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CONCURRENT ENGINEERING

TRADITIONAL ENGINEERING VS. CONCURRENT ENGINEERING

In traditional engineering a relatively short time is spent defining the product.

The goal of Concurrent Engineering is

1. Minimize the product life cycle - Eliminate the redesign procedure 2. Decrease production cost - results from the minimization of the product life cycle 3. Maximize product quality - By spending more time and money initially in the design cycle and ensuring that the concept selection is optimized, the company can increase the prospect of delivering a quality product to the customer. 4. Teamwork - Human Resources are working together for a common product.

1. Improved process (better game plan, improved clarity) a.Concurrent process b.Focus on quality, cost and delivery c.Emphasis on competitive benchmarking 2. Closer cooperation (better teamwork), improved unity a.Integrated organization b.Employee involvement, empowerment c.Strategic relations with suppliers

New-Product Work
Critical Steps 1. Critical concept 2. Will it work? 3. Can it be made? 4. Satisfy customer needs 1. Consistently? 2. Profitable? Activity Fundamental Engineering Fundamental Engineering Basic concurrent engineering Engineering Quality Function Deployment Robust design Strategy

Efficient and coordinated? Efficient process-clarity Cooperation-unity

CONCURRENT ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS

1.NEED FOR INTEGRATING DESIGN WITH OTHER FUNCTIONS 2.INCREASED COMPETITION 3.NEW PRODUCTION METHODS 4.LEAD TIME

SOME FACTORS OF GOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

IMPORTANT FACTORS IN CONCURRENT ENGINEERING PRACTICE


1. Organizational factors: a. Cross-functional Teams b. Liaison Personnel c. Job Rotation 2. SOME HELPFUL RULE BASED METHODS: a. Product Design Methods Design for Manufacturing (DFM) Design for Quality Design for Cost Design for Assembly (DFA) Design for Safety Design for Reliability Design for X b. Integrated Computer Analysis

Problem to implements concurrent engineering: 1. Company is technologically driven, not market driven 2. Slow product development cycle a. Friction between functional areas b. Vague or improper project goals 3. Customers or lead users ignored during product design

Additional Roadblocks
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Seven Organizational Roadblocks a. Lack of top management support b. Inadequate organizational climate c. Protective functional managers d. Inadequate reward systems e. Lack of customer involvement f. Lack of supplier involvement g. Fear of loss of creativity Five Technical Barriers a. Making the cultural transformation b. Effecting organizational change c. CE team building d. Providing adequate support technologies e. Fostering role definition and interaction