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Maelyne Llanes Madrazo- Cajayon

BSN-RN
 An act of aggression (as one
against a person who resists)
 The property of being wild or
turbulent
 A turbulent state resulting in
injuries and destruction etc.
Domestic Violence
 Also known As partner abuse, spouse
abuse, or family violence, occurs
when one Person uses force to inflict
injury, Either emotional Or physical,
upon another Person. It occurs
between spouses and partners,
parents and children, Grandparents,
and brothers and Sisters.
Definition:
 is a major health and human rights
concern
 According to the WHO, The Declaration on
the Elimination of Violence against
Women (1993) defines violence against
women as "any act of gender-based
violence that results in, or is likely to
result in, physical, sexual or mental harm
or suffering to women, including threats of
such acts, coercion or arbitrary
deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in
public or in private life
FORMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Physical Abuse
 may be a single act
or a series of
different acts
Psychological abuse

 Refers to acts of
omissions causing or
likely to cause
mental or emotional
suffering of the
victim such as but
not limited to
intimidation,
harassment,
stalking, damage to
property, public
ridicule or
humiliation, repeated
verbal abuse and
marital infidelity
Verbal Abuse
 Use to humiliates
and destroys the
self-esteem of the
victim
Sexual Abuse
 Being demanding
against the victim’s
will and forcing her
to perform acts
that are not
acceptable to her
Economic Abuse

 uses denial or
withdrawal of
financial support
 Destroy household
property
 Controlling victims
own money or
properties or solely
controlling the
conjugal properties
Social Abuse
Types:
 Isolation
 Public Humiliation
Child Abuse
Child neglect
 neglect can be physical in nature
(abandonment, failure to seek needed
health care) educational (failure to
see that a child is attending school)
emotional ( abuse of a spouse or
another child in the child’s presence;
allowing a child to witness adult
substance abuse)

Elder

abus
SPOUSE ABUSE
 spouse or partner abuse is
commonly termed “domestic
violence” While it is a crime
penetrated by both genders,
it is a crime whose victims
are primarily women and
often children.
BATTERED WIFE:

 it is a recognized
psychological
condition to
describe woman
who becomes
depressed and
unable to take any
independent
action that would
allow her to
escape the abuse
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BATTERY

 An intentional
touching of
another’s body
without the other’s
consent
(Saunders)
ASSAULT

 Occurs when a
person puts
another person in
fear of a harmful
or offensive
contact

 The victim fears


and believes that
harm will result as
a result of a threat
 Sexual Assault
 Any physical contact of a sexual nature without voluntary
consent
 US Department of Health and Human Services includes :
 inappropriate touching,
 anal and oral penetration,
 sexual intercourse,
 Rape
 Attempted rape
 Child molestation
 isa crime where the victim is forced into
sexual activity, in particular sexual
penetration, against his or her will.
 rape occurs when sex is non-consensual (not
agreed upon), or a person forces another
person to have sex against his or her will.
 The victim is not required by law to report
rape or assault
PERPETRATORS
 In the United States one in three (1:3)
women and one in seven (1:7) men will be
sexually assaulted in her/his lifetime.
 As of 2006, Rape continued to be a
problem, with most cases going
unreported. During the year, the PNP
reported 685 rape cases
 for every 3 Filipino children, one child
experiences abuse.
♥ Violent Rape
-when violence beyond the rape itself
is a part of the assault.

♥ Statutory Rape
-any sexual contact with a minor even
if he or she agrees to the sexual activity.
♥ Acquaintance (“date”) Rape
-between people who are already
acquainted, or who know each other socially

♥ Spousal Rape
-is also called marital rape, wife rape,
partner rape or intimate partner sexual assault
(IPSA).
♥ Group Rape
-also known as “gang rape” or “pack rape”.
-a group of people participate in the rape of a
single victim.

♥ Gray Rape
-victim is unable to demonstrate non-consent
although he or she expresses displeasure at the
encounter.
 Power-assertive rapist
-wishing to be an alpha male

 Power-reassurance rapist
-“gentleman rapist”

 Anger-retaliatory rapist
- often a substance abuser, with
impulsive behavior and anger-related
pathologies.
 Anger-excitation rapist
-considered the most dangerous and elusive
-often sadistic
 Facilitators
-women who intentionally aid men in
gaining access to children for sexual
purposes.

 Reluctant partners
-women in long term relationships who
go along with the sexual exploitation of a
minor out of fear of being abandoned
 Initiating
partners
-women who want to sexually offend against a
child

 Seducersand lovers
-women who direct their sexual interest
adolescents and develop an intense attachment
 Pedophiles

-desire and exclusive and sustained sexual


relationship with a child

 Psychotics

-suffer from a mental illness and who have


inappropriate sexual contact with children as a
result
 There are no hard and fast, right or wrong
answers to handle an attacker (National Crime
Prevention Council (NCPC) explains)
 It depends on your emotional state and physical
state, the situation, and the attacker’s
personality. Surviving is the goal, but NCPC
recommends the following:
INTERVENTIONS
1. Obtain the date of the LMP
2. Determine form of birth control used and
last act of intercourse before rape
3. Duration of intercourse, orifices violated,
and penile penetration
4. Use of condom by perpetuator
5. Shame, embarrassment and humiliation
6. Anger and revenge
7. Fear of telling others for fear of not being
believe
1. Sleep disturbance, nightmares
2. Loss of appetite
3. Fears, anxiety, phobias, suspicion
4. Decrease in activities and motivation
5. Disruptions in relationships with partner,
family, friends
6. Self-blame, guilt and shame
7. Lowered self-esteem, feelings of
worthlessness
8. Somatic complaints
 Attraction to men

 Consensual sex later in life

 Flashbacks (re-living the rape in your mind)

 Nightmares
ABUSE can be physical, sexual,
psychological or financial
Victims may attempt to dismiss injuries
as accidental, and abusers may
prevent victims from receiving proper
medical care to avoid discovery
Victims are often socially isolated
Victims may be care providers for the
abusers
Neglect can include
unintentional failure to care
for the elderly person’s needs
or an intentional neglect, such
as abandonment
PHYSICAL ABUSE
2. Fractures

3. Lacerations

4. Punctures

5. Bruises

6. Burns
2. SEXUAL ABUSE
b. Torn or stained
underclothing
c. Discomfort or
bleeding in the
genital area
d. Difficulty in walking
and sitting
e. Unexplained genital
infections or disease
1. Confusion
2. Fearful and
agitated
3. Changes in
appetite and
weight
4. Withdrawn and loss
of interest in self
and social
activities
Asan na
ang pera Fearful when
ko ??? discussing finances
Confused,
inaccurate, or no
knowledge about
finances
Inability to pay bills
Dishevelled
appearance
Dehydration and
malnutrition
Dressed
inadequately or
inappropriately
Lacking physical
needs, such as
glasses, hearing
aids and dentures
Skin breaks
Signs of medication
overdose
Unexplained bruises, cuts, burns,
sprains, or fractures in various stages
of healing
Bedsores or frozen joints
Unexplained venereal disease or
genital infections; vaginal or anal
bleeding; torn, stained, or bloody
underclothing
Sudden changes in behavior
Staff refusing to allow visitors to see
resident or delays in allowing visitors to
Staff not allowing resident to be
alone with visitor
Resident being kept in an over-
medicated state
Loss of resident's possessions
Sudden large withdrawals from bank
accounts or changes in banking
practices
Abrupt changes in will or other
financial documents
Report cases of suspected abuse
Assess for physical injuries
Assist with providing care to treat
physical injuries
Assist with legal procedures, such as
police reports, order of protection and
court-ordered counselling
Explore alternative living
arrangements that are least
restrictive and disruptive to the
victim
Assist in financial management
protection
Encourage counselling and provide
referrals to emergency community
resources
Refer to protective services for adults
Arrange counselling and treatment
CYCLE OF VIOLENCE

Leonore Walker
a sequence of male spouses
battering
It describes the aggression that
intensifies in degree and
frequency over time and holds the
people involved in an
Child Abuse
 intentional acts that result in
physical or emotional harm to
children. The term child abuse
covers a wide range of behavior,
from actual physical assault by
parents or other adult caretakers
to neglect of a child’s basic
needs. Child abuse is also
sometimes called child
maltreatment
TYPES OF CHILD ABUSE

Physical abuse - includes


deliberate acts of violence that
injure or even kill a child.
 Unexplained bruises, broken
bones, or burn marks on a child
may be signs of physical
TYPES OF CHILD ABUSE

2. Sexual abuse - occurs when


adults use children for sexual
gratification or expose them to
sexual activities.
Sexual abuse may begin with
kissing or fondling and progress
to more intrusive sexual acts,
such as oral sex and vaginal or
anal
TYPES OF CHILD ABUSE

3. Emotional abuse - destroys a


child’s self-esteem. Such abuse
commonly includes repeated
verbal abuse of a child in the
form of shouting, threats, and
degrading or humiliating
criticism.
EFFECTS ON CHILDREN
psychiatric disorders like
depression, excessive anxiety, or
dissociative identity disorder, as
well as an increased risk of
suicide.
behavior problems often develop
after abuse, including violence
and juvenile crime.
EFFECTS ON CHILDREN
Children who are sexually abused
initially may show an unusual interest in
sexual organs. They may demonstrate
abnormal behavior, such as public
masturbation or public display of their
genitals.
Long-term effects may include
depression, low self-esteem, and sexual
problems, such as avoidance of sexual
contact, confusion about sexuality, or
involvement in prostitution.
Effect in the parent and child:

◦ Rarely touch or look each other;

◦ Consider their relationship entirely


negative;

◦ State that they do not like each other.


Risk Factors and behavioral indicators
of an abused child:
Shows sudden changes in behavior
and school performances;
Has not received help for physical or
medical problems;
Has learning problems;
Its always watchful, as though
preparing for something bad to
happen;
Lacks of adult supervision;
Is overly compliant, an overachiever
or too responsible;
It comes to school early, stays late,
and does not want to go home;
Has unexplained burns, bites,
bruises, broken bones or black eyes;
Has fading bruises or other marks;
Seems frightened of the parents and
protests or cries when it is time to go
home from school;
Shrinks at the approach of adults; or
Reports injury by a parent or another
adult caregiver.
Characterization and behavioral
indicators of abusing parents:

◦ Shows little concern for the child;


◦ Denies the existence of the child;
◦ Asks the classroom teacher to use harsh
physical discipline if the child misbehave;
◦ Sees the child entirely bad, worthless, or
burdensome;
◦ Demands the perfection or a level of
physical or academic performance the
child cannot achieve.
CARE OF ABUSED
CHILDREN
(1) separate the child from the
parents and place him or her with
a relative, foster home, or state
institution, or
(2) keep the child with the parents
and provide the family with social
support, such as counseling, food
stamps, and child-care services.
L
aws
Section 31. Healthcare
provider Response to Abuse
a) Properly document any of the
victims physical, emotional or
psychological injuries
b) Properly record any of victim’s
suspicions, observations and
circumstances of the
examination or visit
c) Automatically provide the victim
free of charge a medical
certificate concerning the
examination or visit
d) Safeguard the records and make
them available to the victim upon
request at actual cost; and
e) Provide the victim immediate
and adequate notice of rights and
remedies provided under this Act,
and services available to them
Section 6 Penalties
Imprisonment and a fine in the
amount of not less than
100,000.00 but nor more than
300,000.00
Undergo mandatory
psychological counselling or
psychiatric treatment and shall
report compliance to court
Healthy Roads Media.flv
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