.
Steve Falk said. They had the nerves going.
So did I.
Foster City promptly loaded the bases again
in the top of the second. Despite pushing
across one run, it was unable to make it a big-
ger inning. Reece Gardon led off the inning
with a single and Kevin Callagy added a one-
out single. Tommy Ozawa also singled to load
the bases. Stewart came to the plate and drove
in one run with a single to center, but the
game-tying run was cut down at the plate and
Pacica escaped the inning clinging to a 2-1
lead.
Pacica gave itself some breathing room
with a three-run second, loading the bases for
the second time in as many innings. With one
out, Tyler Shaw and Falk singled, while
Harkness drew a walk to load the bases. Ricks
followed and on a 2-2 offering, smoked a shot
hard off the fence in center eld, missing a
grand slam by a couple of feet but driving in
a pair. Chris Rodriguezs sacrice y drove in
Harkness for what would turn out to be
Pacica Americans last run.
Thats because Pierce came on in relief and
shut down Pacica the rest of the way. He
retired 10 of the nal 11 batters he faced, with
only one Pacica base runner reaching by
virtue of a Foster City error.
[Pierce] pitched a heck of a game, Steve
Falk said.
Harkness also did a good job in limiting the
Foster City bats. The Pacica starter allowed
one run while scattering eight hits before
being relieved by Christian Falk with two outs
in the fourth.
Foster City got to Falk in the fth, scoring
twice. Jonathan Scoeld legged out an ineld
hit and with Aspillera at the plate, moved to
second on a wild pitch. He took third on
Aspilleras single and ended up scoring on a
second wild pitch in the inning. Zach Zeijeiro
drove in the other run with a groundout and
Foster City entered its last at-bat needing two
runs to extend the game.
There would be no miracle comeback as
Foster City went quietly in the top of the
sixth. It got the tying run to the plate after
Ozawa was hit by a pitch, but Falk got a
strikeout to end the game.
After losing 11-0 in four innings (to
Pacica American), we were determined to
come back and make a game of it, Callagy
said.
SPORTS 12
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EVERY
THURSDAY
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E V EV EV E E E E V VE VVV EV EVERR RRRRRRRR RRYYYYY Y YY RRRRR RRR
S S RS RS RS RS R R U UR U HU H H T TH TT T S SS SS S S U U URR RR R T T THH H HUU U SSS S RR R HH H DD DDD DD DDD DA AA A A DDDDAA AAAAA AAA AY YY AYYY AAY AAYYY Y A AA AAAA AAAA AA
EVERY
THURSDAY
4:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Bar Only
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Pacica Americans Elijah Ricks blasts a
two-run double in the bottom of the second
inning in his teams 5-3 win over Foster City
in the District 52 9-10 championship game.
Continued from page 11
PACIFICA
Sports brief
the sideline. She knew where players were
and where they should be. She helped us see
the game better certainly very soccer
smart.
After hitting the books and staying in game
shape, the midelder rejoined the team for a
huge game at Menlo-Atherton. It was a game
Aragon needed and won 1-0.
It was actually really emotional for me,
Rodrick said of that game. I really didnt
show it on the outside but I was really excited
to be on the eld again and play with them in
a game and not just in practice.
We were denitely more potent with her,
Colglazier said, adding there was no hesita-
tion to insert Rodrick into the lineup despite
missing the years initial stages. That game
denitely got her off on the right foot. It was-
nt just the stats for us, she was able to be a
nuisance to other teams, a player they had to
deal with. That obviously took their attention
away from our other quality players.
Rodrick said she took a lot of pride in being
the distributor for Aragon and its something
she hopes to bring to the Dominican team.
Personally, my goal is to become part of
the traveling squad, she said.
Its denitely becoming more of a tradi-
tion, Colglazier said of Aragon players mov-
ing on to play at the next level. We frame
their jerseys and keep them up in the team
room so its something the young girls look
up to. I think just by raising the bar, new girls
come through there and see what the opportu-
nities are.
The Penguins open their 2012 regular sea-
son schedule on Aug. 30 at home against
Humboldt State.
Continued from page 11
DON
KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL
Aragons Nicole Rodrick will attend
Dominican University and play soccer for the
Penguins.
No deal for Magic center
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Miami Heat got two more shooters.
The Orlando Magic, at least for now, are
keeping their center.
A flurry of deals were completed
Wednesday and another one was put on hold
on the first day contracts could be signed in
the NBA.
Ray Allen and Rashard Lewis inked their
deals with the NBA champions, who will
rely on their perimeter accuracy to create
more space on the court for LeBron James
and Dwyane Wade.
The Spurs announced Tim Duncan was
staying in San Antonio and the Knicks com-
pleted a sign-and-trade to bring Marcus
Camby to New York. But theres no deal for
the best big man of them all in the NBA right
now.
The Magic cant find an agreement they
like for All-Star center Dwight Howard, who
has asked for a trade to Brooklyn. The
Magic have tried to accommodate, only to
find nothing from the Nets that fit their
desires.
Weve had discussions with Brooklyn,
weve had discussions with a host of differ-
ent teams about a host of different issues.
And the answer is, Yes
were still talking to
them, Magic general
manager Rob Hennigan
said. Were still looking
to do whatever it is that
puts us in the best posi-
tion from a sustainability
standpoint, (and) from a
strategic standpoint.
Currently as they
stand I think the parame-
ters that weve talked about are a little bit in
a stationary position. And currently as its
constructed Im not sure theres really any-
thing to discuss.
Instead, the Nets re-signed their current
center, Brook Lopez, to an extension. He
had been linked to the Howard trade talk for
months but knows he will at last begin the
season in Brooklyn, ineligible to be traded
until Jan. 15.
Free agency opened July 1 and teams were
able to begin signing players at 12:01 a.m.
EDT Wednesday. Deron Williams got a
quick start, signing his five-year, $98 million
extension with the Nets while in Las Vegas
for the U.S. Olympic teams training camp
right after the window opened.
Dwight Howard
13
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 14
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND The Golden State Warriors are getting more
for Dorell Wright after all pending some last-minute paper-
work, of course.
The Warriors have agreed to send Wright to the Philadelphia
76ers in a three-team trade that will net guard Jarrett Jack from
the New Orleans Hornets, two people familiar with the deci-
sion said Wednesday.
The people, who spoke on condition of anonymity to the
Associated Press because the trade is still being nalized, said
the Hornets will receive the 76ers draft rights to Edin Bavcic
of Bosnia and Herzegovina in a salary-slashing move that also
clears space in a crowded backcourt. Bavic is expected to
remain in Europe next season.
The original proposed trade had the Warriors receiving
Bavcic for Wright. Instead, the Hornets hopped in the mix to
acquire Bavcic and hand the Warriors the veteran guard
theyve wanted this offseason to play alongside Stephen Curry
and Klay Thompson.
The 6-foot-9 Wright is due about $4 million in the nal year
of his contract coincidentally negotiated by Warriors gener-
al manager Bob Myers, who is Wrights former agent. With so
many one-year deals, the Sixers are clearly aiming to have
plenty money available to deal in the 2013 free agent market.
Wright averaged 16.4 points and started all 82 games during
the 2010-11 season. He led the league in 3-pointers made
(194) and finished third in voting for the NBAs Most
Improved Player award behind Kevin Love and LaMarcus
Aldridge.
But his playing time slipped under rookie coach Mark
Jackson and so did his performance. Wright averaged 10.3
points and started 61 of 66 games during the lockout-shortened
season.
Jack averaged 15.6 points and 6.3 assists last season and
could challenge for the starting shooting guard spot held by
Thompson, the Warriors 11th overall pick in 2011. Jack also
gives the Warriors some depth with the often-injured Curry
recovering from his latest surgery on his right ankle.
Warriors send out Wright, bring in Jack
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Serena Williams wins
first match at Bank of the West
STANFORD Four days after capturing
the singles title at Wimbledon, fourth-ranked
and top-seeded Serena Williams beat reigning
NCAA champion Nicole Gibbs 6-2, 6-1 in the
second round of the Bank of the West on
Wednesday.
Gibbs double-faulted on her rst serve and
then seemed to regain her composure and
played a number of strong points the rest of
the way.
Williams, who credited her win at Stanford
last year as rejuvenating her career, said it
took some time to adjust to the different con-
ditions between Wimbledon grass and
California hard court.
In other matches, fifth-seeded Yanina
Wickmayer of Belgian beat Heather Watson
of Britain 5-7, 6-1, 6-4 and sixth-seeded
Chanelle Scheepers of South Africa topped
wild card Michelle Larcher De Brito of
Portugal 6-3, 6-4.
SPORTS 15
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Sports brief
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 49 34 .590
Atlanta 46 39 .541 4
New York 46 40 .535 4 1/2
Miami 41 44 .482 9
Philadelphia 37 50 .425 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 48 37 .565
Cincinnati 47 38 .553 1
St. Louis 46 40 .535 2 1/2
Milwaukee 40 45 .471 8
Chicago 33 52 .388 15
Houston 33 53 .384 15 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 47 40 .540
San Francisco 46 40 .535 1/2
Arizona 42 43 .494 4
San Diego 34 53 .391 13
Colorado 33 52 .388 13
SaturdaysGames
Washington 4, Colorado 1
Houston 6, Milwaukee 3
Pittsburgh 3, San Francisco 1
N.Y. Mets 3, Chicago Cubs 1
St. Louis 3, Miami 2
Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 3
Cincinnati 6, San Diego 5
Arizona 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
SundaysGames
Chicago Cubs 7, N.Y. Mets 0
Atlanta 4, Philadelphia 3
Colorado 4,Washington 3
Pittsburgh 13, San Francisco 2
Milwaukee 5, Houston 3, 10 innings
St. Louis 5, Miami 4
Cincinnati 4, San Diego 2
Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 1
TuesdaysGames
NL All-Stars 8, AL All-Stars 0
WednesdaysGames
No games scheduled
ThursdaysGames
No games scheduled
FridaysGames
Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 4:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 51 33 .607
Baltimore 45 40 .529 6 1/2
Tampa Bay 45 41 .523 7
Boston 43 42 .506 8 1/2
Toronto 43 43 .500 9
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 47 38 .553
Cleveland 44 41 .518 3
Detroit 44 42 .512 3 1/2
Kansas City 37 47 .440 9 1/2
Minnesota 36 48 .429 10 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 51 34 .600
Los Angeles 48 38 .558 3 1/2
Oakland 43 43 .500 8 1/2
Seattle 36 51 .414 16
SaturdaysGames
N.Y.Yankees 6, Boston 1, 1st game
Detroit 8, Kansas City 7
Chicago White Sox 2,Toronto 0
Cleveland 7,Tampa Bay 3
Texas 4, Minnesota 3, 10 innings
Boston 9, N.Y.Yankees 5, 2nd game
L.A. Angels 3, Baltimore 0
Seattle 7, Oakland 1
SundaysGames
Detroit 7, Kansas City 1
Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 6
Toronto 11, Chicago White Sox 9
L.A. Angels 6, Baltimore 0
Oakland 2, Seattle 1, 13 innings
Minnesota at Texas, late
N.Y.Yankees at Boston, late
TuesdaysGames
NL All-Stars 8, AL All-Stars 0
WednesdaysGames
No games scheduled
ThursdaysGames
No games scheduled
FridaysGames
Detroit at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City 10 5 3 33 23 17
D.C. 10 5 3 33 34 22
New York 9 5 4 31 32 27
Chicago 8 6 4 28 21 21
Houston 6 5 7 25 22 24
New England 6 7 4 22 24 22
Columbus 6 6 4 22 17 17
Montreal 6 11 3 21 27 36
Philadelphia 5 9 2 17 18 18
Toronto FC 3 11 4 13 21 35
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose 11 4 4 37 36 24
Real Salt Lake 11 6 3 36 31 21
Seattle 8 5 6 30 23 19
Vancouver 8 5 6 30 21 22
Los Angeles 7 10 2 23 28 29
Colorado 7 10 1 22 25 24
Chivas USA 5 7 5 20 11 18
Portland 5 8 4 19 16 24
FC Dallas 3 9 7 16 17 27
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturdays Games
Sporting Kansas City 0, Houston 0, tie
Real Salt Lake 3, Portland 0
FC Dallas 0, San Jose 0, tie
Chivas USA 0, Vancouver 0, tie
Seattle FC 2, Colorado 1
Sundays Games
Los Angeles 2, Chicago 0
Philadelphia 3, Toronto FC 0
New England 2, New York 0
Columbus at Montreal, late
Wednesday, July 11
Toronto FC 3, Vancouver 2
Saturday, July 14
Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Portland, 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 15
Seattle FC at New York, 4 p.m.
D.C. United at Houston, 9 p.m.
NL STANDINGS
AL STANDINGS MLS STANDINGS
@Braves
9:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/19
@WCaps
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/22
vs.Fire
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/28
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/11
@Montreal
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/18
vs.Rapids
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/25
vs.RSL
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
@Braves
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/18
vs.FCDallas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
@Twins
11:10a.m.
CSN-CAL
7/15
vs. Rangers
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
vs. Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/17
@Phillies
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/20
vs. Yankees
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/19
vs. Yankees
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/20
vs. Astros
7:15p.m.
NBC
7/13
vs.Astros
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/14
vs. Astros
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/15
@Twins
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/13
@Braves
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/17
@Twins
4:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
ATLANTAHAWKSAcquiredGAnthonyMorrow,
G Jordan Farmar, F Jordan Williams, F DeShawn
Stevenson and F Johan Petro and a 2017 second-
roundpickfromBrooklynfor GJoeJohnson.Traded
G Marvin Williams to Utah for G Devin Harris
BROOKLYNNETSRe-signed G Deron Williams
to a ve-year contract and F Gerald Wallace to a
four-year contract. Agreed to a contract extension
with C Brook Lopez. Signed F Mirza Teletovic.
CLEVELAND CAVALIERSSigned F Luke Ha-
rangody to a one-year contract.
DETROIT PISTONSSigned F Kyle Singler to a
multiyear contract.
HOUSTONROCKETSTraded G Kyle Lowery to
Toronto for F Gary Forbes and an unspecied rst-
round draft pick. Signed C Marcus Camby and
tradedhimtoNewYorkfor GToneyDouglas,CJosh
Harrellson, C Jerome Jordan and two unspecied
second-round draft picks.
LOSANGELESCLIPPERSSigned F Blake Grifn
to a ve-year contract extension. Signed F Reggie
Evans and traded him to Brooklyn for the right to
swap 2016 second-round draft picks. Signed G
Jamal Crawford.
MIAMI HEATSigned G Ray Allen and F Rashard
Lewis.
MILWAUKEEBUCKSSigned G Doron Lamb.
NEWORLEANDHORNETSTradedGJarrett Jack
to Golden State.
NEWYORKKNICKSSignedG-FJamesWhite.Re-
signed G JR Smith.
OKLAHOMA CITYTHUNDERSigned F Hollis
Thompson and C Hasheem Thabeet.
ORLANDOMAGICSignedFRyanAndersonand
traded him to New Orleans for F Gustavo Ayon.
PHILADELPHIA76ERSRe-signed F Lavoy Allen.
Acquired F Dorell Wright from Golden State. Ac-
quired C Darryl Watkins from New Orleans for the
rights to F Edin Bavcic.
PHOENIXSUNSSignedGSteveNashandtraded
him to the L.A.Lakers for 2013 and 2015 rst-round
draft picks and 2013 and 2014 second-round draft
picks. Signed G Eric Gordon to an offer sheet.
TRANSACTIONS
Singles
SecondRound
Chanelle Scheepers (6), South Africa, def. Michelle
Larcher de Brito, Portugal, 6-3, 6-4.
Yanina Wickmayer (5), Belgium, def. Heather Wat-
son, Britain, 5-7, 6-1, 6-4.
SerenaWilliams (1),UnitedStates,def.NicoleGibbs,
United States, 6-2, 6-1.
Doubles
First Round
Nathalie Grandin, South Africa, and Vladimira Uh-
lirova (3),Czech Republic,def.Mallory Burdette and
Nicole Gibbs, United States, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 10-6
tiebreak.
Quarternals
Chan Hao-ching and Chan Yung-jan (4), Taiwan,
def. Dominika Cibulkova and Janette Husarova,
Slovakia, 6-4, 6-3.
Jarmila Gajdosova, Australia, and Vania King (1),
United States, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, and
Anne Keothavong, Britain, 6-2, 6-2.
MarinaErakovic,NewZealand,andHeatherWatson,
Britain, def. Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears
(2), United States, 7-6 (9), 2-6, 10-4 tiebreak.
STANFORD RESULTS
SEMIFINALS
Wednesday, July11
Sporting Kansas City (MLS) 2, Philadelphia Union
(MLS) 0
ChivasUSA(MLS) vs.SeattleSounders(MLS) atTuk-
wila,Wash., 10 p.m.
CHAMPIONSHIP
Tuesday, Aug. 7 or Wednesday, Aug. 8
Chivas USA (MLS) or Seattle Sounders (MLS) at
Sporting Kansas City (MLS),TBA
U.S. OPEN CUP
16
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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In the press release, Cal His Mark Tennis
summed up Mittys domination: Regarded
as perhaps the best school for girls sports in
the nation.
Palo Alto picked up a Special Mention
by Cal Hi Sports. The Spartans featured
three of the top athletes in the state in volley-
ball player Melanie Wade, baseball player
B.J. Boyd who also starred on the Palo
Alto football team and swimmer Jane
Trosky, who not only dominated CCS, but
appeared in the U.S. Olympic Swim Trials.
***
Turns out San Francisco Giants fans were
right when it came to the all-star voting,
much to the chagrin of the rest of the nation.
After a week of true baseball fans and
media griping about how San Francisco fans
stuffed the ballot to get Melky Cabrera,
Pablo Sandoval and Buster Posey into the
starting lineup, the Giants representatives
stole the show in Tuesdays All-Star Game.
The trio combined to go 3 for 6 from the
plate, with ve RBIs, four runs scored, a
homer, a triple, a walk and zero strike-
outs.
Matt Cain went to the mound and made
National League manager Tony LaRussa
look like a genius, pitching two scoreless
innings of one-hit ball with a strikeout as the
Senior Circuit cruised to an 8-0 win over the
American League all-stars.
The only real question of the night was:
who should be MVP, Sandoval or Cabrera?
Sandoval laced a bases-loaded triple to
break the game wide open in the top of the
rst as the National League blasted Detroits
Justin Verlander he of the 101 mph fast-
ball.
Compare that to Cabrera, who started the
rst-inning rally with a one-out single, fol-
lowed by a two-run bomb in the top of the
fourth for the nal runs of the game.
Personally, I would have voted Sandoval
for the honor. His hit was more monumental
in the given situation and, in a game that
usually has very little in the way of drama,
there is nothing more dramatic than watching
a lumbering Sandoval hustle into a three-run
triple.
But I have no problem with Cabrera get-
ting the award. He had a breakout season in
Kansas City last year, site of all-star festivi-
ties, and is proving last year was not a uke
by continuing to be one of the best hitters in
baseball.
In the end, I believe sentiment coupled
with performance carried the day for
Cabrera.
***
A tip of the cap to Oakland Athletics all-
star selection Ryan Cook.
Hes the rookie who came to the As organ-
ization in the deal with Arizona that saw the
As send Trevor Cahill to the Diamondbacks
for heralded prospect Jarrod Parker.
Cook is not having a bad season himself
and Tuesday he proved he belongs in the
majors. Taking the mound in relief in the top
of the seventh, he pitched one inning, strik-
ing out a pair rookie phenom Bryce
Harper from the Washington Nationals and
Mets third baseman David Wright.
Both looking.
***
Stanford announced the mens basketball
team will tip off the 2012-13 season opener
against University of San Francisco at Oracle
Arena. It is the rst time the two teams have
met since the Cardinal defeated the Dons 71-
56 at Maples Pavilion in November 2005.
This will be the 65th meeting between the
two schools, with Stanford holding the series
lead, 44-21.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
some point. Were going to need your arm
and tonight he stood up, Sutter said of
Monozon. Sixty pitches in six innings
against that team? Thats huge. Hes pitched a
bunch of big games for us. His season as it
were, has been up and down. Hes had a little
trouble mechanically getting him dialed to
where hes throwing downhill.
Monozon didnt look like a pitcher whos
struggled at times. In fact, the game started
with all the makings of a pitchers duel as
Hillsborough starter Justin Moore mowed
down Foster City in the rst, striking out the
side but using 27 pitches to do so.
Monozon came out in the rst and, after
surrendering a double to Henry James, got a
little help from his defense with a 4-3-5 dou-
ble play. The twin-killing was a sign of things
to come. The bottom of second ended in dou-
ble play fashion as well on a great catch in
right eld and subsequent throw to rst.
The Foster City bats awoke in the third.
Parker ORegan led off with a single and
Chris Fung followed with the rst of two huge
hits for the black and teal an opposite eld
double to left eld that set his team up with
two runners on with no one out.
Hes been doing that the whole tourna-
ment, Sutter said of Fung. Wherever the
pitch is thrown, he hits it.
Tommy Ghiroso drove in the rst run of the
game on a smash to shortstop and Kevin
Jacobs cashed in another run on a sacrice y
to right to make it 2-0.
Monozon made the lead stick in the third,
getting out of a potential two-run
Hillsborough on a pretty defensive play,
throwing from his knees to gun down a swing-
ing bunt attempt.
The former champs nally broke through in
the fourth after Moore stroked a one-out dou-
ble to left. He came around to score on a Trace
Tamarro elders choice to make it 2-1.
But with Hillsborough hanging on to this
new found momentum, it was Foster City who
quickly seized it right back. Ghiroso led the
bottom half of the fourth off with a home run
to left center eld to regain the two-run
advantage.
That two-run lead made [Hillsborough]
change their perspective, Sutter said,
because now they need two so theyre going
up there to swing for home runs [in the latter
innings]. It was huge.
With his offense staking him to that two-run
advantage, Monozon pitched brilliantly the
rest of the way, steering the long-awaiting
championship cruiser to Foster City shores.
I felt good, Monozon said. I got a little
wild at times, but I just made a few adjust-
ments and settled myself down. I wasnt hit-
ting my spots, so I had to nish down more
and just get a little more velocity on the ball.
My defense was great. They came up with I
needed them.
Leading the defensive charge to end the
game was ORegan, who made two great
plays at shortstop to top the championship
sundae with the proverbial cherry. With a run-
ner on, James smacked a ball up the middle
that ORegan snagged and ipped to second
for the pretty force out. Then, Moore lined a
ball to short that ORegan caught on the y
then threw to rst to get a wandering James
for the nal out.
Continued from page 11
CHAMPS
Voeckler wins Tours 10th stage
Sports brief
Sharks re-sign
defenseman Marc-Edouard Vlasic
SAN JOSE The San Jose Sharks have
signed defenseman Marc-Edouard Vlasic to a
ve-year contract extension through the 2017-
18 season.
Sharks general manager Doug Wilson says
Wednesday that the team extended Vlasic
because he can play in all situations and has
blossomed into a very trusted player on both
sides of the puck. He said the Sharks are
lucky to have him on our team for the next six
seasons.
The 25-year-old Vlasic led the Sharks with
171 blocked shots last season.
THE ASSOCIATED PRES
BELLEGARDE- SUR- VALSERI NE,
France Thomas Voeckler nearly opted out
of the Tour de France weeks ago because of an
injured knee. Two days before the start, he
was pained even more over allegations of dop-
ing by his French team.
On Wednesday, the crowd-pleasing
Frenchman gave his response by winning
the 10th stage.
An in-your-face, trash-talking atmosphere
dominated as riders entered the Alps on
Wednesday with Bradley Wiggins retaining
the yellow jersey by squashing attacks by
rivals one of whom complained that the
Briton wasnt being respectful.
The mood was decidedly sour before the
120.9-mile ride began along three hard
climbs, after Tuesdays rest day was marred
by an arrest by French police of a Codis team
rider over a Marseille doping probe.
Doping cases past and present have cast a
shadow over this Tour.
Voeckler, too, was burdened by the issue of
doping. Two days before the Tour start, a
French newspaper brought to light a previous-
ly unknown probe of his Europcar team on
allegations of improper use of a controlled
corticoid by its riders during last years Tour
a claim the team vigorously denies.
Some fans in Belgium, where the Tour start-
ed on June 30, booed Europcar riders follow-
ing the news.
Voecklers victory was really special
because we had criticism before the Tour,
because it really hurt me, he said. His victo-
ry is a part of my answer not my revenge
an answer to the critics.
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
COIT
By Melissa Kossler Dutton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tamara Schenke could use some help
enforcing city codes requiring the residents of
Belton, Mo., to maintain the appearance of
their property.
So the code enforcement ofcer recently
asked residents to volunteer to help her look
for properties with overgrown grass, junk or
debris on the lawn or signs of illegal home
occupation. Shes optimistic that residents
will volunteer for the new program, which
includes extensive training, because theyve
helped with smaller efforts in the past.
They jump on it, she said. They want to
see their neighborhood cleaned up.
She needs the extra sets of eyes because the
city laid off the other code enforcement ofcer
and the departments secretary a few years
ago. The cutbacks came at a time when fore-
closures and vacant homes were on the rise,
which created additional work for her and
code enforcement departments around the
country.
Schenke now handles about 2,500 code
enforcement cases each year. She hopes to
train 30 to 40 volunteers to assist her.
Cities around the country are turning to vol-
unteers for the same reasons as Schenke, said
Roy Fyffe, executive director of the American
Association of Code Enforcement.
The budget problems that jurisdictions are
facing have had a major impact on looking to
our citizens to help, he said from his ofce in
Tow, Texas.
When state budget cuts prevented the city of
Eastvale, Calif., from adding paid staff,
Michael Ozzie Osborn answered the call for
volunteers. Once hes trained, he said, he will
patrol the city looking for violations such as
boats parked in driveways, garbage cans left at
the curb or other eyesores.
Its important that the citizens of the city of
Eastvale abide by our municipal code, said
the retired engineer.
Concern for the communitys appearance
also led Steve Crull to enlist in Schenkes new
program. The Belton resident was already part
of a smaller program where residents with
professional training in code enforcement
could report violations.
Having worked as a building codes inspec-
tor, I knew that dCouring these times of budg-
et cuts one inspector was going to have a
rough time covering the whole city on a regu-
lar basis, Crull said. I believe that everyone
should take an interest in their surrounding
community. If for no other reason than derelict
properties and structures lower property val-
ues. But also a volunteer can observe the com-
ings and goings in the neighborhood and
report any more serious crimes.
Schenke hopes to have her program up and
running by the end of summer. The city has
already created a policy that protects the vol-
unteers while they perform their duties, she
said. She also has made provisions to prevent
volunteers from misusing their position; shell
make spot checks of the violations they report
to make sure they are legitimate, she said.
Before embarking on a volunteer program,
cities need to address liability issues, create a
training program and determine whether the
use of volunteers violates any labor contracts,
Fyffe said. (The issues) are going to vary
from state to state and community to commu-
nity, he said.
In Daytona Beach, Fla., volunteers recently
nished 20 hours of classroom training and
have begun to do ride-alongs with the profes-
sional code enforcement ofcers, said Hector
Garcia, head of code. The volunteers are look-
ing for inappropriate signs along the roadway,
unaddressed vandalism to houses and untend-
ed lawns.
Its not to replace my code ofcers, Garcia
said. Its just a helping hand.
Program participants will be assigned to
patrol neighborhoods other than their own, so
Enforcers of housing codes seek volunteer help
See CODE, Page 18
Cities around the country are asking residents to volunteer to help look for properties with
overgrown grass, junk or debris on the lawn or signs of illegal home occupation.
18
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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they are not in the position of reporting on
their neighbors, he said. And the volunteers
are not to interact with other residents or busi-
ness owners anyhow during the course of their
work, he said. All contact with the public is to
be made through the department.
Many of the programs allow volunteers only
to observe violations and report back to paid
staff, added Donna Wisniewski, president of
the American Association of Code
Enforcement and a code officer with the
Seminole County Sheriffs Ofce in Florida,
which does not use volunteers for code matters.
Volunteers can check properties to see if
owners have mowed their grass, removed
trash or inated the tires on parked vehicles,
she said. They also can be on the lookout for
possible violations while they are out and
about in their neighborhoods, she said.
Were not able to get out in every neighbor-
hood every day, she said.
Volunteers typically like the work because
they can make a tangible difference in the
community, Wisniewski said.
They can say, I turned that over to code
enforcement and it got taken care of, she
said.
Continued from page 17
CODE
law and practice guiding student enrollment
tends to favor the continuing student, based
solely on accrual of course units.
Locally, the San Mateo County Community
College District already has many of the
requested changes in place. The challenge will
be shifting money around to continue services
as funding continues to slip, said Jennifer
Hughes, vice president of student services at
the College of San Mateo.
Hughes said many colleges, including those
in San Mateo County, already offer priority
enrollment as well as many of the additional
services being proposed. Should the proposal
be approved, and Hughes believes it will be,
the district will have two years to work out
any needed changes.
The proposal would give priority for new
students who have completed college orienta-
tion, assessment and developed education
plans as well as continuing students in good
academic standing who have not exceeded
100 units, not including units in basic English,
math or English as a Second Language.
In addition, active-duty military and veter-
ans and former foster youth in good academic
standing who have completed orientation,
assessment and education plans will continue
to have rst call on courses, followed by stu-
dents in extended opportunity programs and
services and disabled students programs and
services who have done the same.
With statewide budget cuts, changes are
being suggested since the focus for school
offerings has shifted to meeting academic and
training needs instead of offering opportuni-
ties for others to enrich their education. The
San Mateo County Community College
District, for example, previously set priorities
to focus funds for classes helping students
earn a degree rather than explore an interest. It
also canceled courses with low enrollment as
funds have been cut decisions district of-
cials have said allow for the focus to remain
on students attempting to earn a degree or job
training.
Another change could impact lifelong
learners. A rule that could go into effect in the
fall 2013 would prevent students from repeat-
ing a course that they have already completed
and earned a passing grade. Some classes
like performing arts and physical education
could be repeated as many as four times.
Committees are already in place to deal
with the changes needed to make any needed
changes, said Hughes. The difculty will con-
tinue to be funding the services. District of-
cials will need to continue to be creative when
it comes to meeting needs while cuts contin-
ue, she said.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
DEGREES
dancing or tables and chairs. The city esti-
mates having 1,200 to 1,500 people based on
attendance at the existing summer concerts
and also expects uses including movies in the
park, childrens theater performances and
smaller gigs like puppet and magic shows.
The park already has basketball courts but
the foundation wants to add a colorful overlay
along with new backboards.
The design also includes two standard-size
bocce ball courts with a storage shack and
shaded seating.
One way to raise the green for the upgrades
is the second annual Symphony at Sunset to
be held Burton Park Saturday, July 21. The
event, which costs $50 for an individual tick-
et, will feature orchestral music performed by
the St. Peters Chamber Orchestra and culi-
nary delicacies provided by local venues and
wine available for purchase.
Burton Park is the oldest of the citys
developed parks, heavily used year-round for
a wide range of activities and housing both
the citys teen center and Kiwanis Recreation
Center. There are also horseshoe pits, a base-
ball diamond, tennis courts and walking
path.
In 2008, the park received its first facelift.
The star of that $850,000 undertaking was
the first fully inclusive playground in San
Mateo County compliant with the
Americans with Disabilities Act with ramp
access, a rubbery safety surface and perime-
ter fencing which is good for children who
run outside of boundaries like those with
autism. The city celebrated this phase with
an Oct. 23, 2008 ribbon cutting, marking
the end of a two-year process.
Symphony at Sunset will be held 6:15 p.m.
Saturday, July 21. Music will begin at 7:15
p.m. Tickets start at $50 and are available
online at www.prfsancarlos.org/symphony/.
Tables for four and eight are also available.
For more information about the effort or nam-
ing opportunities visit www.prfsancarlos.org.
Continued from page 1
PARK
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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I
ts a frustrating fact for all but the luck-
iest gardener: Your luscious vegetable
garden, freshly potted ower boxes and
newly laid sod are irresistible to furry pests
who live in your neighborhood. Raccoons
rip apart your lawn looking for grubs.
Gophers nosh on the roots of ornamental
plants as they tunnel along underground.
Squirrels take big bites of perfectly ripe
apricots and then audaciously toss the half-
eaten fruit on the ground.
How to thwart these unwelcome visitors?
The UC Davis Agriculture and Natural
Resources (ANR) Division, home to the
statewide Master Gardener program, offers
the public detailed information on the best
ways to manage various vertebrate pests
through its Pest Notes, which are avail-
able online. (See the entire list of available
Pest Notes at
https://ucanr.org/freepubs/freepubsub.cfm?c
at=6).
Here are some general guidelines for ban-
ishing masked bandits and other unwelcome
visitors to the garden:
An ounce of prevention
The first step isnt to reach for poison or
a pellet gun but instead to make your yard
and garden inhospitable to pests.
Admittedly, with some critters gophers
and moles, for example there isnt a lot
you can do to bar access to your landscape
once they have moved in. Still, try preven-
tion first. With raccoons, this means not
leaving pet food outside, installing a spark
cover over the top of the chimney (raccoons
like to build dens in chimneys) and using
garbage cans with tight-fitting lids. It also
helps to tie the cans to a post or build a rack
in which they can be placed, so that rac-
coons cant knock them over.
Raccoons scoff at fences, but youll get
their attention if you electrify the fence. Its
important to do this properly, of course, and
to post warning signs on the fence.
Prevention techniques for dealing with
gophers include installing underground
fencing using hardware cloth or poultry
wire (Check the Pest Note on gophers for
details on how to do this).
What about repellents?
No doubt youve heard people say you
can ward off pests using pretty unorthodox
methods: scattering mothballs around the
perimeter of the garden; or installing
devices that move, make noise, flash lights
or spray water.
Some gardeners swear such techniques
work. Unfortunately there is no solid evi-
dence that any of these tricks are effective
or effective for more than a few days, at
which point smart pests learn that they can
safely ignore the whirling and flashing and
stink of mothballs, and continue treating
your lawn and garden as all-you-can-eat buf-
fets.
Using traps and poison
If you have done everything to keep pests
away, and the damage they are causing is
unbearable, you can kill them using traps or
poison.
What you cannot do is trap them and then
release them in another area unless you
have written permission from the California
Fish and Game
Department.
You can
trap
and
kill raccoons, but this is something best han-
dled by a professional wildlife control person
(Raccoons are strong and can be vicious
when cornered). State law prohibits poison-
ing raccoons.
There are traps and toxic baits for use on
gophers.
There are different rules for eliminating
ground squirrels and tree squirrels. Most
species of ground squirrels can be killed any
time of year using any legal manner. Most
species of tree squirrels can only be killed
during hunting season (The exception is the
red fox tree squirrel, which can be taken at
any time by any legal manner). Check the
Pest Notes for more information.
Whatever method you choose, please
make sure you follow the proper proce-
dures, especially when using poison. The
Pest Notes do a great job of explaining
exactly what you need to do to safely
and effectively use traps and
baits.
Learn how to deal with rac-
coons, gophers, squirrels, deer,
rats and mice by reading the UC
Davis ANR Pest Notes on each.
They are online at
https://ucanr.org/freepubs/freep-
ubsub.cfm?cat=6
Joan Tharp is a University of
California Cooperative Extension
Master Gardener. She lives in San
Mateo. She can be reached at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Banishing raccoons and other unwelcome garden visitors
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DATEBOOK 20
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
virus that expedited the districts expan-
sion and review to allow a funding source
through an assessment. Now, there are pro-
grams and a stable revenue source so the
county would not be burdened by taking it
back.
Theres no way to really say the 21-
member board is responsible for its suc-
cess any more than a ve-member Board
of Supervisors. The funding stream is what
makes it successful, Poyatos said.
Cities are also jumping into the fray on
both ends. The San Bruno City Council
this week voted to send LAFCo a letter
supporting the district. The San Carlos
City Council sent a letter endorsing the
dissolution recommendation. Its district
board member originally brought the
alleged embezzlement to light. Assistant
City Manager Brian Moura said the city
has also received several requests from
other cities for the background information
it compiled before then-mayor Andy Klein
asked the San Mateo County Civil Grand
Jury to investigate. The civil grand jury did
not take up the issue because its docket
was full.
District Manager Bob Gay has asked
San Carlos leaders for a sit-down some-
time before the LAFCo meeting in hopes
of reconsideration.
LAFCo also received letters opposing
dissolution from ve San Bruno residents.
The LAFCo report up for discussion at
the July 18 meeting concluded that the dis-
trict effectively controls mosquitoes and
other vermin but its boards size and meth-
ods of appointment constrain accounta-
bility, visibility and responsiveness to the
public. The county could provide the dis-
tricts services much as it does other envi-
ronmental health programs because it is
already structured to deliver segregated
services like restaurant inspection and
water quality monitoring, according to the
report.
The county once handled rodent respon-
sibilities but transferred them to the district
in 2008 and shifted all vector control three
years later.
But district ofcials say mosquito and
vector control duties would get lost in the
countys large Health System, becoming
one of several areas all competing for
funding and attention. The districts
approximately $6 million annual budget
would be 1/2,000th of the countys gener-
al fund budget and be at risk for the chop-
ping block, Cassman and the district con-
tend.
District ofcials also point out that it is
only one of several incidents of embezzle-
ment or fraud by public employees in the
Bay Area and San Mateo County in partic-
ular.
For instance, the former head of the
Half Moon Bay Police Officers
Association is charged with embezzling
$5,700 in 2008, two former county pub-
lic administrators were charged in feder-
al court last month with stealing from the
estates they oversaw, a former Portola
Valley Elementary School District super-
intendent is charged with embezzle-
ments, theft was alleged at the Mid-
Peninsula Water District and two San
Mateo County Transit District mechanics
are charged with stealing fare money.
In the mosquito districts case, between
2009 and 2011, former nance director
Joanne Seeney, worked for the district
under the name Jo Ann Dearman.
Prosecutors who eventually led charges
say she and accounting assistant Vika
Sinipata embezzled at least $650,000 by
giving themselves extra pay at a higher
rate and fraudulent time off, excessively
contributed to their deferred compensation
funds, used credit cards for personal pur-
chases and electronically transferred
money into their own accounts. The
alleged embezzlement came to light last
year when a district board member from
San Carlos questioned expenses in the dis-
tricts pesticide account. At the time of
Seeneys employment, she had been pros-
ecuted in two different embezzlement
cases and served time for one while on
medical leave from the district.
Gay had not conducted either a criminal
nor reference check on Seeney before her
hiring. After the alleged embezzlement
came to light, the board put Gay on an
employee improvement plan. The board
also extended his contract.
The district has since hired Orange
County internal auditor Dr. Peter Hughes
to comb through its nancial controls and
he is expected to attend the upcoming
LAFCo meeting to detail the implemented
changes.
The district has also created an assistant
manager position to oversee two nancial
staff members and requires criminal
checks of prospective employees.
LAFCo meets 2:30 p.m. Wednesday,
July 18 in Board Chambers, 400 County
Government Center, Redwood City.
Continued from page 1
LAFCO
THURSDAY, JULY 12
Flight Gear: Pilot Equipment from
the Open-Cockpit Era. 10 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. SFO Museum, located in San
Francisco International Airport, San
Francisco. Features more than 40
examples of flight suits, jackets,
helmets, goggles and other
accessories dating from the 1910s to
the 1940s. Photographs, advertising
and catalogue illustrations from the
period accompany these artifacts.
Open Sundays through Fridays until
Aug. 1. For more information visit
ysfo.com/museum.
Troopathon Fundraiser. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Ageless Beauty Spas, Atria Senior
Living, 250 Myrtle Road, Burlingame.
Move America Forward is the nations
largest pro-troop organization and is
hosting a live fundraiser to send care
packages to American troops
deployed in war zones overseas.
There will be haircuts, gift certicates
and a rafe. Free admission. For more
information call (415) 259-6696.
Veterans Services and Benefits
Lecture. Noon. San Mateo County
Law Library, 710 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. The California
Department of Veterans Affairs assists
veterans and their dependents in
obtaining benefits through the
process of application and
representation of claims. Free. For
more information call 363-4913 or
visit smcll.org.
Burlingame Lions Club Free Lunch.
Noon. 990 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. For more information call
245-2993.
The American Red Cross Northern
California Region Mobile Blood
Drive. Noon to 6 p.m. The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 975
Sneath Lane, San Bruno. The Red
Cross recommends scheduling an
appointment to donate blood. Open
to the public. The sponsor code is
INTERFAITHCOMMUNITY. Free. For
more information visit
redcrossblood.org.
RPEA Meeting. 10:30 a.m. San Mateo
Elks Lodge. 229 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo. Guest speaker author JoAnn
Semones will discuss her new book
Sea of Troubles. Lunch will be served
following the discussion. $14. For
reservations and more information
call 207-6401.
Movies for School-Age Children:
Where the Wild Things Are. 3:30
p.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Come see the
Warner Brothers movie Where the
Wild Things Are on the big screen.
The movie is rated PG and lasts 101
minutes. Free popcorn as available
before the movie from Whole Foods.
Free. For more information call 522-
7838.
Hot Harvest Nights Farmers
Market. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. 700 block of
Laurel Street, San Carlos. Shop for
organic produce, specialty foods,
flowers, fish, fowl and more. Musical
entertainment in the Laurel Street
Park. Stores open late. Free. For more
information visit
sancarloschamber.org.
Central Park Music Series. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Central Park, downtown San
Mateo, corner of Fifth Avenue and El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Enjoy 80s
music by Rebel Yell. Free. For more
information call 522-7522 ext. 2767.
An Evening with the Northern
California Writers Club. 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. The Northern
California Writers Club will read from
Fault Zone: Words from the Edge.
Enjoy great stories from Bay Area
writers, get books signed and have
fun. Books will be available for
purchase. For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Myofacial Active Release
Technique Presentation. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Mills Health Center, 100 S. San
Mateo Drive, Garden Room, San
Mateo. Free. Dade Donovan, DC is a
Chiropractor in San Mateo who will
present a talk on the myofacial relief
technique called the Active Release
Technique (ART). Free. To RSVP call
696-4562 and for more information
contact Laura E. Wood at
efewilliam@yahoo.com.
Homebrewing with Emma
Christensen. 7 p.m. San Bruno
Library, Community Room, 701 Angus
Ave. West, San Bruno. This 90-minute
workshop covers the basics of
brewing beer at home, including an
overview of the necessary
equipment, ingredients for brewing
and a slide show walk-through of the
homebrewing process. Free. For more
information call 616-7084.
Thursday Group Series Dance
Class. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. International Standard
Level Two Class learning Tango from
7 p.m. to 8 p.m. All-level Bachata class
from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. International
Standard Level One Class learning
Tango 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. All-level Salsa
class 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. For more
information call 627-4854.
Movies on the Square: That Thing
You Do. 8:45 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. This movie is rated PG. Free. For
more information call 780-7340 or
visit
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/
movies.html.
FRIDAY, JULY 13
Using Video Marketing and
Pintrest for your business.
Bayshore Corporate Center, 1710 S.
Amphlett Blvd., Suite 216, San Mateo.
Register by calling 548-9597.
Teens Program. 3:30 p.m. to 4:30
p.m. South San Francisco Main
Library. 840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. Free. For more information
call 829-3860.
Art on the Square. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Bella Donna, Tribute
to Fleetwood Mac and Stevie Nicks
will be performing. Free. For more
information call 780-7340 or visit
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/
movies.html.
FBO Ballroom Dance Class. 7 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom,
551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster
City. For Beginners Only Group Series
Class learning East Coast Swing Two.
For more information call 627-4854.
The Daily Entwine: Musings and
Meditations on Earth Painting,
Collage, and Cyanotypw by Carrie
Lederer reception. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Sanchez Art Center, 1220 Linda Mar
Blvd., Pacifica. For more information
call 355-1894.
Salsa DanceParty. 7:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
Beginning Salsa lesson with Wayne
from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Intermediate Salsa lesson with Wayne
from 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monthly
Salsa Dance Party with DJ Willie
Martinez from 9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. $12
for one or both lessons and dance
party. $10 for dance only after 9:30
p.m. For more information call 627-
4854.
Summer Stanford Symphony
Orchestra. 8 p.m. Dinkelspiel
Auditorium, Stanford University. $5
to $10. For more information call 723-
3811.
SATURDAY, JULY 14
Bike 4 Breath fundraising bikeride.
7 a.m. (time varies depending on
race). Life Technologies, 4000 E. Third
Ave., Foster City. Hundreds of
participants will ride to promote lung
health and clean air policy in the Bay
Area. $25 for kids under age 18 for 10
miles. For more information call 994-
5868 or visit ggphp.org.
The American Red Cross Northern
California Region Mobile Blood
Drive. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. St. Raymond
Parish, 1100 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo
Park. The Red Cross recommends
scheduling an appointment to
donate blood. Open to the public.The
sponsor code is
INTERFAITHCOMMUNITY. Free. For
more information visit
redcrossblood.org.
Blessing of the Animals. 10 a.m.
Benthany Presbyterian Church, 2400
Rosewood Drive, San Bruno. All
animals welcome. Wonder Dog
Rescue, a small dog rescue
organization, will have dogs on site
for adoption. Please bring unopened
dog or cat food for donation. Free. For
more information call 589-5303.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
on legal charges or expelled from local dis-
tricts? While the report acknowledged
those working in court and community
schools have signicant challenges, the
report also noted the programs could be
improved upon. Increasing success can be
achieved through consolidating three cam-
puses, creating a method for tracking stu-
dent success and considering entering an
accreditation process, according to the
reports recommendations.
We appreciate the time and energy the
grand jury has invested in learning about
our court and community schools pro-
gram. We believe these recommendations
validate our ongoing work and will
increase community awareness regarding
the unique and complex needs of this par-
ticular group of students, County
Superintendent Anne Campbell wrote in a
press release.
The San Mateo County Ofce of
Education is responsible for educating
juveniles detained at the Youth Services
Center for criminal offenses, as well as stu-
dents expelled from school districts within
the county. That includes three community
schools located in South San Francisco,
San Mateo and Redwood City. Two of the
schools employ one teacher and one
instructional aide each while the third, on
Tower Road in San Mateo, has four teach-
ers and three instructional aides. In total,
about 290 students are served at any given
time but about 1,500 students are served
throughout the school year due to the tran-
sient nature of students in these circum-
stances, according to the report.
Consolidating services and offering bus
services from the other two schools to the
centralized area could allow for better
service to students, according to the report.
In addition, the report suggested creating a
method of gauging success by tracking
student credits earned or successful com-
pletion of the General Education
Development test.
Joan Rosas, associate superintendent of
student services for the County Ofce of
Education, said the county plans to open
one consolidated campus in the fall.
Previously, the campuses were often
linked to Boys and Girls Club locations
which offered a number of benets for
after-school programs. However, it made
nding qualied teachers difcult. In the
fall, a newly revamped, centralized pro-
gram will open with a more traditional
high school setting in which students will
go from class to class. Specialized needs of
students will continue to be met, she said.
High turnover and a range of student
needs create a challenge in terms of nd-
ing qualied teachers. The report found 20
percent of teachers in the community
schools would be considered highly qual-
ied during the 2010-11 school year. The
County Ofce of Education said that has
risen to 50 percent in the most recent
school year and is expected to increase to
80 percent in the 2012-13 school year.
Following student success has been a
challenge because of the high student
turnover.
The court and community schools staff
is working to create an internal database to
augment existing data management sys-
tems, according to a press release.
In the coming year, the county will
begin to collect more data such as how
many units a student earns and what books
are read while in a county-run school.
Lastly, the county will track where a stu-
dent goes after leaving back to his or
her home district, completing a GED or
possibly entering college, said Rosas.
The schools are currently not accredited
and the county is preparing work to start
that process. Accreditation, Rosas said,
will give students an option to go directly
to a four-year college after graduation.
Students currently have the option to
attend a community college before attend-
ing a four-year college.
To read the full report visit www.sanma-
teocourt.org/grandjury.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOLS
THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If youre smart, you
wont gamble with friends, even for insignifcant
stakes. Theres a chance that a big misunderstanding
could arise over something rather petty.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Devote your time and atten-
tion to situations that could make or save you money.
Time and attention devoted to these factors will yield
large profts down the line.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Provided you dont tip
your hand prematurely, a signifcant objective can be
achieved. Remember the competitors lurking in the
wings who would love to know your plans.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Give no credence to
advice offered you by someone whom you know
doesnt have an accurate handle on what youre do-
ing. This individuals intentions may be good, but his
or her counsel isnt.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- When it comes to a
partnership arrangement, let your cohort do all the
talking. There is a strong chance your two cents
worth could be the wrong thing at the wrong time.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- The possibilities
for achieving your ambitions and objectives look
pretty good, even though you might have to contend
with some petty frustrations on your road to victory.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Although youre
likely to be painfully aware of the faws in others,
itll serve no useful purpose to call attention to them.
Instead, work on your own shortcomings.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You might fnd it nec-
essary to make a small concession in a commercial
matter in order to reap some larger gains. Youll
understand that nothing is ever optimal.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If the work youre
doing requires extreme diligence, have another
double-check your efforts, especially details that
have to be put in writing. You could easily miss a
small oversight.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Dont settle for sticker
price when youre out shopping for something that is
more money than you want to pay. With a little pok-
ing around, youll fnd a good substitute at a much
lower price.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- When conversing with
friends, avoid discussing subjects that are much
too personal to share with everybody. Focus on fun
things that allow everyone to relax.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- One of your greatest
obstacles is allowing self-defeating thoughts to
overwhelm your thinking. You can control anything
you set your mind to, and that includes avoiding all
things negative.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
7-12-12
wEDNESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Vast chasm
6 Generously
11 Natural well
12 Removed the tangles
13 Tempest in a --
14 Raises
15 Viper
16 Smelting waste
17 Plug away
19 Two fves for -- --
23 Yuck!
26 Stir to action
28 Mr. Milland
29 Put oil on
31 Draws close
33 Urgent
34 Give a hard time
35 Bear --
36 First-magnitude star
39 Retiring
40 Flower holder
42 Trappist, e.g.
44 Arizona city
46 Keep in stitches
51 Seldom
54 Lopped off branches
55 Items in squirrels hoard
56 Overdoes a role
57 High-IQ group
58 Church law
DOwN
1 Imitated
2 Actor -- Pitt
3 Omigosh!
4 Ponys comment
5 Barracks off.
6 Ibsen heroine
7 Greek alphabet ender
8 U.K. network
9 Give the go-ahead
10 Fabric meas.
11 RR terminal
12 Yo-Yo Ma plays it
16 Polite word
18 Choose
20 Rubbish
21 Bright and --
22 Big Board letters
23 Rough, as a diamond
24 Chisel
25 Web-search result
27 Forensic science tool
29 Contented murmurs
30 Reno loc.
32 Hairpin curve
34 Leias rescuer
37 Tube trophies
38 -- -- step further
41 Mike of Waynes World
43 Cause-and-effect law
45 Arm bone
47 Physics particle
48 Golden Rule word
49 Watched
50 Sullivan and Murrow
51 Leader of the fock
52 Expert
53 Prez after Jimmy
54 Chest muscle, for short
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Thursday July 12, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
FOSTER CITY
ROUTE
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required. Must have
valid license and appropriate insurance coverage
to provide this service in order to be eligible.
Papers are available for pickup in San Mateo at
3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
TUTORING
Credential Teacher
Resume Available
Pre-K to College
Multiple Subjects
Contact Elizabeth
opendoortutoring@yahoo.com
110 Employment
CLEANERS - We are looking for House
Cleaners/Laundry personnel in the Bur-
lingame area. Please call Bao @
(209)471-7348.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
JEWELRY SALES
Entry up to $13 Dia up to $20
650-367-6500 FX:650-367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
SONY COMPUTER Entertainment
America is responsible for producing and
marketing Sonys signature PlayStation
family of interactive computer entertain-
ment products in the U.S., Canadian and
Latin American markets. We have open-
ings in our Foster City office for a Sr.
Software Engineer. Please mail resume
to: Sony Computer, att: KB, 919 E. Hill-
sdale Blvd., 2nd Floor, Foster City, CA
94404. No calls or emails pls.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING COOKS & BUSBOYS -
FT & PT, Good pay (B.O.E.). Apply in
person @ Neals Coffee Shop, 1845 El
Camino Real, Burlingame,
(650)692-4281
PLUMBER - Experienced needed, serv-
ice & repair, repipe & remodels. RE-
quired to have minimum 5 years experi-
ence. Fax resume to Attention Angie,
(650)595-2639.
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line, Night / Weekends.
Apply in person,1201 San Carlos Ave.,
San Carlos.
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
VISUAL DEVELOPMENT Artist (Job
Code IL12). Job available in Redwood
City, CA. Conceptualize storylines and
develop the look of the film, characters
and environment. Submit reel with appli-
cation to Pacific Data Images, Inc., Attn:
Recruiting, 1000 Flower St., Glendale,
CA 91201. (MUST REFERENCE JOB
CODE NUMBER)
YOURE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514510
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Joseph Isaac Mejia
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Joseph Isaac Mejia filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: Joseph Isaac Mejia, aka
Jose Isaac Mejia
Proposed name: Joseph Isaac Mejia
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 3,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/18/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/15/2012
(Published, 06/21/12, 06/28/12,
07/05/12, 07/12/12)
CASE# CIV 514530
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Michael Kuo
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Michael Kuo filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Michael Kuo
Proposed name: Michael Douglas Ment-
zer
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 2,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/18/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/15/2012
(Published, 06/21/12, 06/28/12,
07/05/12, 07/12/12)
23 Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF ELECTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV-
EN that a General Munici-
pal Election will be held in
the City of Half Moon Bay
on Tuesday, November 6,
2012 for the following:
2 Members of the City
Council Full Term of Four
Years
If no one or only one person
is nominated for an elective
office, appointment to the
elective office may be made
as prescribed by Section
10229, Elections Code of
the State of California.
At the November 6, 2012
Election the following local
ballot measure will also be
considered:
TO PROVIDE FUNDING
ONLY FOR THE CITY OF
HALF MOON BAY THAT
CAN BE USED TO EN-
HANCE OUR LIBRARY, IN-
CREASE STREET MAIN-
TENANCE, IMPROVE SE-
NIOR SERVICES, INVEST
IN BUSINESS DEVELOP-
MENT AND TOURISM, IM-
PROVE SMITH FIELD
RECREATIONAL FACILI-
TIES, HELP FUND THE
NEW MAIN STREET
BRIDGE AND IMPROVE
OTHER GENERAL CITY
SERVICES, SHALL THE
CITY OF HALF MOON BAY
PASS A TEMPORARY
HALF-CENT GENERAL
SALES TAX THAT WILL
EXPIRE AFTER 3 YEARS,
WITH CITIZENS' OVER-
SIGHT?
YES ____ NO ____
The polls will be open be-
tween the hours of 7:00
A.M. and 8:00 P.M.
DATED this 12th day of Ju-
ly, 2012
Siobhan Smith
City Clerk
7/12/12
CNS-2344124#
SAN MATEO DAILY
JOURNAL
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250969
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Guns and Tactical, 360 El
Camino Real, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Peninsula Guns LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 07/01/12.
/s/ Jeannie Ganim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250802
The following person is doing business
as: ECS Corporate Events, 329 Spruce
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Elite Corporate Services, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Roger Magana /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250910
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 516 & 520 East Bellevue Ave-
nue Apartments, 520, East Bellevue Ave.
San Mateo, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Richard
Tod Spieker and Catherine R, Spieker,
60 Mulberry Ln., MENLO PARK, CA
94027. The business is conducted by a
Husband and Wife. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 06/12/2012
/s/ Richard Tod Spieker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250520
The following person is doing business
as: Satellite Cable Center, 2464 Alame-
da De Las Pulgas, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Basil Zaru, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Basil Zaru /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/12, 06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250868
The following person is doing business
as: Offroad Creeper, 214 Shaw Rd. Bldg.
8 Ste. 5, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Paul Camping, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
06/12/2012
/s/ Paul Camping /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250833
The following person is doing business
as: MGM Auto Xperts, 1004 S. Clare-
mont St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Eagle Maintenance Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/01/2012
/s/ John Woo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251102
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Kua Massage Therapy, 2) Kua
Massage, 601 South B St., Ste. A, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Karite Upuia Ah-
kiong 215 7th Ave., #4, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Karite Upuia Ahkiong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250652
The following person is doing business
as: A. Fowler Plumbing, 736 Fathom Dr.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Andrew
Fowler. same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/14/2011.
/s/ Andrew Fowler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250652
The following person is doing business
as: Blue Line Pizza, 1108 Burlingame
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: The
Pizza Alliance 2, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Angela Pace /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251104
The following person is doing business
as: 1) HMJConsulting, 2) HMJRecovery,
229 Valdez Ave., HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hazel Joanes, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/01/2002 .
/s/ Hazel Joanes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/12, 07/05/12, 07/12/12, 07/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251139
The following person is doing business
as: International Auto Body & Paint, 1172
Montgomery Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: International Auto Body &
Paint, Inc., CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Thelma Kotik /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251322
The following person is doing business
as: Brisbane Stables, 402 Industrial
Way., BRISBANE, CA 94005 is hereby
registered by the following owner: David
B. Peters, Po Box 612, Brisbane, CA
94005. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
0709/2012
/s/ David B. Peters /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251201
The following person is doing business
as: Sb Flooring, 2821 Fordham St EAST
PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Sergio Bar-
raza, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Sergio Barraza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/2/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251239
The following person is doing business
as: Lizardo Consulting, 1204 Burlingame
Ave., #10, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lauren Lizardo, 1411 Floribunda Ave.,
8A, BURLINGAME, CA 94010. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 06/01/2012.
/s/ Lauren Lizardo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/5/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251219
The following person is doing business
as: Divine Home Care, 2555 Flores St.
Ste 260, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Wild Karma, INC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/2007.
/s/ Robbin Beebe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/3/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Bradford Louie
Case Number 122477
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Bradford Louie. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Calvin
Louie in the Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo. The Petition for
Probate requests that Calvin Louie be
appointed as personal representative to
administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This
athourity will allow the personal repre-
sentative to take many actions without
obtaining court approval. Before taking
certain very important actions, however,
the personal representative will be re-
quired to give notice to interested per-
sons unless they have waived notice or
consented to the proposed action.) The
independent administration authority will
be granted unless an interested person
files an objection to the petition and
shows good cause why the court should
not grant the authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: August 15, 2012 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, 1st Floor, Redwood City,
CA 94063. If you object to the granting
of the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Mason J. Sacks
560 Winchester Blvd., Ste. 500
SAN JOSE, CA 95128
(408)358-4400
Dated: 06/26/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on June 28, July 5, 12, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
210 Lost & Found
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
296 Appliances
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
STAINLESS ELECTROLUX dishwasher
4 years old $99 (650)366-1812
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new, SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
THULE BIKE rack, for roof load bar,
Holds bike upright. $100 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress
$25, (650)873-8167
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $40 for
all. SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
298 Collectibles
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. (650)871-7200
SIGNED AUTOGRAPH Art and Gloria
Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
LEGO'S (2) Unopened, NINJAGO, La-
sha's Bite Cycle, 250 pieces; MONSTER
FIGHTERS, Swamp Creature, ages 7-14
$27.00 both, (650)578-9208
WIND-UP TOY train set, complete in the
box from the 50s, $80 obo (650)589-
8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
50s RRECORD player Motorola, it
works $50 obo Sold!
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUDIO SPEAKERS, (2) mint condition,
works great, Polt stereo for computer,
TV, $10.00 both SOLD!
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
H/P WINDOWS Desk Jet 840C Printer.
Like New. All hookups. $99.00
(650)344-7214
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
480 x 9600 DPI, Restores colors,
brightness, $40.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
304 Furniture
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, SOLD!
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all.SOLD!
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. SOLD!
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN/BAR STOOL wooden with
high back $99 (650)343-4461
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
SOLD!
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $30 each or both for $50. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $90,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
24
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Increasingly rare
PC monitors
5 Last name of the
start of 48-Across
9 Supplement
14 Flood notable
15 Iliad warrior
16 Rank
17 Site of
Napoleons 1804
coronation
19 Condors castle?
20 Reggie Miller, e.g.
22 Parting word
25 Everybody Hurts
band
26 Long-eared
hopper
31 9-3, 9-4 or 9-5
35 It might be casual:
Abbr.
36 Actress Falco et
al.
37 Hard to look at
38 Tolkien creatures
40 Last name of the
start of 20-Across
42 Not looking well
43 Hollandaise
ingredient
44 Salon offerings
46 [Sniff!]
47 Overly precious,
to a Brit
48 Reign between
the Qin and the
Three Kingdoms
50 Letters from your
parents?
52 Pernod flavoring
53 Actor born
7/13/1942 who
played characters
found in 20-, 26-
and 48-Across
60 Often-filtered
transmission
61 Degas subject
65 Photo finish
66 ... __ saw Elba
67 Grand ice cream
brand
68 Manuscript marks
69 Last name of the
start of 26-Across
70 Basketful,
perhaps
DOWN
1 Piers Morgan
Tonight channel
2 Milne marsupial
3 Bit of artwork
seen in NBA
games
4 Mouse reaction
5 H.S. safety org.
6 City WNW of Los
Angeles
7 Tibetan for
superior one
8 Farm team
9 With ones jaw on
the floor, so to
speak
10 Concocts
11 Jeanne __
12 Jon Arbuckles
pooch
13 When pigs flyeth!
18 Toughen
21 Knack
22 Four-time Indy
500 winner
23 Scopess
defender
24 December hanger
27 Tall, dark or
handsome: Abbr.
28 Flora and fauna
29 Togo neighbor
30 __ a Message:
INXS song
32 Court star with the
autobiography
Open
33 Doles out
34 Parting words
39 Picket Fences
Emmy winner
Tom
41 Pen name?
45 Marchers drum
48 Is ill with
49 Jackson or
Johnson
51 TVs younger Dr.
Crane
53 Garment edges
54 Latin lesson
word
55 Deserve
56 Upper, in Upper
Westphalia
57 Quaint negative
58 __ market
59 Chocolat
actress
62 Nev. neighbor
63 Where Cuomo is
gov.
64 Cheroot residue
By David Poole
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/12/12
07/12/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
306 Housewares
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
KITCHEN FAUCET- single handle,
W/spray - not used $19 (650)494-1687
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RONCO ROTTISERIE - New model,
black, all accessories, paid $150., asking
$75., (650)290-1960
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461 (650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
2 CANES 1 Irish Shillelagh 1 regular $25
SOLD
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
310 Misc. For Sale
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. $50 (650)302-0976
310 Misc. For Sale
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
CLASSIC TOY Train Magazines, (200)
mint condition, SOLD!
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm, SOLD!
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FREE DWARF orange tree (650)834-
4926
FULL QUEEN quilt $20 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
JOHN K KENNEDY Mementos, Books,
Magazines, Photos, Placards, Phono-
graph Records, Ect. $45 all
(650)223-7187
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MASSAGER CHAIR - Homedics, Heat,
Timer, Remote, like new, $75., (650)344-
7214
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
ONE BOYS Superman Christmas Wrap-
ping paper $2., (650)873-8167
OUTDOOR SCREENS - New 4 Panel
Wooden Outdoor Screen, Retail $130
With Metal Supports, $85. obo, call Ma-
ria, (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TABLECLOTH - Medium Blue color rec-
tangular tablecloth 70" long 52" wide with
12 napkins $15., (650)755-8238
310 Misc. For Sale
STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Christ-
mas Wrapping Paper Retail $6 selling $2
each 6-7 yards, (650)873-8167
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLE CLOTH oval 120" by 160" with
12 napkins medium blue , SOLD!
TICKETS, BROADWAY by the Bay, (3)
Marvelous Wonderets Sat. 7/14; Chorus
Line Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat.
11/10 Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TO THE MOON The 1969 story in pic-
tures, text and sound. $35
(650)223-7187
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
TRUMPET VINE tree in old grove pots 2
@ $15 ea SOLD
UNOPENED, HARDCOVEED 556 page
BBQ book from many countries recipes
for spice rubs, sauces, grilling, photos
$12.00, SOLD!
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
12 STRING epiphone guitar. New, with
fender gig bag. $150 firm (650)430-9621
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$25., (650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN! GO GREEN!
We We Buy GOLD Buy GOLD
You You Get The Get The
$ $ Green Green $ $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $50 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
2 ANTIQUE Glass Towel bars $60 pair
(650)271-0731
3 FRAMLESS shower door 3/8th thick,
25x66, 24x70, 26x74, $30 ea.
(650)271-0731
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, $25
(650)594-1494
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19., SOLD!
GOLF CLUBS - women RH complete set
W/ Cart & Bag used for only 5 lessons
like new $95 SOLD!
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45 SOLD!
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$65 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
ONE BUCKET of golf balls - 250 total,
various brands, $25., (650)339-3195
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
25 Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
DOWN SIZING SALE
Saturday, July 14
9am-2pm
4019 Bayview Ave.,
San Mateo
Tools, Books, Nice Chairs.
Large Plush Toys and More!
FABULOUS
FINDS
in Pescadero
July 14 at
Town-Wide Barn Sale
Maps and details at
http://www.pescaderobarnsale.info
and at all 14 locations and the pocket
park on the corner of
Stage and Pescadero Creek Roads.
A bonanza of bargains: antique Mon-
arch wood stove, motorcycles, horse
tack, fishing gear, bikes, Lazy Boy
leather chair, BBQ/smoker, fine col-
lectibles, jewelry, toys, and pet sup-
plies, vintage china and linens, art-
work, Christmas decorations, antique
garden art, fresh lavender bundles
and luggage. Food sales benefit local
Girl Scout troop and Pescadero PTA
and supports the annual school trip to
Washington DC. Every site will be
clearly designated, several selling on
July 15.
GARAGE SALE
SATURDAY JULY 14
8am to 12pm
717 Masson Ave,
SAN BRUNO
Bookcases, sofa, loveseat, furniture,
tools, fridge, kitchenware, misc. and
more!
GARAGE SALE
1020 Irwin Street
BELMONT
SUNDAY ONLY
9am-3pm
All kinds of great stuff
322 Garage Sales
MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
1383 Parrott Dr.
San Mateo
July 14 & 15
9AM-4PM
Tools, Antiques, clothing,
furniture, plants,
refrigerator, stove,
housewares, toys and
More!
SAN MATEO
Sat, July 14th
8:30am 3:30PM
Fiesta Gardens
Neighborhood
Garage Sale
Over 30 homes
Delaware @ Bermuda
Follow Signs
THE THRIFT SHOP
BAG SALE !!!
July 14, 21, 28
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE
SALE
Four houses
worth of treasure
811 Revere Way,
Emerald Hills
SUNDAY
JULY 15
10am to 5pm
Antiques, Eastlake
furniture,electronics,
bedroom furntiure, collecti-
ble dolls, carousel horse,
crystal, linens, fabrics, kitch-
enware, Oriental rugs, throw
rugs, lots of wicker, garden
supplies, clothing, bed lin-
ens and much more!
Cash Only.
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. (650)348-6428
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
REDWOOD CITY- 1 Bedroom, all elec-
tric kitchen, close to downtown,
$1095./month, plus $700 deposit. Call
Jean (650)361-1200.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
PLYMOUTH 72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
635 Vans
01 XKR Jaguar Silver 96K asking $8900
OBO (650)740-1743
1999 CHRYSLER Town & Country Van,
Runs Well $700 SOLD!
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
WE FIX CARS
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, (650)588-7005
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. SOLD!
670 Auto Parts
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
(415)999-4947
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning Cleaning Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction Construction
26
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
De Hoyos
Framing Foundations
(650) 387-8950
General Framing
Doors & Windows
Siding
(Hardy Plank Specialist)
Dry Rot & Termite
Additions
Finely Crafted Decks
Repairs
Lic# 968477 Ins/Bons
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
to the
Burlingame
Leafblower
Law
Fully Compliant
Quality
Gardening
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
ADW SERVICES
Small Jobs, Hauling, Car-
pentry, Flooring, Decks,
Dry Rot Repair, Siding,
Bathrooms
(650)438-0454 (650)438-0454
Lic. 968619
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe Call Joe
(650)722-3925 (650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
JONS HAULING
Serving the Peninsula since 1976
FREE ESTIMATES
Junk and debris removal,
Yard/lot clearing,
Furniture, appliance hauling.
Specializing in hoarder clean up
(650)393-4233 (650)393-4233
Hauling
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
Sprinkler systems New fences
Flagstone Interlocking pavers
New driveways Clean-ups
Hauling Gardening
Retaining walls Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281 (415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861 (650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955 650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320 (650)271-1320
Plumbing
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm,
or by appt.
650-388-8836 650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212 (650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733 (650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave.
@ S. Railroad
San Mateo
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo San Mateo
(650)579-1500 (650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
Insurance
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
$60 one hour
body massage + table shower
45 mins $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191 650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
28
Thursday July 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Jewelry Silver Watches Diamonds
1Z11 80fll08M0 90 0J400
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/12
WEBUY