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Equipment Application 4.

Sortation Sorting It Out


1. Accumulation

2. Central Merge 3. Induction 4. Sortation 5. Recirculation

6. After-sort Lines

Slide 1

Equipment Application: Sorters


The following information can be found in the Manuals and Literature documentation.

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Slide 2

Equipment Application: Sorters


The Equipment Sheets have detailed information for sorter induction units and for each sorter type.

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Slide 3

Sortation Devices Autosort 1 Trap Arm Sort Station


Operation: Arm swings out between cartons Case contacts arm at shallow angle, slides along arm to the stop flag Arm swings closed pulling the case off the belt sorting conveyor

Features: Air Operated. 10 to 15 cpm. 23 cpm maximum. Product orientation is rotated 90 degrees Net price, $1,097 For 30 wide unit Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Simple, low-to-no maintenance Low cost per sort station

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Slide 4

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 1 Trap Arm When to Use It


Advantages Low cost per station Positive sort, positive tracking on (belt) sorter Large number of sorts possible on single sorter or few sorts possible on a long sorter. High density storage in after-sort line Low-to-No maintenance Changes case orientation Does not use line shaft technology

Disadvantages Changes case orientation Limited sort rate Must add guarding if used in people work area Single side sorter

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Slide 5

Sortation Devices Autosort 2 Pusher Sort Station


Operation: Cushion face of pusher is activated when carton is directly in front of unit. Pusher extends, moving carton off of sort belt. Pusher retracts to home position for next sort.

Features: Air Operated. 30 to 40 cpm. 40 cpm reasonable maximum. Product orientation is rotated 90 degrees List price, $8,800 For 30 wide unit Benefits: Higher rates for 90 degree sortation Low cost per sort station

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Slide 6

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 2 Pusher When to Use It


Advantages Positive sort, positive tracking on (belt) sorter Large number of sorts possible on single sorter or few sorts possible on a long sorter. High density storage in after-sort line Changes case orientation

Disadvantages High(er) cost per station Changes case orientation Limited sort rate Single side sorter

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Slide 7

Sortation Devices Autosort 3 Bow Arm Sort Station


Operation: Arm swings out between cartons. Case contacts arm at shallow angle, slides along arm and onto the after-sort line. Arm swings closed.

Features: Air Operated. 15 to 30 cpm. 35 cpm maximum. Product orientation is maintained List price, $1,850 For 30 wide unit Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Simple, low-to-no maintenance Low cost per sort station

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Slide 8

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 3 Bow Arm When to Use It


Advantages Low cost per station Positive sort, positive tracking on (belt) sorter Large number of sorts possible on single sorter or few sorts possible on a long sorter. Does not change case orientation Good device to sort totes.

Disadvantages Limited sort rate Can cause carton rotation with square boxes, especially if cartons are not aligned to divert arm. Single side sorter
Can be used for both side sorting if the products are same size

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Slide 9

Sortation Devices Autosort 4 Flat Face Sort Station


Operation: Arm swings out between cartons Case contacts arm, slides along and is pushed by the arm. Arm swings closed.

Features: Air Operated. 30 to 65 cpm. Product orientation is maintained List price, $3,518 For 30 wide unit Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Simple, low-to-no maintenance Low cost per sort station

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Slide 10

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 4 Flat Face When to Use It


Advantages Low cost per station High rate sort device Positive sort, positive tracking on (belt) sorter Large number of sorts possible on single sorter or few sorts possible on a long sorter. Does not change case orientation Good device to sort totes (maximum 40 cpm) Disadvantages A good sort action, but, at higher rates (greater than 45 cpm) carton (ie, label) orientation is only 90% repeatable. Can cause carton rotation with square boxes, especially if cartons are not aligned to divert arm. Single side sorter

When to use it: 30 to 45 cpm sortation systems that: Have open or closed cartons 45 to 70 cpm shipping systems that: Have closed cartons Dont require consistent label orientation Have a high number of divert stations Sortation systems that have a wide range of cartons, from small to large, light weight to heavy Sortation systems that must handle poor quality cartons, such as import quality rice paper boxes with rounded bottoms. Sortation systems with many divert points.

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Slide 11

Equipment Application: Sorters Swing Arm Sorter,Things to Consider


Carton alignment for bow arm and flat face arm sorters, the best sort action requires the carton to be positioned very close to the sort arm. This minimizes the impact between sort arm and carton and promotes consistent carton turning rather than carton spinning. Case orientation square cartons have a tendency to rotate during the sort action, especially if the carton has some initial rotation from the accumulation / induction process. To minimize case rotation, insure that cartons are straight on the sorter belt. Sort station activation timing - Follow the sort station tune up procedure. Adjust the flow controls for smooth, hit speed arm movement. Adjust the sorter tracking controls for a consistent, repeatable sort activation point. This is important for consistent repeatable carton sort action. All sort stations on a sorter should have exactly the same activation point.

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Slide 12

Equipment Application: Sorters Swing Arm Sorter, Things to Consider


Re-orienting cartons - Pie chutes and trough chutes can be used to square off cartons that have been rotated by the sort arm action.

Powered after-sort lines powered sweep units provide the best control of cartons during the sort process. Slaved power sweeps are about the same cost as dense pack skatewheel sweeps, so use power if you can slave it.

Air supply. Dont starve the sort station for air. For high air use sort stations like the Autosort 4 Flat Face Sort Station you may have to restrict the number of consecutive sorts to the same station to prevent air pressure drop and erratic sort arm performance.

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Slide 13

Equipment Application: Sorters Swing Arm Sorter,Things to Consider

Powered turns when using belt turns to connect sorters, and higher rate and/or speed systems, consider using 5 ft. inside radius curves. This will reduce cartons slinging to the outside or tipping over. After-sort sweep use a connection kit to facilitate the bolt-up and set the elevation of the sweep below the belt sorter per the instructions. You want the sweep to take over control of the carton so the belt doesnt spin the carton. Sorter drive - For the belt sorters, provide room for the 6 ft. end drive unit plus 4 ft. or 6 ft. for the automatic take up springs. A center drive unit is available if there is insufficient room for an end drive.

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Slide 14

Sortation Devices Autosort 5 Pop up Sort Station


Operation: Wheels pop up underneath cartons Case is steered off the belt onto the takeaway. Wheels lower before next case.

Features: Air Operated. 40 to 80 cpm. Product orientation is maintained Net price, $6,105 For 30 wide unit Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Gentle handling of product.

Consider a MultiBelt Sorter instead.

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Slide 15

Problem Set #3

Is there any other useful information on the Sorter Spreadsheet?

Slide 16

Problem Set #3

Slide 17

Sortation Devices Autosort 9 AutoRoll 30 and 90 (MDR) Pop-up Wheel Sort Station
Operation: Wheels Lift Up Between Rollers Wheels transfer product to a take away conveyor. Wheels lower before next carton

Features: 24 volt D.C. motor driven Air operated Up to 40 cpm 30 degree and 90 degree take-away units Net price, approx $4,803 For 30 wide unit Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Simple, low-to-no maintenance

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Slide 18

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 9 MDR Pop up When to Use It


Advantages Great for single-point sorting. A gentle sort, consistent and repeatable. Does not change case orientation Good device to sort totes.

When to use it: Single sort point required. 10 to 40 cpm sort / divert points. When the customer does not want a swing arm sorter some people simply want a bottom type sorter When there are people working near the sorter causing safety concerns with the swing arm sorter. When case orientation after-sort is important.

Disadvantages High cost per divert Low to medium rate sort device Difficult for electric controls to make into a long multiple-divert sorter

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Slide 19

Sortation Devices Autosort 10 AutoRoll MDR UBT Sort Station


Operation: Belts Lift Up Between Rollers Belts transfer product to a parallel or perpendicular conveyor. Belts lower before next carton

Features: 24 VDC or 460 VAC motor driven Air operated (Electric lift option special) Up to 35 cpm for parallel take away. Up to 40 cpm for perpendicular take away. Net price, Approx $4,447 For 30 wide unit Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Simple, low maintenance

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Slide 20

Sortation Devices Autosort 10 AutoRoll MDR UBT Sort Station


24 VDC Right Angle Transfer
Transfer rate 10 cpm 30 cpm depending upon product characteristics. Pneumatic lift (Electric lift special available) (1) 24 VDC drive roller for transfer bands (1) 24 VDC drive roller for carrying rollers Options: Transfer bands 4 or 5 Extended widths 3, 6, 9, or 12

Note, with the 24 Vdc transfer, a receiving transfer can be required!


In lieu of the receiving transfer, a powered gap roller can be provided.

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Slide 21

Sortation Devices Autosort 10 AutoRoll MDR UBT Sort Station


460 VAC Right Angle Transfer
Transfer rate 30+ cpm depending upon product characteristics. Tall narrow open-flap cartons may tip Pneumatic lift actuation. (1) 480 VAC HP motor for transfer bands Use of a VFD for the transfer band motor will reduce carton tipping. (1) 24 VDC drive roller for carrying rollers Transfer bands are on 3 centers. Easy to remove and change position. Options: Transfer bands 4, 5, 6, or 7 Extended widths 3, 6, 9, or 12 Note, with the 460 VAC transfer, a receiving transfer or gap roller are normally not required!

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Slide 22

Problem Set #4

1. Which MDR right angle transfer would you suggest here, 726 or 727? 2. Who would you consult before ordering this equipment?

3. Is a gap roller required here?

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Slide 23

Problem Set #4

1. Which MDR right angle transfer would you suggest here, 726 or 727? 726, light duty transfer based on the rate and weight of items to be transferred 2. Who would you consult before ordering this equipment? My controls vendor, to discuss how they would control this. Discrete or Ethernet? 3. Is a gap roller required here? No, based on the light weight product.

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Slide 24

Sortation Devices Autosort 16 MB30 Pop up Sort Station


Operation: Wheels pop up underneath cartons Case is steered off the belt onto the takeaway. Wheels lower before next case.

Features: Air operated lifting action. Divert wheels are slave driven from the multi-belts. Five rows of divert wheels 30 to 100+ cpm. Product orientation is maintained

Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Gentle handling of product. Single or both-side sorting

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Slide 25

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 16 MB30 Pop up When to Use It


Advantages Medium to high rate sort device A relatively gentle sort, consistent and repeatable. Does not change case orientation Good device to sort cartons and totes. Low cost per station Single and both-side sorter Can integrate with the MB90 sort station Disadvantages High cost per foot Maximum speed of 400 fpm Cartons can start to skip over the pop up station as speeds increase over 300 fpm. Not good for small light-weight cartons at high sort rates.

When to use it: 30 to 100 cpm sortation systems. When the customer does not want a swing arm sorter some people simply want a bottom type sorter When there are people working near the sorter causing safety concerns with the swing arm sorter. When case orientation after-sort is important.

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Slide 26

Sortation Devices Autosort 17 MB90 Pop up Roller Sort Station


Operation: Rollers pop up underneath cartons Case is diverted off the belt onto the takeaway. Rollers lower before next case. Features: Air operated lifting action. Divert rollers are motor driven. 20 to 60+ cpm. Product orientation is rotated 90 deg. Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Gentle handling of product. Single or both-side sorting

Notice how the divert rollers lift in the direction of flow to reduce carton skidding when diverting.

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Slide 27

Equipment Application: Sorters When to use it: Autosort 17 MBS90 Pop up Roller 20 to 60 cpm sortation systems. When the layout requires both-side sorting When to Use It
Advantages Low to medium rate sort device A relatively gentle sort, consistent and repeatable. 90 deg. case orientation Good device to sort cartons and totes. Single and both-side sorter Can integrate with the MB30 sort station When there are people working near the sorter causing safety concerns with the swing arm sorter. When 90 deg. case orientation is required.

Disadvantages High cost per station High cost per foot Maximum speed of 300 fp Not good for tall and/or narrow cartons at high sort rates.

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Slide 28

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 17 MBS90 Pop up Roller Design Details


Sort Station
Motor driven rollers provide the divert function. No belt snubing down and under the slave drive rollers so the sorter can be very long. Divert unit bolts into a standard multi-belt conveyor bed sections. Can be field installed or moved on 1 increments. Pneumatic flow controls are used to adjust the rack lift and lower movements. Divert rollers lift in the direction of flow to reduce carton skidding when diverting. Available in three nominal widths: 18 25 32 Case side orientation is not required!

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Slide 29

Problem Set #5

1. Use the sorter spreadsheet to price and confirm speed for the AS17 sorter.

2. How does carton alignment effect rate?

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Slide 30

Problem Set #5

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Slide 31

Problem Set #5

1. Use the sorter spreadsheet to price and confirm speed for the AS17 sorter.

2. How does carton alignment effect rate?


Narrow cartons aligned to opposite side of divert slow divert action and ultimate rate capability.

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Slide 32

Sortation Devices Autosort 13 Sliding Shoe Sort Station


Operation: Air activated switch directs pusher shoes into divert track Pusher shoes direct carton onto aftersort sweep Activate only the pusher shoes needed for a carton

Features: 50 to 120 cpm. Product orientation is maintained Up to 350 fpm Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Simple, low-to-no maintenance Low cost per sort station Divert to either side

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Slide 33

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 13 Sliding Shoe When to Use It When to use it:
Advantages High rate sort device Positive sort, Gentle, Low impact Does not change case orientation Good for poor quality cartons, totes Good for small products 50-120 CPM Sortation systems When a customer wants positive sorting of a wide variety of cartons. When you must sort to both sides.

Disadvantages High cost per foot Noise levels from high speed systems

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Slide 34

Sortation Devices Autosort 20 Sliding Shoe Sort Station


Operation: Electric activated switch directs pusher shoes into divert track Pusher shoes direct carton onto aftersort sweep Activate only the pusher shoes needed for a carton

Features: 50 to 250+ cpm. 150 cpm dual side sorting Product orientation is maintained Up to 600 fpm Breakaway safety shoe design Benefits: A positive consistent divert of product. Simple, low-to-no maintenance Low cost per sort station Divert to either side

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Slide 35

Equipment Application: Sorters Autosort 20 Sliding Shoe When to Use It When to use it:
Advantages Highest rate sort device Positive sort, Gentle, Low impact Does not change case orientation Good for poor quality cartons, totes Good for small products Infinite switch positioning Networkable controls Maintenance friendly 50-250+ CPM Sortation systems When a customer wants positive sorting of a wide variety of cartons. When you must sort to both sides. 150 CPM dual side sortation!

Disadvantages High cost per foot

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Slide 36

Equipment Application 5. Recirculation What if it doesnt get sorted?


1. Accumulation

2. Central Merge 3. Induction 4. Sortation 5. Recirculation

6. After-sort Lines

Slide 37

Recirculation Things to Consider.

Recirculation Line Issues: It has to run fast enough to absorb all the sort rate. How many cartons to absorb before shutting down the sorter? Lane full sensor should be set to allow room to absorb a full sorter. Needs to be long enough to avoid loop lock Typically, you have to absorb a high rate (the sorter rate) and release at a slow rate.

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Slide 38

Recirculation Conveyor Options

Recirculation Line Accumulation Conveyor Options:


Sort Rate and Case Size allows LRPE or MDR singulation mode Belt speeds less than 200FPM Use LRPE with singulation mode for fill and discharge. Is your rate slow enough to allow the recirculation to be merged with a second lower rate induction? Maybe with a no read divert? Use LRPE with singulation fill at charge end and slug at discharge end. Care must be taken in this situation to avoid loop lock, a situation where the sorter and recirculation line are full therefore making it impossible to restart the system without manual interaction.

Sort Rate and Case Size allows LRPE or MDR singulation mode but belt speeds exceed 200 FPM.

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Slide 39

Equipment Application 6. After Sort Lines Here it comes. What are you going to do with it?
1. Accumulation

2. Central Merge 3. Induction 4. Sortation 5. Recirculation

6. After-sort Lines

Slide 40

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Design / Layout Issues to consider for After-sort Lines: Sorter Rate Carton Sizes, weights All one size, all similar size, wide range of sizes from very small to large All one weight, all similar weight, wide range of weights from very light to heavy Quality of carton New boxes Re-Used boxes Rice Paper type import (ie, BAD) boxes Uniformly or Off-Center loaded boxes Low height, Cube, or Tall boxes Case rate to each sort line Slug rate to each sort line Sorter rate ? Or less ? How many cartons in the slug at sorter rate before forcing recirculation? How much accumulation is required? or- What operation happens at the end of the line? Carton/Label orientation after the sort.

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Slide 41

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Example 1:
Sort rate Case sizes Min Max Design 12 x 12 24 x 18 21 x 18 40 End-of-line operation: Manual pallet building for shipping Gravity accumulation was chosen for the shipping lines, the system had the height for gravity flow and near-by operators if a carton flow problem occurred. (and, the customer had a budget problem)

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Slide 42

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Example 2:
Sort rate Case sizes Mini Maxi Design 12 x 12 24 x 18 21 x 18 40 End-of-line operation: Pack to light operation Powered decline and powered accumulation was chosen for the PTL lines. The flanking gravity work lines prevented easy access to the down line if there were carton flow problems. The powered decline allowed the use of slaved powered sweep after-sort sweeps while tite-pack skatewheel sweeps were used on the gravity lines.

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Slide 43

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Sort rate Case sizes Mini Maxi Example 3: Design 12 x 12 36 x 30 24 x 24 120

End-of-line operation: Manual pallet building for shipping Gravity accumulation was chosen for the shipping lines, with a belt decline to avoid the speed problem when using gravity chutes. The powered decline allowed the use of slaved powered sweep after-sort sweeps but tite-pack skatewheel sweeps were used to avoid the expense of high-speed sweeps. End-of-line operation: Pack to light operation Powered belt, powered accumulation, and then gravity accumulation / decline was chosen for the PTL lines. The skatewheel sweeps provided a slight buffer to slow-down the sort rate from 120 to ???

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Slide 44

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines

Sort rate Case sizes Mini Maxi Design

65

12 x 12 30 x 24 24 x 24

Example 4:
End-of-line operation: Manual pallet building for shipping No-read and jack-pot line Powered accumulation was chosen for the shipping lines, the system had the height for gravity flow but the product (electronics, television sets, etc.) required controlled accumulation flow. LRPE accumulation with 10 ft. of semi-slug fill mode was used to absorb 5 cartons at the sort rate. Cartons after 5 were recirculated to avoid over stuffing the accumulation line. The 180 degree curve was converted to tite-pack skatewheel. The stop/start of the decline belt would have caused a slave power curve to stop/start with product load not recommended. The decline meters product to the pallet build gravity section. The after-sort sweep is powered because it could be slaved from the live roller.

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Slide 45

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Sort rate Case sizes Mini Maxi Design 12 x 12 30 x 24 24 x 24 65

Example 5:
End-of-line operation: Manual pallet building for shipping Same project as Case Study 4 but actually how the system was installed. The decline gets product down to the floor area quickly. The after-sort sweep is powered because it could be slaved from the decline. Note, the sweep v-belt is pushed by the decline slave. This can create control problems and v-belt failure problems. Powered accumulation was chosen for the palletizing lines, the system had the height for gravity flow but the product (electronics, television sets, etc.) required controlled accumulation flow. The 180 degree curve is slave driven from the decline using a 3-pulley slave unit (instead of a power feeder belt) so the curve v-belt is pulled rather than pushed.

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Slide 46

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Example 6:
Sort rate Case sizes Mini Maxi Design 12 x 12 24 x 18 18 x 18 50 End-of-line operation: Manual pallet building for shipping Gravity accumulation was chosen for the shipping lines, the system had the height for gravity flow and tho easy access was blocked by the flanking gravity, the customer wanted the cost savings of gravity accumulation. Powered declines instead of chutes were used to control the flow of the heavy book boxes. The after-sort lines used the pie chute or the powered sweep. The pie chutes were needed because of the rate (and they are lower cost than an motor driven sweep). The powered sweep was slave driven from a belt conveyor and dictated by the layout.

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Slide 47

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Example 7:
End-of-line operation: Manual pallet building for shipping Gravity accumulation was chosen for the shipping lines, the system had the height for gravity flow and near-by operators if a carton flow problem occurred. Also, there are some 60 down lines to powered conveyors would be prohibitively expensive. Pie chute used because of the sort rate. Trough chute used to center the cases for accumulation. The 20 ft. of gravity accumulation works because the sort rate is distributed over the 60 sort lines. The WMS must provide this distribution by how the orders are picked and packed. Note the carton rotations that occur at this sort rate with the flat face sort arm. Works here because after-sort label orientation is managed by the pallet builder. Sort rate Case sizes Mini Maxi Design 12 x 12 36 x 30 24 x 24 60

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Slide 48

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Example 8:
End-of-line operation: Pick module zone scan, sort, pick Empty carton order start required: LRPE photo-eye accumulation to control heavy and empty cartons Belt sawtooth merges for high-rate, repeatable transfers After-sort lines are powered sweeps, either slaved or motor driven because of the empty cartons and to help maintain label orientation. Coated rollers on after-sort sweeps to insure carton transition. 20 degree divert tracks used with 30 degree after-sort sweeps because of the high rate. Dual line induction used because of the operations layout and also to keep conveyor speeds down (because of the empty cartons). 2 roller centers were used to help the empty carton issues. Sort rate Case sizes Min. Max. Design 12 x 9 24 x 18 21 x 18 120

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Slide 49

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Example 9:
Sort rate
Case sizes Mini Maxi Design 12 x 12 30 x 24 24 x 18

70

End-of-line operation: Fluid loading, floor stack, shipping system Gravity accumulation was chosen for the shipping lines, the system had the height for gravity flow and near-by operators if a carton flow problem occurred. And, the customer needed the cost savings over powered accumulation to fit the system into his budget. A brake belt is provided to hold back the gravity accumulation and also to meter cases into the truck rather than releasing a gravity slug into the truck. Skatewheel after-sort lines are used because there was no adjacent power conveyor to slave a v-belt sweep. The tite-pack skatewheel works very well in this application, but powered sweeps are always better.

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Slide 50

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Sort rate
Case sizes Mini Maxi Design 24 x 24 24 x 24 24 x 24

30

Example 10:
End-of-line operation: Manual carton scan and sort into check/pack work stations Gravity down lines and accumulation was chosen because the sorter was up high for walk-under traffic egress. Skatewheel sweeps were used for the after-sort line. Low cost standard pattern skatewheels were allowed because of the single-size large carton. Flat-bottom chute was used because centering of the cartons for accumulation was not required.

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Slide 51

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Example 11:
End-of-line operation: Manual carton audit work station Gravity accumulation was chosen for these lines because of the low rate, high number of diverts, and the low cost. Skatewheel sweeps were used for the after-sort line.

Sort rate Case sizes Mini

20

12 x 12

Maxi
Design

21 x 15
18 x 15

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Slide 52

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Sort rate
Case sizes Mini Maxi Design 12 x 12 30 x 24 24 x 18

120

Example 12:
End-of-line operation: Fluid loading, floor stack, shipping system LRSA powered accumulation was used because of the overhead location and because of consultant preference. The after-sort sweep is slaved from the powered accumulation conveyor. The 180 degree powered curve is slaved from the belt decline, otherwise slaving from the infeed live roller conveyor would have meant possibly accumulating on a constantly running curve not recommended. Even this slave-from-the-decline arrangement is not recommended since the v-belt curve will stop/start as the decline feeds the truck loading operation. The curve should have been a tite-pack skatewheel turn slightly over pitched to insure flow.

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Slide 53

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines


Sort rate
Case sizes Mini Maxi Design 24 x 24 24 x 24 24 x 24

35

Example 13:
End-of-line operation: Manual pallet building, pallet staging, pallet loading, shipping system Pusher sorting because of the high rate. Layout using parallel power curves required to present the carton side-label to the pallet building person on the right hand or left hand build stations. Both-side sorting allowable because of the large one-size box. Gravity flow after-sort lines used. Initial 20 ft. of pitched gravity, then level gravity to facilitate pallet build operation.

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Slide 54

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Using Gravity Sweeps


Available in 30 and 45 3 Deep 12 GA Frame Steel Skatewheels on Round Axles 18 through 42 Width. The sweep width should be system width + 6 The after-sweep conveyor will be system width The sweep should be ordered with a support kit for narrow conveyor (the after-sweep conveyor) mounting option. Typical Pitch is 10 Wheel pattern is determined by having 5 wheels under the smallest carton. For most systems this results in a tite-pack wheel pattern. However, a tite-pack wheel pattern provides the after-sort flow away from the sorter and the next carton. Order the sweep as a welded one-piece assembly

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Slide 55

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Using Gravity Pie type Chutes

Used on Autosort 4 Flat Face Arm above 45 CPM Typical Pitch 20 Degrees Available in 18 to 36 Nominal Widths 3 Deep 12Ga Frame Note: at rates of 45 cpm and higher, when using the flat face sort arm, carton rotation can occur, especially when sorting square cartons. The use of a pie chute will help straighten out the carton. The use of a trough type straight chute after the pie chute will also help straighten out and center-align cartons before subsequent accumulation. Label orientation is difficult to control due to the carton rotation.

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Slide 56

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Using Powered Sweeps


Available in 30 and 45 18 through 42 Width. The sweep width should be system width + 6 The after-sweep conveyor will be system width The sweep should be ordered with a slave drive module with narrow conveyor (the after-sweep conveyor) mounting option. Variable tangent lengths Can be slaved from a powered takeaway conveyor, or driven with its own motor. Typical Pitch is level Tangent rollers can be skewed to adjust product alignment. Curve rollers cannot be skewed. Reference the sorter information sheets for sweep speed recommendations.

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Slide 57

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Using Gravity Straight Chutes


Typical Pitch 20 Degrees Available in 18 to 36 Nominal Widths 3 Deep 12Ga Frame Used when a rapid elevation change is required and carton orientation is not important.

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Slide 58

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Using Gravity Trough Chutes


Typical Pitch 20 Degrees Available in 18 to 36 Nominal Widths 3 Deep 12Ga Frame Used when a rapid elevation change is required. Centers product to help avoid jams Trick: use a tapered trough chute to adjust your sweep width back down to the system width.

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Slide 59

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Using Gravity Runouts

Typical Pitch 5 Degrees Available in 18 to 36 Nominal Widths Air Brakes can be added to control flow. Typically, the sweep is 6 wider than the system width. For the gravity after the sweep, use the same 6 wider width.

Dont forget to consider your product. Remember this project? The customer used totes instead of cartons. They came down these chutes like a rocket and onto the gravity like a freight train. Not a good thing! The chutes all had to be replaced with belt declines!

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Slide 60

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Using Powered Accumulation


Typically combined with a Belt decline but often chutes are used instead of the belt. Available in 18 to 36 Nominal Widths 6 Deep 10Ga Frame Used To accumulate product prior to a palletizing or fluid loading operation. Note the skewed roller section. Typically, product should be aligned prior to accumulation to maintain orientation and reduce carton flow problems. Gentle handling compared to gravity accumulation.

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Slide 61

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Using Decline Belts


Typical Pitch 18 Degrees Available in 18 to 36 Nominal Widths 5 1/4 Deep 12Ga Frame Used when a rapid elevation change is required, and a chute is not desireable due to product characteristics. Maintains product orientation and gap. Gentle handling compared to chutes. Caution: totes can slide on 18 deg. belt declines. You may need to use16 deg.

What is wrong in this layout?

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Slide 62

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Controlled Flow Gravity Downlines


This is the Automotion version of Controlled Flow Gravity!
10-12 deg. Decline Maximum (1) 60 AutoRoll zone per 10 ft. of gravity roller 20 cpm max. rate 75 lb. totes, 5 lb. totes, various carton size and weights.

Controlled Flow Gravity here solves one problem

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Slide 63

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines AutoRoll Accumulating Downlines


This is another type of accumulating downline using AutoRoll. 13 deg. decline 30 AutoRoll zones, full length of decline. Absorb a slug of 10 totes at 70 cpm, meter out to the pallet build station at 20 cpm. 2 lb. totes to 40 lb. totes.

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Slide 64

Equipment Application: After Sort Lines Speed Rules of Thumb


The Big Questions: 1. Will the after-sort line have to accept cartons at sorter rate? 2. How many cartons in a row will it have to accept? 3. How will you manage a high CPM fill rate and a lower CPM drain rate?
After-sort Conveyor Gravity Sweep or Chute Sorter type Shoe Sorter Belt Sorter Shoe Sorter Speed Rules Speed is not an issue - which is why skatewheel sweeps are frequently used instead of high speed powered sweeps. Sorter speed watch out, for a 100 cpm 350 fpm sorter, the sweep will run 350 fpm or even 410 fpm! Consider an MDR sweep/curve or two speed V-Belt. Case ft./min. X 1.5

Powered Sweep

Powered Sweep

Belt Sorter

Decline Belt

Shoe Sorter Belt Sorter Shoe Sorter Belt Sorter

Case ft./min. x 1.2

Accumulation

See Accumulation Speed Calculations. Fill at sorter rate? How many cartons to a slug? What is the Drain rate?

Commitment to Training

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