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Chapter 11

Communicating for Results

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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Communication
Communication is the process of transmitting information and meaning. Organizational communication takes place between organizations and among an organizations divisions/departments/ projects/teams. Interpersonal communication takes place between individuals.

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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Vertical & Horizontal


Vertical communication is the downward and upward flow of information through the organization. It is formal communication because it is officially sanctioned transmission of information. Horizontal communication is information shared between peers. Horizontal communication is the coordination that goes on within a department, among team members, and among different departments.

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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Horizontal Communication
Mike and the Mad Dog chewing the fat is horizontal communication with the listener (the audience), which is why their fans love the show so much.

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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Grapevine
The grapevine is the flow of information through informal channels. It is informal communication because it isnt official or sanctioned communication. Unlike many talk show hosts, Mike and the Mad Dog carefully verify the information they receive, and this has paid off handsomely. One reason they are so highly regarded is that fans know they arent dishing out unsubstantiated rumors.
Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning PPT11-5

Communication Process
Sender (the person doing the communicating) encodes the message (puts it into a form the receiver of the message will understand). The sender transmits the message (by talking, phoning, e-mailing, etc.) to the person or group receiving it. The receiver decodes the message (interprets it). The receiver may (or may not) give feedback.

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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Encoding
Mike and the Mad Dog basically encode the content (message) of their show in typical New York workingclass speech, accent, and slang. Why? Because this not only creates the ambience (two guys shooting the breeze in a bar) the producers want listeners to imagine, it also cinches a broad listenership. New Yorkers from Wall Street power brokers to taxi cab drivers have great affection for this accent; it is part of the mystique, and they are very comfortable with it.
Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning PPT11-7

Decoding
Our emotions color how we decode messages. When we are angry, sad, or irrationally attached to an idea, concept, or person, we find it difficult to be objective and to hear the real message. Take the fans who call the Mike and the Mad Dog show. These folks by definition are not exactly objective about their favorite teams and favorite players or teams and players they love to hate and hate to lovethey will hear an honest but negative appraisal as an attack or as anything but the truth.
Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning PPT11-8

Channels for Message Transmittal


Oral Channels: face to face, meetings, presentations, telephone, voice mail. Written Channels: memos, letters, reports, bulletin boards, newsletters, e-mail, faxes, instant messenger. Visual Channels: television, posters.

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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Multiple Channels
Mike and the Mad Dog use multiple channels to distribute their show. The daily radio broadcast is on WFAN and the television broadcast is on the YES network. The show is simultaneously broadcast using both mediums to enrich the experience for viewers.
Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning PPT11-10

Media Richness
Media richness is the amount of information and meaning that the channel can convey. The more information and meaning, the richer the channel.
Face-to-face talk is therefore the richest channel because the full range of oral and nonverbal communication is used. Phone calls are less rich because many nonverbal cues are lost. Written messages can be rich, but they must be very well written to qualify. Television is rich because body language is back in the picture.

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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Feedback
Feedback literally feeds back to the sender the original information/meaning/intent transmitted in the message. Questioning, paraphrasing, and soliciting comments and suggestions are ways senders can check understanding through feedback. Requiring feedback from receivers motivates them to achieve high levels of performance and improves their attention and their retention.
Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning PPT11-12

Message-Receiving Process
The message-receiving process involves listening, analyzing, and checking understanding. To receive the real message the sender is transmitting, you have to do all three. Receiving doesnt end with good listening. Listening is just the beginning.
Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning PPT11-13

Response Styles
Advising Diverting Probing Reassuring Reflecting

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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Criticism
Youre going get some, so you might as well take it well. In fact, if you are wise, you will want it. (How else are you going to realize your full potential?)

Lussier/Kimball, Sport Management, First Edition Copyright 2004, by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning

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