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Lean Manufacturing And Its

Implementation In Automotive
Industry
By:
Shenoy Nitesh K M
B070323ME
Faculty Guide:
Mr. Vinay Panicker
Asst. Professor
Agenda
Introduction To Lean Manufacturing
History Of Lean
Introduce Key Concepts of Lean Manufacturing
Tools:
Kanban
Poka-Yoke
5S
Value Stream Mapping
Conclusion

Craft Manufacturing
Late 1800s
Car built on blocks in the barn as workers walked
around the car.
Built by craftsmen with pride
Components hand-crafted, hand-fitted
Excellent quality
Very expensive
Few produced
Timeline of Manufacturing:
Mass Manufacturing
Assembly line - Henry Ford 1920s
Low skilled labor, simplistic jobs,
no pride in work
Interchangeable parts
Lower quality
Affordably priced for the average family
Billions produced - identical
Timeline of Manufacturing:
Lean Manufacturing
Cells or flexible assembly lines
Broader jobs, highly skilled
workers, proud of product
Interchangeable parts,
even more variety
Excellent quality mandatory
Costs being decreased through process
improvements.
Global markets and competition.
Timeline of Manufacturing:
What is Lean?
"Lean," is a production practice that considers
the expenditure of resources for any goal
other than the creation of value for the end
customer to be wasteful, and thus a target for
elimination.
Working from the perspective of the customer
who consumes a product or service, "value" is
defined as any action or process that a
customer would be willing to pay for.
What is Waste?
Three types:
Muda- Doesnt add value to the product
Muri- overburden, unreasonableness or
absurdity
Mura- unevenness, inconsistency
Seven Deadly Wastes:
Transport: Inventory:
Motion:
Waiting:
Overproduction: Over Processing:
Defects:
Types
of
Waste
CORRECTION
WAITING
PROCESSING
MOTION
INVENTORY
CONVEYANCE
OVERPRODUCTION
Repair or
Rework
Any wasted motion
to pick up parts or
stack parts. Also
wasted walking
Wasted effort to transport
materials, parts, or
finished goods into or
out of storage, or
between
processes.
Producing more
than is needed
before it is needed
Maintaining excess
inventory of raw matls,
parts in process, or
finished goods.
Doing more work than
is necessary
Any non-work time
waiting for tools,
supplies, parts, etc..
History Of Lean:
Fords Manufacturing Of Model-T

Japan in post WW2 economy

Taichii Ohno and TPS(Toyota Production
System)

POKA YOKE
INADVERTANT
ERROR
YOKURE
(TO AVOID)

MISTAKE PROOFING
Tools Of Lean:
INATTENTION
ERROR
CAUSES
EFFECTS
DISTRACTION
CONFUSION
LACK OF
PRACTICE
UNCERTAINTY
DEFECTS
(QUALITY)
INSUFFICIENT
NUMBER
(QUANTITY)
ACCIDENTS
(SAFETY)
WORK DELAY
DETECTION DEVICES
LVDT
VERTICAL POTENTIOMETER
LIMIT
SWITCH
PRESSURE
SWITCH
MICRO
SWITCH
CONTACT
TYPE
PHOTO
SWITCH
PROXIMITY
SWITCH
ELECTRONIC
EYE /
VIDEO CAMERA
NON CONTACT
TYPE
AUDIO
( BUZZER )
VISUAL
( BLINKERS )
( INDICATING LAMP)
ALARMS
DETECTION
DEVICES
Examples:
This pen prevents ruining shirts by retracting the tip
automatically when the pen is clipped into your shirt pocket.
The catch that keeps the tip out is actually in the pocket clip.
When you pullout on the clip to put it on your shirt, the pin
that engages the catch is released causing the tip to retract.
Example:
This star-shaped, clear-plastic wheel effectively checks the orientation of the
cups that pass beneath it. If any cups are upside down, the solid bottom
prevents the wheel from turning, bringing the flow of cups to an abrupt
halt.

5S: What Are They?
Seiri - Sorting
Seiton - Systematic Arrangement
Seiso - Cleaning
Seiketsu - Standardization
Shitsuke - Training & Discipline


AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR
5 S
Equipments
Material
Jigs / Tools
Methods
Workers
Products
Timeliness
QUALITY
SAFETY
EFFICIENCY
CONTROL
CUSTOMER
SATISFACTION
EMPLOYEE
SATISFACTION
TO CLEARLY DIVIDE OBJECTS INTO TWO GROUPS
- THOSE ITEMS THAT ARE NECESSARY.
- AND THOSE ITEMS THAT ARE NOT NECESSARY.
TO GET RID OF THE UNNECESSARY
AND TO KEEP THE NECESSARY
How to achieve Systematic Arrangement ?

Decide where things belong

Decide how things should be put away

Obey the Put away rules
Clean workplace completely so that there is no dust
on the floor, machines and Equipments
Activity - Keep workplace spotlessly clean
- Inspection while cleaning
- Finding minor problems with cleaning
inspection
Success - Reduction in machine down time
Indicator - Reduction in no. of accidents
Setting up Standards / Norms for a Neat & Clean
workplace and details of how to maintain the Norms
(Procedure)
Activity - Innovative visual management
- Colour coding
- Early detection of problem and early action

We need everyone to maintain 5S
guidelines.

To maintain DISCIPLINE, we need
to practice and repeat until it
becomes a way of life.

Discipline is the Core of 5S
Design Raw Materials
Assembly Plants
Distribution
Customer
Parts Manufacturing
Value Stream Mapping:
A Value Stream includes all elements (both value added and non-value added)
that occur to a given product from its inception through delivery to the customer.
Requirements
VALUE STREAM
PROCESS
Assembly
Cell
PROCESS
Welding
PROCESS
Stamping
Finished
Product
Raw
Material
Typically we examine the value stream from raw
materials to finished goods within a plant.
It is also possible to map business processes
using Value Stream Mapping.
Value Stream Mapping (VSM) is a hands-on process to create a graphical
representation of the process, material and information flows within a value
stream.

Finished Goods Assembly
Layout
Welding
6 x / Day
PC & L
Daily
Level Box
DA1
DA2
DA3
C/O Time =
CT =
TAKT Time
3 Shifts
DT =
Scrap =
Stamping
0 Overtime
2 Shifts
Max Size
# Material Handlers
C/O Time =
CT =
TAKT Time
3 Shifts
DT =
Scrap / Rework =
C/O Time =
CT =
TAKT Time
3 Shifts
DT =
Scrap / Rework=
Small Lot # Operators
Customer
X pcs / month
Std Pack Qty
# Shifts
WIP =
WIP = WIP =
Steel Supplier
Inv .Time
Proc .Time
TPc /t = ?
? days ? days ? days ? days
? days ? days ? days
Future State Material, Information and Process Flows
with total Product Cycle Time
Provide the means to see the material, process
and information flows.
Support the prioritization of continuous
improvement activities at the value stream
Provide the basis for facility layout
Eliminate Waste
AND...
Kanban:

Just-In-Time-
What you Need
When you Need it
Exact amount you Need
Defined by the customer
Momos At Mini Canteen
Pizza Corner,Kettangel
Push Systems:
Push:
Working in anticipation of demand
Maximize machine uptime
Local Efficiency

Disadvantages:
Undisciplined
High Waste
Low-Cost, High Volume
Pull:
Disciplined
Low Waste
High customization/Low Volume

Types Of Pull:
FIFO Pull
Supermarket Pull
Hybrid

Customer Demand V/S Supply:
How then will you achieve JIT?
By utilizing Kanban:
Japanese- Signboard or Billboard
Production, Conveyance, Inventory Control
Pulling, Pacing, Sequencing
Basic Types:

Visual Pull:
Proximity to next station


Bins:
Distance from replenishment
Small consumables
Bins:
Part Number
Photo
To Location
From Location
Quantity
Example Of A 3-Bin Kanban System
Conclusion:
Learning is not compulsory... neither is
survival.
-E. Deming
References:
Womack, James P.; Daniel T. Jones, and Daniel Roos (1990), The
Machine That Changed the World, Rawson Associates

Ohno, Taiichi (1988). Toyota Production System. Productivity
Press.

Askin, Ronald; Goldberg, Jeffery (2002); Design And Analysis Of
Lean Production Systems, John Wiley And Sons.

Toyota Production Systems
http://www.simpleximprovement.com
(As seen on 09/02/11)
Thank You