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ORGANIZATIONAL

CULTURE


- SUBMITTED BY
SUNAYANA SUKALI
POONAM SINGH
SOUNDARYA MANOHAR
POOJA AWAGHADE
BHAGYSHREE

WHAT IS ORGANIZATIONAL CULURE?
Organizational Culture refers to a common
perception held by the organizations members; a
system of shared meaning.
CHARACTERISTICS:
Innovation and risk taking
Attention to detail
Outcome orientation
People orientation
Team orientation
Aggressiveness
Stability
TYPES OF ORGANISATION CULTURE

The Clan Culture:
- A very friendly place to work where people share a
lot of themselves. It is like an extended family.

The Hierarchy Culture:
- A very formalized structured place to work.
- A very formalized structured place to work.


TYPES OF ORGANISATION CULTURE

The Adhocracy Culture:
- A dynamic entrepreneurial, and creative place to
work. People stick their necks out and take risks.

The Market Culture:
- A results oriented organization whose major
concern is with getting the job done.
- People are competitive and goal-oriented.

WHAT DO CULTURES DO?
FUNCTIONS:
Boundary defining role
Sense of Identity
Commitment
Social Stability
Control Mechanism

WHAT DO CULTURES DO?


CULTURE AS A LIABILITY:
Barrier to Change
Barrier to Diversity
Barrier to Acquisitions and Mergers

CREATING AND SUSTAINING
CULTURE

HOW A CULTURE BEGINS?
The Founders
Founders hire and keep only employees who think and
feel the same way they do.
They indoctrinate and socialize these employees to their
way of thinking and feeling.
Finally, the founders own behavior acts as a role model
that encourages employees to identify with them and
thereby internalize their beliefs, values, and assumptions.

CREATING AND SUSTAINING
CULTURE

KEEP CULTURE ALIVE:
Selection
Concern with how well the candidates will fit into the
organization.
Provides information to candidates about the organization.
Top Management
Senior executives help establish behavioral norms that are
adopted by the organization.
Socialization
The process that helps new employees adapt to the organizations
culture.

STAGES IN SOCIALIZATION
PROCESS




HOW EMPOLYEES LEARN CULTURE:

Culture is transmitted to employees in a number of
forms, the most potent being stories, rituals,
materials symbols, and language.

Stories: Stories such as these typically contain a
narrative of events about the organizations
founders, rule breaking, rags-to-riches successes,
reductions in the workforce, relocation of employees,
reactions to past mistakes, and organizational
coping. They anchor the present in the past and
provide explanations and legitimacy for current
practices. For the most part, these stories develop
spontaneously. Some organizations actually try to
manage this element of culture learning.
HOW EMPLOYEES LEARN CULTURE
Example: Nordstrom employees are fond of the story
when Mr. Nordstrom instructed the clerk to take the tires
back and provide a full cash refund. After the customer had
received his refund and left, the perplexed clerk looked at
the boss. But, Mr. Nordstrom, we dont sell tires!, I
know, replied the boss, but we do whatever we need to do
to make the customer happy.
Nordstrom is known for its personal customer service.
Nordstrom prides itself on its professional sales staff, which
provides individualized customer service.

Rituals: Rituals are repetitive sequences of activities that
express and reinforce the key values of the organization,
what goals are most important, which people are
important, and which are expendable.

HOW EMPLOYEES LEARN CULTURE
Material Symbols: Symbols are an important tool
of communicating organizational culture. These
symbols are often material objects but they convey
meanings that go beyond its face value.Others
provide fewer and less elaborate perks. These
material symbols convey to employees who is
important, the degree egalitarianism desired by top
management, the kinds of behavior that are
appropriate.

HOW EMPLOYEES LEARN CULTURE
Language: Many organizations and units use
language as a way to identify members of a culture or
subculture. By learning this language, members
attest to their acceptance of the culture and help to
preserve it. Organizations, over time, often develop
unique terms to describe equipment, offices, key
personnel, or products that relate to its business.
Once assimilated, this terminology acts as a common
denominator that unites members of a given culture
or subculture.
CONCLUSIONS
Changing an organizations culture may be
extremely difficult, as the processes that support a
particular organization or a departmental method of
working are both interrelated and varied.
Organizational culture is self-perpetuating and
highly resistant to change. Changes may cause
confusion, conflict and resistance. Managers need to
understand the nature and role of culture. When the
role of culture is more clearly defined, managers can
better understand its importance in managing
organizational change and its impact on day-to-day
decision-making.