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BUNKERING

This is the major cause of operational


spills. Heavy fuel oil is highly viscous and
slow to dissipate.
Bunkering is the transfer of potentially
polluting fluids to or from the ship.

BUNKERING INCLUDES:
Receiving heavy fuel oil and diesel oil
Receiving lube oils in bulk
Pumping sludge / waste oil ashore

OTHER RELATED
OPERATIONS:
Transferring of fuel and diesel oil within
the vessel
Draining hydraulic oil from deck systems

OIL POLLUTION
IMO formed MARPOL.
AMSA enforces in Australia.
Individual ports can fine ship owners who
pollute the harbour.
Environmental and financial costs of
pollution are high, so avoidance is critical.

TYPES OF ACCIDENTS

Leaking flanges
Burst hose
Leaking valves
Damaged pipes
Overflowing tanks
Blow out of flange joint
Incorrect valve opened or closed

BUNKER STATION
Located on both
sides of the
vessel
Blanked when
not in use
Save-all and
drain plug
Pressure Gauge

SUPPLYING METHODS
Bunker barge.
Wharf pipelines.
Road tanker.

BUNKER BARGE

BUNKER BARGE

PREPARATION FOR BUNKERS


Vessel securely moored.
All valves used for the operation are
checked. Kept shut if not in use.
Fitting scupper plugs.
Hoisting bunker flag.
Emptying water and plugging save-all at
manifolds and tank breathers.
Placing "NO SMOKING" signs.
Placing fire extinguisher near manifold
Placing oil absorbent near manifold

PREPARATION FOR
BUNKERS

Set up oil spill emergency pump (if fitted).


Prepare hose crane or davit.
Communications ready and tested.
Rig ropes to secure bunker line.
Check opposite manifold.
Dip tanks.
Check all hoses and connection fittings.
Prepare for mooring of bunker barge.

PREPARATION FOR
BUNKERS

HOSE CONNECTION
Flange Connection
flanges clean
jointing good and of
correct material
evenly tightened all
nuts

HOSE
CONNECTION
Kamloc Fitting
coupling clean and
clear
jointing (O ring) good
push in before closing
arms
arms held shut by a
wire

AFTER COUPLING HOSE


Ropes used to support weight of hose.
Check that hose cannot suffer mechanical
damage.
Blow through with compressed air.

PRE-START CHECKS
Understanding the communication system
with the fuel supplier.
Understanding the communication system
with the duty Engineer.

DUTIES DURING BUNKER


OPERATIONS

Commence at a slow pumping rate.


Maintain watch on hose.
Check couplings for leaks.
Check pressure on gauge.
Sound tanks as required.
Ensure "NO SMOKING" or "NAKED FLAMES"
signs are maintained.
Maintaining communication with fuel supplier,
duty engineer and deck officer.
Ensure sample is taken.

BUNKER SAMPLING
To ensure bunker is
compatible and
correct
By suppliers and
vessel
Continuous - Auto
Manual - spread out
the sample intervals

AUTO SAMPLING

SAMPLING

POST BUNKERING
OPERATIONS

Blown through with compressed air.


Shut the ships bunker valve.
Manifold couplings "broken" with care.
Blanks are then fitted to both the hose and
the ships manifold.

POST BUNKERING
OPERATIONS
Lowering of the bunker hose
shore/barge.
Letting go the barge mooring lines.
Stowing the vessels bunkering gear.

to

WHAT IF?

The manifold coupling begins to leak?


The pressure rises or falls dramatically?
The hose fails?
Oil spills from a tank breather onto the
deck?

Dealing with an Oil Spillage


If a spillage occurs:
Stop the bunkering operation as quickly as
possible and close the manifold valves.
Immediately open an empty tank, if available, to
relieve the pressure on the overflowing tank.
Once the loading has been suspended, and if no
empty tank is available, ease the pressure on the
overflowing tank by letting it run back to other tanks
that have a slightly lower head.
Sound the emergency alarm to muster and alert all
available crew.

Dealing with an Oil Spillage


If a spillage occurs:
If the oil has spilled overboard the port authority
and ships agent are to be notified immediately. Try
to limit the spread of the oil with a boom or
mooring line.
If oil is present in quantity on deck, open a suitable
tank clearing plate to allow the oil to run and/or be
swept into the ship's tanks.
Have additional fire fighting appliances brought to
immediate readiness. In particular, have available
as many foam drums/extinguishers as possible.

Dealing with an Oil Spillage


If a spillage occurs:
Resume bunkering when the Master is satisfied
about the safety of the vessel and when
permission has been received from shore
authorities.
At all times during the emergency, be prepared to
render assistance as required by the shore
authorities.

Dealing with an Oil Spillage


If a spillage occurs when discharging
sludge:
Shut down the vessels pump by means of the
emergency trip.
Suspend the operation,
and close the
manifold/tank valves
Inform the jetty staff.

Thereafter, proceed as listed above.

BOOM AND PUMP

BOOM AND SKIMMER PUMP

OIL SPILL GEAR

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3677L
iwXRDQ