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A Brief Study on Rivet and Riveted Joints

Group Presentation By

Deep Prakash Bhagat Kumar Nishant Gupta Saanchi Jain Yamini Mathur Pranshu Sharma

What is Rivet

A rivet is a round rod of circular cross section. It consist of two parts HEAD and SHANK.

What is Rivet • A rivet is a round rod of circular cross section. It consist

Metals Commonly used for rivets are mild steel, wrought Iron, Copper and Aluminium alloys etc.

What is Riveting ?

Riveting is the process of forming a riveted

joint. For this, a rivet is first placed in the

whole drill through the two parts to be joint

then the shank end is made into a rivet

head by applying pressure.

Process of Riveting

Process of Riveting

Caulking and Fullering

Caulking and Fullering Caulking: Operation of burring down the edges of the plates and heads of

Caulking: Operation of burring down the edges of the plates and heads of the rivets to form a metal to metal joint

Fullering is a better option

TYPES OF RIVET HEADS

Indian standard heads for general purposes(length of shank=2.5D to 10 D )

(see:1929 and :2155 for preffered length combination)

Types of Riveted Joints

There are two types of riveted joints.

  • 1. Riveted Lap Joint :- In lap Joints one plate overlaps the other and in

drawing are shown in different planes. All the rivet pass through both plates. The Joint is known as

single riveted. If there is one row of

rivets then it is called single riveted. If there are two rows of rivets then it is called double riveted.

Rivet

Rivet location

Lap joint

(a): Single

rivet lap joint

Rivets

b): Double riveted l(lap joint, chain

Riveted butt Joint :- In butt joints ends of the main plates butt up against each other and may be considered as lying in

the same plane. One or two

strap or cover plates are placed over the joint and riveted to each plate. If there is one cover

plate it is known as single strap

butt joint and if there are two

cover plate it is known as double strap butt joint.

Butt Joints are stronger than lap Joints and are generally

Used for joining thick plates

• Riveted butt Joint :- In butt joints ends of the main plates butt up against

Butt joint

• Riveted butt Joint :- In butt joints ends of the main plates butt up against

Use of Rivets :-

Rivets joints are permanent fastenings and riveting is one of the commonly used method of producing rigid and permanent joints.

Manufacturing of boilers, storage tanks, etc.

These joints are also used to fasten rolled steel sections in structural works, such as bridge and roof trusses.

Important Terms Used in Riveted Joints

The following terms in connection with the riveted joints are important from the subject point of view :

  • 1. Pitch. It is the distance from the centre of one rivet to the centre of the next rivet measured parallel to the seam as shown in Fig. It is usually denoted by p.

  • 2. Transverse pitch. It is the perpendicular distance between the centre lines of the successive rows as shown in Fig. It is usually denoted by pt

  • 3. Diagonal pitch. It is the distance between the centres of the rivets in adjacent rows of zig-zag riveted joint as shown in Fig. It is usually denoted by pd.

  • 4. Margin or marginal pitch. It is the distance between the centre of rivet hole to the nearest edge of the plate as shown in Fig. It is usually denoted by m.

CASES OF FALIURE OF RIVETS

Under tensile strength or tearing resistance of plate per pitch. P(t) = (p-d)*t*f(t)

CASES OF FALIURE OF RIVETS • Under tensile strength or tearing resistance of plate per pitch.

Where, P = Tearing resistance of plate per pitch p = Pitch t = Thickness of plate f(t) = permissible tearing strength

CASES OF FALIURE OF RIVETS

Under shearing resistance of plate per pitch Rivet resistance to shear = (∏/4)d*d*f(s) P(s) = (∏/4)d*d*f(s)

CASES OF FALIURE OF RIVETS • Under shearing resistance of plate per pitch Rivet resistance to

Where, P(s) = shearing resistance of plate per pitch d = Diameter of rivet hole f(s) = permissible shearing strength

CASES OF FALIURE OF RIVET

Under crushing resistance of plate per pitch. P(c) = (nd)*t*f(c)

Where, P(c) = Tearing resistance of plate per pitch n = no of rows of rivet t = thickness of plate f(c) = permissible crushing strength

CASES OF FALIURE OF RIVET Under crushing resistance of plate per pitch. P(c) = (nd)*t*f(c) Where,

Emprical Proportions of dimensions of riveted joints

Diameter of rivets.

the diameter of the rivet hole (d) may be determined by using

Thickness of plate

Emprical Proportions of dimensions of riveted joints • Diameter of rivets. the diameter of the rivet

t = Thickness of the plate Distance of centre of the rivet from edge of the plate = 1.5d

Margin , m=d Longitudinal Pitch p=3d Transverse pitch pt = 0.8P for chain riveting = 0.6P for zig-zag riveting Thickness of butt strap. Single cover plate t1 = 1.125 t Double cover plate t2 = 0.7 to 0.8t

PROPER DIMENSIONING OF RIVETS IMPROVING ITS FAILURE DEFECTS

PROPER DIMENSIONING OF RIVETS IMPROVING ITS FAILURE DEFECTS We can do proper dimensioning of rivets after

We can do proper

dimensioning of rivets after

Studying and improving its

failure defects……… ..

EFFICIENCY OF RIVET JOINT

η = Least value of P(t),P(s),P(c)

Strength of un-riveted plate

Where, Strength of un-riveted plate = σ(t)*pt

JOINTS

EFFICIENCIE(%)

DISADVANTAGES OF LAP AND SINGLE STRAP BUTT

JOINT

The disadvantages in lap joint is that when the plates are in tension owing to their not

being in the same plane, a couple acts

about the rivets, tending to bend the joint.

DISADVANTAGES OF LAP AND SINGLE STRAP BUTT JOINT • The disadvantages in lap joint is that

The single strap butt joint also suffers the same problem. Beside, this joint has further

disadvantage that it can be caulked only on one side and therefore, single strap butt joints should never be used for boiler purposes. Even in other applications it is rarely used.