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Consumer Buying Behavior

Case : Lifebouy : Swasthya Chetna


Abhiyan Initiating a behaviour change

Consumer Behaviour
Learning Objectives:
To

Understand what motivates a customer to buy a


product or service.
To Understand the Buying Roles
To Understand the different types of buying.
To Know the consumer decision making process.

Consumer Behaviour
Definition:
Consumer buyer Behaviour
The buying behaviour of final consumers- individuals and
households who buy goods and services for personal
consumption.
Consumer Market:
All the individuals and households who buy or acquire
goods and services for personal consumption.

Consumer Behaviour
Businesses now spend considerable sums
trying to learn about what makes customers
tick.
The questions they try to understand are:
Who buys?
How do they buy?
When do they buy?
Where do they buy?
Why do they buy?

Consumer Buying Decision Process


Marketers Must Identify and Understand:
Who Makes the Buying Decision
Types of Buying Decisions
Stages in the Buying Process

Consumer Buying Decision Process


Understand

Buying roles
Buying behavior
Buying decision
process

Initiator
Influencer
Decider
Buyer
User

Consumer Buying Decision Process


Understand

Buying roles
Buying behavior
Buying decision
process

Complex buying
behavior
Dissonance-reducing
buying behavior
Habitual buying behavior
Variety-seeking buying
behavior

Types of Buying Behaviour


High Involvement
Significanc
e
differences
between
the brand
Few
differences
between
the brand

Low Involvement

Complex
Buying
behaviour

Variety Seeking
buying
behaviour

Dissonance
reducing
buying
behaviour

Habitual buying
behaviour

Consumer Buying Decision Process


Understand

Buying roles
Buying behavior
Buying decision
process

Five stages in the


consumer buying
process
The amount of time
spent in each stage
varies according to
several factors

Consumer Buying Decision Process


Five-Stage Model of the Consumer Buying Process

Need Recognition

Need/Problem Recognition

Can be triggered by internal or external


stimuli
Needs become wants, which lead to
behavior

Marketing stimuli can stimulate a desire


for information

How does the customer obtain the


information ?
Personal sources:
family, friends, neighbours etc

Commercial sources:
advertising; salespeople; retailers; dealers;
packaging; point-of-sale displays

Public sources:
newspapers, radio, television, consumer
organisations; specialist magazines

Experiential sources:
handling, examining, using the product

How does the customer use the


information obtained?
High-involvement purchases include
those involving high expenditure or
personal risk for example buying a
house, a car or making investments.
Low involvement purchases (e.g.
buying a soft drink, choosing some
breakfast cereals in the supermarket)
have very simple evaluation processes.

Consumer Buying Decision Process


Successive Sets Involved in Consumer Decision Making

Alternative evaluation

The stage of the buyer decision


process in which the consumer uses
information to evaluate alternative
brands in the choice set.

Customers evaluate products as bundles of


attributes

Brand attributes
Product features
Aesthetic attributes
Price

Purchase Decision

Purchase intention and the act of buying are


distinct concepts

Potential intervening factors between intention and


buying (car example):

Unforeseen circumstances
Angered by the salesperson or sales manager
Unable to obtain financing
Customer changes mind

Key issues in the purchase decision stage:

Product availability
Possession utility

Postpurchase Evaluation

Four possible outcomes in the postpurchase


stage:

(1) Delight
(2) Satisfaction
(3) Dissatisfaction
(4) Cognitive Dissonance

Firms ability to manage dissatisfaction and


cognitive dissonance is:

A key to creating customer satisfaction


A major influence on word-of-mouth communication

Campbells neuromarketing
initiative