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CONCERT HALLS

ACOUSTIC
DESIGN

Definition
Concert halls
Materials used

CONCERT HALL

Aconcert
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a
whereconcertsofclassical musictake
Concert hall can either mean the
room where the concerts takes place,
whole building.

place
place.
actual
or the

CONCERT HALL

A concert hall is usually a big hall: big enough for


anorchestra to be on the stage. A small concert
hall, designed for just a few performers (as
inchamber music) may be called a recital hall.

CONCERT HALLS

Boston Symphony Hall, US

Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, UK

Grosser Musikvereinssaal, Vienna, Austria

Philharmonie de Paris, France

Sala So Paulo, Brazil

The Sibelius Hall, Lahti, Finland

Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall, Japan

In some ways, even the largest hall is no


difference from the smaller rooms, the basic
acoustic criteria are the same.

Must have a low ambient noise


level from internal and external
sources
Provide a reasonable level of
acoustic gain
Provide appropriate reverberation
time
Avoid artefacts such as echoes

ARCHITECTURAL
CONSIDERATIONS
Hearing conditions in any auditorium are
considerably affected by purely architectural
considerations like:

Shape
Dimension
Volume
Layout of boundary surfaces
Seating arrangements
Audience capacity

ROOM SHAPE

The talker-to-audience distance can be


minimized by carefully considering the room
geometry.

A rectangular shoebox-type hall, with the


stage cross one narrow end may be excellent
for music where an audience can be seated
farther away and a greater ratio of
reverberated sound is desirable

MATERIALS USED

BARREL SHAPED DIFFUSER

Diffusors (or diffusers) are used to treat


sound aberrations in rooms such as
echoes. They are an excellent
alternative or complement to sound
absorption because they do not remove
sound energy, but can be used to
effectively reduce distinct echoes and
reflections while still leaving a live
sounding space.

PERFORATED METAL

Perforated metal(also known,


depending on thickness, as
perforated sheet, perforated
plate, stamping plates, or
perforated screen) is made
through themetal
stampingandsheet
metalmanufacturing process.

Ceiling ofCulture Palace (Tel Aviv) concert


hall is covered with perforated metal panels

Perforated materials have many advantages


ranging from weight reduction through
acoustic noise reduction to heat dissipation
and much much more

HARD ACOUSTICAL FINISHES


AND FURNITURES

Plaster plaster is a traditional material for


ceilings and walls in concert halls.

-- to enhance reverberation and give a sense


of sound envelopment, the side walls and
sometimes the ceiling are often shaped to
scatter sounds. Plaster is often used to
create these shapes

HARD ACOUSTICAL FINISHES


AND FURNITURES

Gypsum board.

Gypsum board is seldom used un concert hall


designs because it has too much low
frequency absorption.

HARD ACOUSTICAL FINISHES


AND FURNITURES

Wood and wood paneling.

Wood, often used in concert hall design for


aesthetic reasons, must be installed with
care.
Thin wood paneling with air space behind will
allow frequency absorption through panel
vibration.

HARD ACOUSTICAL FINISHES


AND FURNITURES

Glass

Glass is seldome used in concert halls, since


these rooms are usually internal spaces
surrounded by public hallways and functional
spaces.
Glass might be used for decorative design and
lighting.

SOFT ACOUSTICAL FINISHES


AND FURNITURES

Seating
Seating absorption should match the
absorption of people so that when people ae
absent, as in rehearsal and low attendance,
there will not be a noticeable change in the
reverberation times of the hall.

HARD ACOUSTICAL FINISHES


AND FURNITURES
Carpets
Carpet is usually limited by acoustics to aisle
runners.

HARD ACOUSTICAL FINISHES


AND FURNITURES

Walls and balcony faces.


Where rear walls follow the seating curve
there is the real possibility of reflections
back to the front of the room