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EAST AFRICAN BRIBERY

INDEX TRENDS
ANALYSIS
2010-2014

Introduction
The idea of conducting a regional survey
on bribery was conceptualized in 2008.
Transparency
International
national
chapters in Kenya and Uganda partnered
with Concern for Development Initiatives
in Africa (ForDia), a contact organization in
Tanzania, to roll out the inaugural index in
2009.
In 2010 , Rwanda and Burundi were
included.

Introduction
Within the last six years, the survey
has been an important tool to inform
advocacy
on
improving
service
delivery in the region.
The results have received notable
attention
by
the
citizenry,
policymakers, governments and civil
society players.

Objectives
The objective of the survey was to
map out bribery experiences of
citizens across the five East African
countries during interactions with
key public service institutions and
sectors

Methodology
Across the five year period, over fifty
thousand respondents (53,784) randomly
sampled from the five East African
countries were interviewed face to face for
the survey.
The index examines indicators such as
likelihood of bribery, prevalence of bribery,
average size of bribe, share of national
bribe and impact of bribery.
It also examines the reasons for paying
bribes, reporting of bribery incidents and
the public's perception of corruption

Methodology
The East Africa Bribery Index trends
analysis , therefore , is a presentation
of the patterns that have emerged
from the EABI reports produced
between the year 2010 and 2014. It
focused on five sectors; Police ,
Judiciary , Registry and licensing
services , Land services and Tax
services.

KEY
FINDINGS

Country Performance
Rwanda remains the least bribery prone
country in the region.
The remaining four countries had a mixed
outlook , with Burundi being the most
bribery prone in three of the five years
under review.
Uganda was the most bribery prone country
in the region in 2012 and 2013.

Sector Performance Judiciary


Y201 Y201 Y201 Y201 Y201
Country 0
1
2
3
4

Uganda
Burundi
Kenya
Rwanda
Tanzani
a

50
52
59

59
50
44

44
63
30
6

42
48
38
24

31
35
47
37

75 76 45 38 42

Sector Performance Police


Countr Y201 Y201 Y201 Y201 Y201
y
0
1
2
3
4
Uganda 71 81 85 60 84
Burundi 80 78 63 64 73
78 80 72 71 68
Kenya
Rwand

38 54 47
a
Tanzani
85 83 83 73 83
a

Sector Performance Lands


services

Countr Y201 Y201 Y201 Y201 Y201


y
0
1
2
3
4
Uganda 32 59 27 47 60

36 52 42
Burundi
53 56 70 47 55
Kenya
Rwand
12
15
12

a
Tanzani
44 45 20 27 36
a

Sector Performance Tax


services
Y201 Y201 Y201 Y201 Y201
Country
0
1
2
3
4

Uganda
Burundi
Kenya
Rwand

a
Tanzani
a

77 65 33 20 15
90 69 36 16 20
41 28 14 15 23

7 19 10

53 47 11 37 14

WHY DID YOU PAY A BRIBE?


Count
ry
Reason
To hasten the service
It was the only way to access the
Burundi service
Kenya To hasten the service
To hasten the service
To access a service I did not legally
Rwanda deserve
Tanzania To hasten the service
It was the only way to access the
Uganda service

DID YOU REPORT THE


INCIDENT?

Burundi

No

92%

Kenya

No

93%

Rwanda

No

86%

Tanzania

No

91%

Uganda

No

93%

WHY DIDNT YOU


Countr
REPORT?
y

Reason
Fear of self incrimination
Burun
Fear of Intimidation/reprisal
di
I was a beneficiary
I knew no action would be taken
Kenya even if I reported
Rwand
a
Fear of self incrimination
Tanzan I knew no action would be taken
ia
even if I reported
Ugand I knew no action would be taken

How would you describe the


current state of corruption?

Average
%

Country

Level

Burundi

High

54%

Kenya

High

57%

Rwanda

Low

68%

Tanzania

High

53%

Uganda

High

67%

Is the government doing enough


to fight corruption?

Country
Burundi
Kenya
Rwanda
Tanzania
Uganda

Respons Average
e
%
No
45
No
53
Yes
94
No
47
No
57

Recommendations
Strengthen National anti-corruption bodies
The report recommends that the governments in
the region focus on the unfinished business of legal
and institutional reforms on anti-corruption.
Introduction of anti-corruption initiatives at
institutional level
This could include among others, instituting codes of
conduct and ethics of public officers, regular anticorruption training for public officers, having
complaints resolution mechanisms that are able to
receive and resolve corruption incidents at the
institutional level.

Recommendations
Political will
The governments in the region need to invest more
political will in tackling corruption. The fact that there
have been many policy and legal reforms across the
countries in the review period while the vice persists may
be indicative that the problem partially lies elsewhere.
Continued Civic education
Both governmental and non-governmental bodies need
to strengthen their public education and information
efforts on corruption. This intervention will make the
general public a more active player in demanding better
services.

Recommendations
Stronger regional anti-corruption initiatives
The governments should strengthen regional
approaches to anti-corruption especially through
regional mechanisms like the East African
Community Secretariat. In particular the
actualization of the East African Community
Protocol on Good Governance should be hastened.
Secondly, the East African Association of AntiCorruption Authorities (EAAACA) should be
supported to play a stronger coordination role
across the region.

Way Forward
TI national chapters and partners in
the five East African countries
welcome partnerships with public
institutions aimed at
comprehensively identifying and
strengthening internal systems and
procedures to curb corruption

Thank You

@TIKenya
@transparencyUga
@transparencyRwan
da
@ABUCO_TIBurundi
#EABriberyIndex