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The Power of the Question: Data Driven Instruction in Math

December 12, 2012 Sponsored by: Friends of Education, Beth Topoluk Student Achievement MN, Glory Kibbel

Facilitators for today:

Olga Canning, Title 1 Math Teacher, St. Croix Preparatory Academy Lisa Heathcote, Lower School Director, St. Croix Preparatory Academy Lori Magstadt, Academic Specialist, Cologne Academy Maggie Rowan, Curriculum Coordinator, Aspen Academy

Introductions

Introduce yourself Share your Data Driven Instruction story: What datadriven systems are in place at your school?

Participant Objectives:
Understand rationale for the Power of the Question through DDI Understand the importance of Standards Focused Instruction/Assessment Identify appropriate questions for interim assessments Utilize the Power of the Question: Rigor and Depth of Knowledge Question Identify and Utilize DDI tools and resources

Data Driven Instruction

Rationale Definition Objectives

What is data driven instruction?

The philosophy that schools should constantly focus on one simple question: Are our students LEARNING?

The Four Key Principles:

1. Assessments: Create rigorous interim assessments that provide meaningful data. Build by borrowing: Identify and implement best practices from high-achieving teachers and schools 2. Analysis: Examine results to identify strengths and shortcomings 3. Action: Teach effectively what students most need to learn 4. a Data-driven CULTURE: Build an environment in which data driven instruction can survive and thrive

Curriculum Alignment

Understanding By Design

Standard
STANDARD 1.1.1 Count, compare and represent whole numbers up to 120, with an emphasis on groups of tens and ones.

Benchmark

Description
Compare and order whole numbers up to 100.

Skill

Q # Question

1.1.1.5 Compare & Order Numbers

1.1.1.5 Compare & Order Numbers

1.1.1.5 Compare & Order Numbers

compare and order numbers up to 100 Compare using ordinal numbers and location ("left" and "right") Compare using ordinal numbers and location ("left" and "right")

Fill in the missing number. 15 __________ comes just after 8.

The __________ plate from the left has a cherry 22 on it.

The 3rd butterfly has lost a wing. 25 Circle the 5th butterfly.

Initial Instruction with Teacher

Understanding By Design
Review with Teacher Assistant

Game/ Activity that reinforces the skills

A Teachers Story

Worksheet/ formative Assessment

Student Results for 1st Grade Math Pretest

First Grade Math Pretest


Number of Students within each 10% bracket in First Grade

20 15 10 5

0
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Student Results for 2nd Grade Math Pretest

Second Grade Math Pretest


Number of Students within each 10% bracket in Second Grade

20 15 10 5

0
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Student Results for 3rd Grade Math Pretest

Third Grade Math Pretest


Number of Students within each 10% bracket in Third Grade

20 15 10 5

0
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Student Results for 4th Grade Math Pretest

Fourth Grade Math Pretest


Number of Students within each 10% bracket in Fourth Grade

15

10
5

0
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Student Results for 5th Grade Math Pretest

Fifth Grade Math Pretest


Number of Students within each 10% bracket in Fourth Grade

5 4

3
2 1

0
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Student Results for 6th Grade Math Pretest

Sixth Grade Math Pretest


Number of Students within each 10% bracket in Sixth Grade

10 8

6
4 2

0
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Student Results for 7th Grade Math Pretest

Seventh Grade Math Pretest


Number of Students within each 10% bracket in Seventh Grade

6 5

4
3 2 1

0
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Student Results for 8th Grade Math Pretest

Eighth Grade Math Pretest


Number of Students within each 10% bracket in Eighth Grade

3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Individual Student Learning Plans

Subject

Fall Score

Spring Score

ACADEMIC GOALS Academic Goals & Strategies

Monitoring Date

Teacher Comments

Reading

The teacher will help the student reach this goal through various strategies including; Direct instruction of SRA language arts curriculum Ability based small and large group instruction Student Name: LEXIA an individualized computer based reading Interim 4: program Reading: Independent Reading Projects School Year: 2012-2013 Mathematics: Modified Spelling Beginning date of plan: September 2012 Math _________ goal will be met by engaging in teacher directed instruction, participating in small group math activities, using the IXL website in school and at home, and reviewing previous lessons by completing extra practice worksheet packets and homework assignments.

Progress Monitoring will occur at least quarterly using interim assessments in Reading. Score:

Progress Status* I S M *

Progress Monitoring will occur at least quarterly using interim assessments in Math.

Kindergarten Math Interim 1 Report


Student average on standards taught since the beginning of the school year

120%

100%
80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Pretest Interim 1

Third Grade Math Interim Results


Student average on standards taught since the beginning of the school year

3.1.1.3 10,000 3.1.1.4 Round 3.1.1.5 3.1.1.2 Place Value 3.1.1.1 3.1.2.2 Real-

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Pretest Interim 1

Fifth Grade Math Interim 1 Report


Student average on standards taught since the beginning of the school year

120% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Pretest Interim 1

Eight Grade Math Interim 1 Report


Student average on standards taught since the beginning of the school year

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Pretest Interim 1

Assessment Drives Instruction

Standards (and objectives) are meaningless until you define how to assess them.

Because of this, assessments are the starting point for instruction, not the end.

Ah-Ha Moments

Shift in focus from what was taught to what was learned. Common interim assessments within grade levels and across the grade levels. Dont analyze without action Assessments are not the end of the teaching and learning process; they are the starting point.

Ah-ha Moments cont.

Data-driven instruction thats implemented properly does not require teacher buy in, it creates it.

Data-driven instruction allows us to find the holes or gaps in our teaching which will make us better educators and our students better learners.

Principles for Effective Assessments

COMMON INTERIM:
At least quarterly Common across all teachers of the same grade level DEFINE THE STANDARDSALIGNED TO: To state test (format, content, & length)

To instructional sequence (curriculum)


To college-ready expectations

Assessments:

REASSESS: Standards that appear on the first interim assessment appear again on subsequent interim assessments WRONG ANSWERS: Illuminate misunderstanding

TRANSPARENT: Teachers see the assessments in advance

The Power of the Question: Analysis of Math Assessment Items


1. 2. 3. 4. 50% of 20: 67% of 81: Shawn got 7 correct answers out of 10 possible answers on his science test. What percent of questions did he get correct? J.J. Redick was on pace to set an NCAA record in career free throw percentage. Leading into the NCAA tournament in 2004, he made 97 of 104 free throw attempts. What percentage of free throws did he make? J.J. Redick was on pace to set an NCAA record in career free throw percentage. Leading into the NCAA tournament in 2004, he made 97 of 104 free throw attempts. In the first tournament game, Redick missed his first five free throws. How far did his percentage drop from before the tournament game to right after missing those free throws?

5.

6. J.J. Redick and Chris Paul were competing for the best free-throw shooting percentage. Redick made 94% of his first 103 shots, while Paul made 47 out of 51 shots. Which one had a better shooting percentage? In the next game, Redick made only 2 of 10 shots while Paul made 7 of 10 shots. What are their new overall shooting percentages? Who is the better shooter? Jason argued that if Paul and J.J. each made the next ten shots, their shooting percentages would go up the same amount. Is this true? Why or why not?

Assessment Big Ideas:

In an open-ended question, the rubric defines the rigor. In a multiple choice question, the options define the rigor.

As you write questions:

Are questions aligned in CONTENT? What is the interim assessment missing? Are questions aligned in FORMAT/LENGTH?

Are questions COLLEGE-READY expectations?

What do the standards really mean?

What verbs and nouns are used? What do these mean to you? What do these mean to a student? What should the student be able to DO? How does this inform your assessment and instruction?

Strategies within standards


Standard: 1.1.2.2 Compose and decompose numbers up to 12 with an emphasis on making ten. Strategies students need to master this standard:

solve addition and subtraction problems using a variety of thinking strategies solve addition and subtraction problems in part-part-total, adding to, taking away from and comparing situations explain how they solved adding to, part-part-whole, taking away from, and comparing problems combine and partition numbers to 12 without counting by ones. For example, recognize that 6 is 5 and 1, 3 and 3, 4 and 2, etc. composing and decomposing is continued to all numbers to 12 use doubles and doubles plus 1 to find ways to break numbers apart and put them together. For example 7 can be seen as double 3 plus one or 4 and 3.

Inspiring Great Thinking: Blooms Taxonomy of Thinking / Webbs Depth of Knowledge


Bloom: What type of thinking (verbs) is needed to complete a task?

Webb: How deeply do you have to understand the content to successfully interact with it? How complex or abstract is the content?

Depth of Knowledge is about depth & complexity not difficulty


The intended student learning outcome determines the DOK level. What mental processing must occur?

NOTE: Verbs may appear to point to a DOK level, but it is what comes after the verb that is the best indicator of rigor/DOK level.
Example: Describe the Republican/Democratic party OR Describe how the Republican and Democratic party are alike and different.

DOK Levels

DOK 1: Recall / Reproduction DOK 2: Basic Application of Skills / Concepts DOK 3: Strategic Thinking

DOK 4: Extended Thinking

Increasing Rigor Using Data-Driven Best Practices:


Review Increasing Rigor Document with others from your subject area or grade level. Put a question mark next to activities that you want to understand more deeply in order to implement effectively. Put a star next to activities that sound particularly doable for you that you want to implement on a regular basis in your classroom.

Interim Assessment Resources

Test Specifications Learning Point Navigator Saxon Test Generator CD STEM SciMathMN

Test Specifications

http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/EdExc/Testing/TestSpec/ Test specifications are specific rules and characteristics that guide the development of a tests content and format They indicate which strands, sub-strands, standards and benchmarks will be assessed on the test and in what proportions. Test specifications are excellent tools for gaining an indepth understanding of the content and format of the tests.

Grade 3 Item Counts by Standard

Range of Items Per Strand

Type and Number of Items

Context and Item Limitations

Cognitive Complexity

Interim Assessment Resources

Learning Point Navigator https://mn.learningpointnavigator.com/Home.aspx

Interim Assessment Resources

Saxon Test Generator CD Software

The ExamView Assessment Suite

ExamView Test Generator

Interim Assessment Resources

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math http://www.mn-stem.com/

Interim Assessment Resources

SciMathMN http://www.scimathmn.org/stemtc/

Your Turn: Assessment Writing

1. Decide what date you will give the assessment. 2. According to your curriculum map, select the standards that you will have already taught. 3. Select how many questions of each standard and to what depth level you want your questions in each standard. 4. Using the question bank provided or the test resources and select questions.

Personal Reflection

What are my big takeaways for leading the use of quality assessments in my school? What questions do I have and what things do I want to learn to be an even more effective leader in this area? What materials and resources are available to support me in this area?

As a School

What are our shared understandings of key action steps listed in this workshop that we are going to implement in your school?