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FHM TRAINING TOOLS

This training presentation is part of


FHMs commitment to creating and
keeping safe workplaces.
Be sure to check out all the training
programs that are specific to your
industry.

Pedestrian Safety

These materials have been developed based on applicable federal laws and regulations in place at the time the materials were created. The program
is being provided for educational and informational purposes only and does not constitute and is not intended to provide OSHA compliance certification,
regulatory compliance, a substitute for any "hands on training required by applicable laws and regulations, or other legal or professional advice or
services. By accessing the materials, you assume all responsibility and risk arising from the use of the content contained therein.
2010 Grainger Safety Services, Inc.

Learning Objectives
Objectives:
Understand

risks of people and


vehicles sharing space

Present

practical control strategies


to minimize injuries

Agenda
Presentation agenda:
Overview
Facility

design

Administrative
Your

controls

responsibilities

Section 1

Overview

2003 Traffic Safety Facts


Traffic safety facts:
4,749

pedestrians killed in
traffic crashes

70,000

injured

86%

of all non-occupational
roadway fatalities

2/3

of the fatalities were male

Aged

70+

2003 Work Zone Safety Facts


Federal Highway Administration:
1,028

were killed

40,000

injured yearly

85%

of fatalities are drivers


or occupants

15%

of fatalities are non-motorists

Pedestrians in the Workplace


Pedestrians in the workplace:
Issue

not confined to public roads

Moving

vehicles and pedestrians


creates potential for accidents

OSHA

reported 336 fatalities


in 2003

Control Measures
Engineering controls:
Physical

separation of pedestrians and vehicles

Improving
Use

facility design

of safer mobile equipment

Administrative controls:
Worker

training

Restricting

access

Establishing

traffic flow patterns

Section 2

Facility Design

Physical Separations of Pedestrians and Vehicles


Preference is for segregation:
Pedestrian

walkways

Pedestrian

barriers

Designated traffic routes:


Wide

as possible, and marked

Separate

access to building

Crossings:
Markings
Visibility

and signs

and lighting

Pedestrian Barriers
Pedestrian barriers:
Longitudinal

obstructions that separate and protect

OSHA

recommends barriers of sufficient strength


and low deflection characteristics

Short,

non-continuous segments should be avoided

Vertical

curbs

Traffic Routes
Workplace traffic routes:
Safe

for all

Wide

enough for largest vehicle

One-way
Free

from excessive gradients

Well

maintained

Free

from damage

Parking Areas
Onsite parking:
Separate
Clear,

work and private vehicle spaces

well lit walkways

Employees and customers with private vehicles:


Specified

safe routes

Clear

signage

Clear

posted speed limits

Illumination
All routes:
Adequately
Avoid

lit

extreme light variation

Provide

sun glare protection

Operational Safety of Vehicles and Equipment


Contributors to pedestrian safety:
Horns,

lights, reflectors, reverse


lights, and back-up alarms

Good

visibility

Clean

windshields

Preventive

maintenance

Section 3

Administrative
Controls

Worker Training
Workplace pedestrians:
Co-existing
Facility

with traffic

design features

Pedestrian

safety rules

Equipment operators:
Safe

equipment operation

Pedestrian
Facility

areas

speed limits

Worker Training
Segregating pedestrians and vehicles:
Restrict
Time

pedestrian movement

separation

Barriers

and pathways

Controlling Traffic Flow


Controlling traffic flow:
Prohibit

left turns

Prohibit

U-turns

Set

speed limits

Prohibit

reverse driving

Designate

traffic routes

Speed Control
Workplace speed limits:
Based

on hazards

Prominently

posted

Enforcement

Clothing and Personal Protective Equipment


Effective strategies:
High

visibility apparel

Fluorescent

colored high-visibility
apparel at dawn or dusk

Yellow-green

colors for
good contrast to equipment

Section 4

Your
Responsibilities

Your Responsibilities
Your responsibilities:
Recognize

proper pedestrian and


vehicle flow

Dont
Use

ignore barricades

proper pathways

Your Responsibilities
Stay aware and undistracted:
Observe

all signs, barricades, and


design features

Operate

your vehicle safely

Anticipate

pedestrians