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Between the Earth & Sky

EARLY PHILIPPINE SHELTERS


ARCH 514 | History of Filipino Architecture
Slideshow developed by: Arch. Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP Bohol Island State University | College of Architecture & Engineering

CAVE DWELLINGS AS EARLY HUMAN SHELTER

Tabon Man refers to fossilized anatomically modern human remains discovered in the Tabon Caves in Lipuun Point in Quezon, Palawan in the Philippines on May 28, 1962 by Dr. Robert B. Fox, an American anthropologist of the National Museum of the Philippines.

Tabon Cave

Tabon Cave

The Taaw't Bato means "people of the rock". They are not actually a separate language or ethnic group, but rather a small community of traditional southwestern Palawanos who happen to reside in the crater of an extinct volcano during certain seasons of the year, in houses built on raised floors inside caves though others have set their homes on the open slopes.
A family of Taut Batu (People of the Cave) at the entrance of Pangi-Pangi cave, in Singnapan Valley.

A Tau't Batu man makes lunch near his cave abode, a raised platform of bamboo, where his family sits in the background. (Victor Paul Borg)

http://www.jacobimages.com

http://www.jacobimages.com

Lean-To or Portable Shelter


The food gatherer, the fisherman, or the hunter, who moved from one place to another in his search for food and game, fashioned the lean-to from a frame made of tree branches and twigs, using leaves and fronds for sidings.

Tree House or Arboreal Shelters

Banaue Rice Terraces

LongSheng

Guilin

Yuanyang

Longji

References
Lico, Gerard (2008). Arkitekturang Filipino: A History of Architecture and Urbanism in the Philippines. Quezon City: The University of the Philippines Press.