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What are adjectives?

Adjectives are used to describe nouns or


p.
They give more details or information
about the nouns they are associated
with.
Example:
A: Tell me about your boyfriend
B: Well, he is tall, dark, and handsome.
A: Sounds like mine.

Adjectives can be used to answer the questions
"What kind (of) ?" or "Which one?"
Examples:
A: Hi. I'm calling about the car you're selling?
B: It's a great car. (It's) in excellent condition.
A: What kind of seats does it have?
B: They're very comfortable seats, (soft, plush, just
like a sofa.)
A: Uh. I think I'll sleep on it.
A: Hand me a book.
B: Which one do you want?
A: The red book. The red one.

Adjectives come before the nouns they
modify (not after).

Example:

Three happy hippies lived in the Heartquake Hotel. ()

Three hippies happy lived in the Heartquake Hotel. (X)








Adjectives can also be used with linking
verbs to describe the subject of a
sentence.
When used in this manner, the
adjective(s) come after the linking verb.
Example:
My mother is tall and slender. ()
My mother tall and slender. (No linking verb.) (X)

Seem, become, appear, and verbs of
perception can also be used as linking
verbs.
Can you identify the linking verbs and the
adjectives?
Examples:
The journey seemed long. (It appeared strenuous
and boring.)

Adjectives are the same for all nouns.
They do not change for plurals.

Example:

Three tired tigers tried to tie a triangular tie. ()
Not: three "tireds" tigers (X)


You can recognise many adjectives from their
endings.
-y wealthy bulky risky
-ly costly timely quarterly
-al professional continental promotional
-ial influential industrial secretarial
-ous famous dangerous ambitious
-ary momentary voluntary supplementary

Continues.
-ic strategic economic dramatic
-less powerless useless cashless
-ful successful careful skilful
-ive competitive exclusive attractive
-ent confident convenient urgent
-ant important pleasant dominant
-ible negligible deductible legible
-able payable profitable adjustable
-ing leading growing promising
-ed limited recommended expected
1. Adjectives can be used in two ways. Before
nouns:
An excessive price
a successful project
An insurmountable problem
a satisfied customer
After verbs such as:
- To be to seem to appear

- The price seemed excessive.
The problem is insurmountable.
The project was successful.
The customer appeared satisfied.
1. The first thing you have to do is to decide whether the
adjectives are expressing opinion or fact.

2. Adjectives of opinion come before adjectives of fact. For
example:


He is a nice old man.
He has got a wonderful new car.
Azman is a silly young man.
That friendly old lady is a good company.

3. Now the adjectives describing facts can be
divided into types. The order of fact adjectives is
on the following page:



Determiner Opinion Size,
Length,
Shape,
Width.
Age Colour Origin Material Purpose Noun
A beautiful old Italian sports car
An expensive antique silver mirror
Four gorgeous red plastic roses
Her big old black dog
Those square wooden hat boxes
That dilapidate
d
little village house
Several enormous young England football players
Some delicious Thai cuisine
Boring is the effect that something or
someone has on a person. Bored is how
the person feels about it.
The ing adjective talks about the effect
it has on me.
The ed adjective describes my feelings,

The film was very boring.
I was quite bored.

English is a confusing language,
I often feel confused.

My English lessons are very interesting.
I am very interested in English.
Adjective Comparative Superlative
One-syllable
words
Tall Taller Tallest
Two-syllable
words ending in y,
-er, -ow, -le,
etc
Pretty
Clever
shallow
simple
Prettier
Cleverer
shallower
simpler
Prettiest
Cleverest
Shallowest
simplest
1. Note how the comparative and superlative
forms of regular and irregular adjectives are
formed in the example.
REGULAR ADJECTIVES


ADJECTIVE COMPARATIVE SUPERLATIVE
Much
Many
Little
Good
bad
More
More
Less
Better
worse
The most
The most
The least
The best
The worst
IRREGULAR ADJECTIVES

Countable Uncountable
Managers
People
Partner
e-mail
Time
Money
Progress
Advice
1. You must decide whether the noun you are
describing is countable or uncountable. The
table below shows some examples of
countable and uncountable nouns.

With countable nouns With uncountable
nouns
Many
Few, a few
Fewer
Much
Little, a little
Less/ the least


The End