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HOW IT IS TRANSFORMING PHARMACEUTICAL AND HEALTHCARE INDUSTRIES

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ROLE OF IT IN HEALTHCARE

Information technology provides many exciting applications for the health sector, such as computer-aided surgery, the use of telesensing methods to examine patients from their homes, and patient/doctor interaction via the internet and digital medical libraries. It can provide the health care sector with unprecedented productivity and quality of care if there is a strategic vision and adequate research to ensure success. Powerful high-end systems provide expert advice based on sophisticated analysis of huge amounts of medical information.

ROLE OF IT IN HEALTHCARE

New communications and monitoring technologies support treatment of patients comfortably from their own homes. Information technology can also help to provide better feedback loops for connecting providers, policymakers, and patients with late-breaking research and discussions about clinical decision-making policy. help us take data from records of individual care and make them available for analysis of populations, both for the generation of new epidemiological knowledge and for the generation of prudent health policy

ROLE OF IT IN HEALTHCARE

Advances in information technology can provide more cost effective monitoring follow-up of patients beyond health care centres dynamic, optimal targeting of specific sectors of the population for screening and early treatment where necessary. Health care organizations currently invest less in IT than in any other information-intensive industry, and current systems are relatively primitive, compared with industries such as banking or aviation.

EXAMPLE

The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) to the phenomenon of physician adoption of electronic medical records (EMR) technology.

CLOUD COMPUTING IN HEALTHCARE

Cloud offers innovative ways to capture, manage, store, and share information with potential cost savings in IT infrastructure and staff.

Academic institutions and private companies see the cloud as a solution to getting cheap, easy access to highperformance computing (HPC) capabilities.

CLOUD COMPUTING IN HEALTHCARE

Pharmaceutical companies, rather than managing server and storage platforms themselves, can outsource those responsibilities to big server companies like Amazon, IBM, Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, and Google.

Companies want to decrease the overall number of data centres they must maintain (thereby slashing IT costs), while simultaneously increasing their computing capacity and their ability to partner with others, like the academic community, during research.

IMPLEMENTING SAAS IN HEALTHCARE

Firms can abandon buying software and implementing it internally, region by region, office by office.
They can instead subscribe to software thats streamed as a ubiquitous feature across their cloud, no matter where someone logs in.

EXAMPLE

Pfizer, has experimented with using the cloud for R&D improvements It has been able to conduct online clinical research with patients. Its also pursued sales and marketing benefits by sending real-time updates via the cloud to reps in the field.

EXAMPLE

Eli Lilly, has a more comprehensive virtualization program, in which it maintains control of some of its data centres and servers but relies on the cloud for the rest of its computing needs. Eli Lilly partnered initially with Amazon. Using Amazons Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) which is not open to the public, Internet lilly has been enjoying the advantages of cloud solutions.

THE PISTOIA ALLIANCE

It was first conceived by informatics experts at AstraZeneca, GSK, Novartis, and Pfizer together attended a meeting in Pistoia, Italy. The founders realized that their organizations were individually tackling the same precompetitive problems:-issues around aggregating, accessing, and sharing data that were essential to innovation, but provide little competitive advantage. They realized that working together to solve these common problems would free their organizations to innovate by enabling them to cut costs and repurpose precious resources to projects with more strategic, competitive impact.

THE PISTOIA ALLIANCE

Hence, The Pistoia Alliance was established as a members organization in 2009. Today, it encompasses Life science companies, academic groups, informatics vendors, and publishers.

Pistoia Alliance members aim to reduce the barriers to innovation by improving the interoperability of R&D business processes through precompetitive collaboration

THE PISTOIA ALLIANCE


It serves to:

Assemble and aggregate common use cases


Facilitate conversation, collaboration, and innovation Incubate and deliver concepts and pilot projects that support precompetitive collaboration Develop and iterate business models for information-based services that reflect the changing life science marketplace and the pressures for innovation

THE PISTOIA ALLIANCE

The Cloud is a focal point for much of the organizations efforts. Its Sequence Services explores the concept of providing next generation gene sequences as a cloud-based service. Everyone in life sciences R&D has to do gene sequencing, data management and analysis of sequence data, and departments need access to data that sits in the public domain during this process. Pistoia hosted a next-generation sequencing challenge called the Sequence Squeeze Competition

REVOLUTIONIZING THE REVENUE CYCLE


Changes that can be made:

The transition to mobile devices at the virtual bedside creates new challenges for connectivity and interoperability. The do better with less mandate suggests rethinking the traditional patient financial services system investment and its ROI.

PLANNING FOR A MORE INTEGRATED HEALTHCARE ECOSYSTEM.

They should anticipate greater integration with payers and new relationships with drug companies and other suppliers. In this converging ecosystem, finance leaders should be consider how to achieve uniformity of reporting, interoperability, and better return on IT investments.

ENABLING MORE EFFICIENT CONNECTIONS WITH PHYSICIAN PRACTICES

When operating as small businesses, physician groups can use cloud-based computing to help avoid building significant internal IT infrastructure.

ACCELERATING EFFECTIVE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN PRIMARY CARE PROVIDERS AND HOME CARE.

Wireless devices can provide real-time data to cloud, where they are captured, and can be used for individual care management and consolidated into a broader database for the practice of evidencebased medicine across the broader population. Finance officers who are grappling with their organizations change initiatives should look to the cloud as a potential game-changer for their IT infrastructure now and for the future. They should take the lead, working closely with IT colleagues, to consider cloud for all IT planning. They should evaluate cloud as they look for new approaches to clinical and financial information systems and business intelligence. They should be ask their systems providers and other consultants if, how, and when cloud can make a difference and how their organization can benefit.