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Fiber Reinforced Concrete

(FRC)
Feisal salah
Introduction
Is a concrete mix that contains short discrete fibers, uniformly
distributed and randomly oriented

Aims to produce stronger and tougher concrete


Can add to the tensile loading capacity of the composite system

4 types of FRC:
Steel Fibers (SFRC)
Glass Fibers (GFRC)
Synthetic Fibers (SFRC)
Natural Fibers (NFRC)
Advantages
Ease of installation
Concrete placement and crack control
in one operation
No requirement for crack control steel
mesh
Increased cohesion of the mix
Reduced bleeding of water to the
surface
Disadvantages
Greater reduction of workability
High cost of the materials
Steel Fiber Reinforce Concrete
Increases strain capacity and impact
resistance
Improved resistance to impact and greater
ductility of failure in compression, flexure
and torsion
High tensile strength (0.5 – 2 GPa)
Modulus of elasticity (200 GPa)
Ductile/plastic stress-strain characteristic
Low creep
Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete
Mixed by Portland cement, fine
aggregates, water and alkali-resistant
glass fibers
High tensile strength (2 – 4 GPa)
Elastic modulus (70 – 80 GPa)
Brittle stress-strain characteristics (2.5 –
4.8% elongation at break)
Low creep at room temperature
Synthetic Fiber Reinforced
Concrete
Man-made fibers from petrochemical and
textile industries
Low-volume percentage (0.1 to 0.3% by
volume)
high-volume percentage (0.4 to 0.8% by
volume)
Selected Synthetic Fiber Types and
Properties
Types of Synthetic Fiber
Reinforced Concrete
Acrylic
Aramid
Carbon
Nylon
Polyester
Polyethylene
Polypropylene
Natural Fiber Reinforced Concrete
Obtained at low cost and low levels of
energy using local manpower and
technology
Unprocessed natural fibers
- made with unprocessed natural fibers such as
coconut coir, sisal, sugarcane bagasse, bamboo, jute,
wood and vegetable
Processed natural fibers
- Wood cellulose is the most frequently
Typical Properties of Natural Fibers
Application of FRC
Applications for new construction

Bridge

Repair and rehabilitation applications



Beam and Slab

Architectural applications

Interior Design
Use of Carbon FRC as reinforcement of a concrete slab
Comparison
Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) Normal Reinforce Concrete

• Higher durability • Lower durability

• Protect steel from corrosion • Steel potential to corrosion

• Lighter (materials) • Heavier (materials)

• More Expensive • Economical

• With the same of volume, the • With the same of volume, the
strength is greater strength is less.

• higher workability • Less workability as compare to FRP


Conclusion
FRC - very costly
- normally apply on bridge constructions
- the ability to sustain a load without
excessive deformation or failure
- used as external reinforcement in the
rehabilitation of reinforced concrete (RC)
beams and slabs
- architects used it as siding/cladding,
roofing, flooring and partitions