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Physical Science-

5.2.8.B.1 , 5.2.8.B.2
Physical Science- 5.2.8.B.1 ,
5.2.8.B.2

10/8/14
Do Now: When water changes from solid to liquid to gas, is
the mass of the water ZERO? Could I gather it all back
together?

Objective: SWBAT understand the Law of Conservation of
Mass

Weve talked about changes
in matter
The evaporation of a puddle of water
Rust forming on a metal fence

The Law of Conservation of
Mass
In the late eighteenth century, Antoine
Lavoisier, a French chemist, recognized
the importance of accurate
measurements. He extensively studied
and explained the nature of combustion.
He found out that combustion involved
reaction with oxygen.
Law of Conservation of Mass
Total mass of reactants
=
Total mass of products Antoine Lavoisier
Mass is neither
created nor
destroyed during
chemical or physical
reactions.
Just like we did with the vinegar and
baking soda in a balloon!
We measured the mass of the reactants
(vinegar and baking soda) and then, after
the reaction took place, we measured the
mass of the products (reactants + carbon
dioxide)
The Law of
Conservation of Matter
So we know that during a chemical reaction, matter
cannot be created or destroyed.

Even though the matter may change from one state of
matter to another(from liquid-solid, gas) (or just liquid to
gas), the same number of atoms exists before and after
the change takes place!
Since the overall mass of the
matter does not change
The mass of the reactants the substances there
before the reaction occurs must equal the mass of the
product the substances there after the reaction takes
place.
Mass of
Reactants
Mass of
Products
=
CHEMICAL REACTION
sodium metal + chlorine gas ---- table salt
(sodium chloride)
10/9/14
Do Now: What is an example of a reactant and a
product? Think back to our lab

Objective: SWBATunderstand the Law of Conservation
of Mass


Fe Fe
Fe Fe
O
2
O
2
O
2
Fe
2
O
3
Fe
2
O
3
TAKE A
LOOK AT
THE
NUMBERS
How many Iron
molecules?
How many
Oxygen
molecules?
What about
the PRODUCT?
The same number of each kind of atom must be on the left side of
the arrow as are on the right side when an equation is balanced.
Al
Al
Al
Al
O O
O O
O O
Al Al O O O
Al Al O O O
Oxygen, as a product, must be multiplied by 2.
A coefficient is placed in front of the
compounds that contains O.

Oxygen
atoms are =
When a coefficient is added you must multiply
all atoms in the compound by this number.
Redo the inventory
After redoing the inventory, add coefficients
to balanced other atoms. With each additional
coefficient the inventory must be updated.
Oxygen
atoms are
Hydogen
atoms are =
2 H atoms 2 H atoms
2 O atoms 1 O atom
Hydogen
atoms are
Oxygen
atoms are =
First: Inventory the atoms on both sides of the
yield arrow



Balancing an equation:
H
2
+ O
2
H
2
O
H
H
H
O
O
O
H
Second: Determine which atoms are not equal and
add coefficients to balance these atoms.
2
4 H atoms
2 O atoms
2
4 H atoms
2 O atoms
Hydogen
atoms are =
This is now a balanced equation
So: Chemical equations are balanced, when the numbers and
kinds of atoms on each side of the reaction arrow are equal.
H
H
H
H
O
O
Reactants
Products
H
H
H
H
O
O
4 Hydrogen 4 Hydrogen
2 Oxygen 2 Oxygen
Because atoms are conserved, the mass of
the reactants in the chemical reaction is
equal to the mass of the products.
H
2
+ F
2
2 HF

2g + 38g = 2( 20g)
40g = 40g
40 g 40 g
Reactants Products
H H F F
H F H F


If 27.0 g of mercuric oxide (the red solid compound) is
heated and completely decomposes to give the elements
oxygen and mercury. 2.0 g of oxygen are produced. How
many grams of mercury are produced?

mercuric oxide mercury + oxygen
HgO Hg + O
Reactants Products
27.0 g
HgO
? g Hg
2.0 g O
27 g HgO = 2 g O + ? Hg =
25 g Hg
Mg + HCl MgCl
2
+ H
2


When the above equation is balanced, the coefficient for
hydrogen chloride is
A 0
B 1
C 2
D 4

Mg + 2HCl MgCl
2
+ H
2


The correct
answer is C
Which of the following chemical reactions
indicate that mass in conserved?
A. Mg + Cl
2
2 MgCl
B. 2 Ca + O
2
2 CaO
C. Zn + S 2 ZnS
D. C + O
2
2 CO
The correct answer is B
Ca
Ca
O
O
O
O
Ca
Ca
Because atoms must be equal on each side
of the equation:
Determining the Mass of
Reactants and Products
REMEMBER: The mass of the reactants is always equal to
the mass of the products.
Mass of
Reactants
Mass of
Products
Example: Tin Fluoride
Tin + hydrogen fluoride -> tin fluoride +
hydrogen




Whats the total mass of the reactants?
158.72 g

So what should the mass of the products be?
158.72 g

1
1
8
.
7

g

4
0
.
0
2

g

Total Mass of Reactants:
158.72 g
Tin + hydrogen fluoride -> tin fluoride + hydrogen





If we know the mass of the tin fluoride, can we figure out how
much hydrogen was produced?
Subtract the mass of one product from the total mass.
Suppose 100 g of iron metal, becomes rusty. We weigh the rust and find that the
rust has a mass of 143 g. What mass of oxygen reacted with the iron?

A. 243 g
B. 57 g
C. 100 g
D 43 g
Iron + Oxygen Rust
100 g + ?g 143g
What mass of
oxygen is needed?

43 g Oxygen Choice D