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Food Fortification &

Adulteration

Food Fortification
WHO The process whereby nutrients are
added to foods (in relatively small
quantities) to maintain or improve the
quality of the diet of a group , a community
or a population.

History of Food Fortification


Iodised Salt was used in the United
States before World War II
Vitamin D was added to margarine in
Denmark in early 50s
Vitamin A & D were added to Vanaspati
(hydrogenated Vegetable Oil) in India
since 1954

Fortification of food under the


government supported
programmes

Fortification of ICDS supplementary


cooked food
Fortification of food for the Mid Day
Meal
Fortification of factory produced
Ready-to-Eat (RTE) foods
Fortification of wheat flour supplied
through Targeted Public
Distribution System(TPDS)

Vehicles for fortification with


combinations of
micronutrients
Vehicles
Edible common salt
Whole wheat flour &
Maida
Rice
Vegetable oils
Milk and Dairy
products
ICDS supplementary
foods
Sugar

Micronutrients
Iron, Iodine
Iron, Folic Acid, Calcium,
Zinc
Iron, Folic Acid, Calcium, Zinc
Vit. A & D
Vitamin D, A Iron, Folic Acid,
Calcium, Omega-3,6 Fatty
Acids
Iron, Folic Acid, Calcium, Zinc
Vitamin A
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Criteria for Fortification


Nutrient deficiency should be widespread.
The vehicle food must be consumed by the
target group
The high consumption of fortified food will
not lead to toxicity
Addition of micronutrient should not change
the taste, colour, flavour, texture and shelflife of the food item
The item of food should be centrally
controlled and monitored
The cost of fortification should be affordable

Advantages
Providing certain nutrients simultaneously
in the same food improves the utilization
of certain
Vitamins and minerals, e.g. vitamin C
enhances the absorption of iron
Providing nutrients through the regular
food supply and distribution system
reduces costs.

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Food adulteration
The process of lowering the nutritive
value of food either by removing a
vital component or by adding
substances of inferior quality, is
called food adulteration.

FSSA - Adulterant

Any material which is or could be employed


for making the food unsafe or sub-standard
or mis-branded or containing extraneous
matter
Misbranded:
False claims on label / ad
Imitation / substitute
False statement, design or device
regarding the ingredients
False Manufacturer details or
Improper label - artificial flavouring,
colouring or chemical preservative

Common Food Adulterants


S. Food

Common Adulterants

n
1

Material
Milk

Extraction of fat, Addition of starch

Coffee

& Water
Date husk, Tamarind husk, Chicory

powder
Mustard

Seeds of prickly poppy-argemone

4
5
6
7

seeds
Butter
Honey
Rice, wheat
Black

Oleo, margarine
Fructose syrup /cane sugar
Mud grits , Soapstone bits
Dried seeds of papaya

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Health Hazards of Adulteration


Breaking of teeth
Cause GIT disturbances like diarrhea,
infections .
Stomach or intestinal Cancer.
Toxicity due to toxic sweeteners, additives,
colours etc.
Lathrysim due to consumption of Kesari
dal .
Epidemic Dropsy due to consumption of
Argemone oil mixed mustard oil.
Various abnormalities of bone ,eyes ,skin
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and lungs.

Food Standards
1. Codex Alimentarius :
Collection of international food standards
recommended by FAO and WHO.

2. PFA-Standards :
Its purpose is to obtain a minimum level of
quality of food stuffs attainable under Indian
conditions.

3. Agmark Standards:
Gives the consumer an assurance of quality in
accordance with standards laid down

4. Bureau Of Indian Standards:


The ISI mark on any article of food is a guarantee
of good quality

Prevention of Food Adulteration Act (PFA)


1954

Enacted in 1954 and amended in 1963, 1969


and1986 to make it more stringent
OBJECTIVES:
Social legislation to protect health of the
consumer
To ensure foods of honest and nutritive
value
To punish guilty traders and manufacturers

Community Nutritional Programmes


Large scale supplementary
programmes
Main aim is to improve nutritional
status in targeted groups
To overcome specific diseases
through various ministries to
combat malnutrition

Programmes

Ministry

Vitamin A Prophylaxis Program

Health and
family
Welfare

Prophylaxis Against Nutritional


anaemia
IDDs Control Program
Special Nutritional Program
Balwadi Nutritional Program

Social
welfare

ICDS Program
Mid Day Meal Program

Education

Vitamin A Prophylaxis
Programme

Initiated in 1970
Age group 1-5 year
Priority to VAD geographical area
Objective
Prevent blindness due to VAD

Organization
PHC and subcenter

Vitamin A Prophylaxis
Programme
Beneficiary group
preschool children(6 months to 5 years)
a single massive dose of oily preparation of
Vitamin A 200,000 IU (retinol palmitate
110mg) orally every 6 months for every
preschool child above 1 year
half the amount in < than 1 year children

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Prophylaxis Against Nutritional


Anaemia
Pregnant woman
<11 gm/dl
Non pregnant woman
<12gm/dl
Initiated in 1970
Centrally sponsored
Over 50%pregnant woman suffer
from anemia
20% of maternal death
Causes LBW and perinatal mortality

National Iodine Deficiency


Disorder Control Programme
National goiter control programme
in 1962
IDD Control Programme
Replace the entire edible salt by
iodide salt

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Special Nutritional Programme


Started in 1970 is in operation in urban
slums, tribal areas and backward rural
areas.
Launched under minimum need programme
Main aim is to improve nutritional status in
targeted group

Beneficiary group

Children below 6 years


Pregnant and lactating women

child
: 300kcal and 10-12gm protein
pregnant : 500kcal and 25 gm protein
Total of 300 days in a year
This programme is gradually being merged
into ICDS

Applied Nutritional Programme


This project was started in Orissa on 1963
Later extended to TN and UP
Objectives:
Promoting production and of protective food such
Vegetables and fruits
Ensure their consumption by pregnant & lactating
women and children.

1973 it is extended to all states in INDIA


Mainly through nutritional education
Nutrition worth 25 paisa for children and 50 paisa for
pregnant and lactating women for 52 days in a year
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Major components

Nutritional Services
Health services
Communication
Monitoring and evaluation
Later it is converted as ICDS

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Balwadi Nutrition
Programme
This was started in 1970 under the department
of social welfare
Beneficiary group
preschool children 3-6years of age
300kcal and 10gm protein
Also provided with pre school education
Balawadis are being phased out because
universalization of ICDS

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Principles of Mid Day Meal


programme
The meal should be supplement and not a
substitute to home diet.
Supply at least one third of the total
energy requirement and half of the
protein needed
Cost of meal should be reasonably low
Prepared easily in schools, no
complicating cooking procedures involved
Locally available foods should be used
The menu should be frequently changed

National Prophylaxis Programme against


Nutritional Blindness due to Vitamin A Deficiency

Initiated in 1970 with the specific aim


of preventing nutritional blindness
due to Vit. A
Initially, age group of eligible children
was restricted to 9 to 36 months of
age
In 2006, revised as 6-59 months
Implemented through the existing
network of primary health centres

Integrated Child
Development Services
(ICDS) Scheme

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ICDS
Launched on 2nd October 1975.
ICDS Scheme represents one of the worlds
largest and most unique programmes for
early childhood development.
Indias response to the challenge of
Providing pre-school education on one hand and
Breaking the vicious cycle of malnutrition,
morbidity, reduced learning capacity and
mortality, on the other.

ICDS is the foremost symbol of Indias


commitment to her children.
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Purpose for Initiation


Routine MCH services not reaching target
Population
Nutritional component not covered by
Health services
Need for community participation

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Objectives:
1. To improve the nutritional and health status of children in
the age-group 0-6 years;
2. To lay the foundation for proper psychological, physical and
social development of the child;
3. To reduce the incidence of mortality, morbidity, malnutrition
and school dropout;
4. To achieve effective co-ordination of policy and
implementation amongst the various departments to
promote child development; and
5. To enhance the capability of the mother to look after the
normal health and nutritional needs of the child through
proper nutrition and health education.
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Services:
The above objectives are sought to be
achieved through a package of services
comprising:
1. Supplementary nutrition,
2. Immunization
3. Health check-up
4. Referral services
5. Pre-school non-formal education and
6. Nutrition & health education.
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Beneficiaries of ICDS
Adolescent Girls

Children < 6 years

Pregnant Woman

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Lactating women

Women in Reproductive
age group
JLNH&RC(15-44)

Services and beneficiaries


Services

Target Group

Supplementary
Nutrition

Children below 6 years:

Immunization*

Children below 6 years:

Pregnant & Lactating Mother (P&LM)

Service Provided by
Anganwadi Worker and
Anganwadi Helper
ANM/MO

Pregnant Women
Health Check-up*

Children below 6 years:

ANM/MO/AWW

Pregnant & Lactating Mother (P&LM)


Referral Services

Children below 6 years:

AWW/ANM/MO

Pregnant & Lactating Mother (P&LM)


Pre-School Education

Children 3-6 years

AWW

Nutrition & Health


Education

Women (15-45 years), Children 3-6


years

AWW/ANM/MO

Pregnant & Lactating Mother (P&LM)


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Supplementary Nutrition
This includes supplementary feeding and growth
monitoring; and prophylaxis against vitamin A
deficiency and control of nutritional anaemia.
Growth Monitoring and nutrition surveillance are
two important activities that are undertaken.
Children <3 years of age of age are weighed once a
month
children 3-6 years of age are weighed quarterly

They avail of supplementary feeding support for


300 days in a year.
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Immunization:
Immunization of pregnant
women and infants
protects children from six
vaccine preventable
diseases-poliomyelitis,
diphtheria, pertusis,
tetanus, tuberculosis and
measles.
Immunization of pregnant
women against tetanus
also reduces maternal
and neonatal mortality

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JLNH&RC

Health Check-ups
This includes health care of children
less than six years of age, antenatal
care of expectant mothers and
postnatal care of nursing mothers
recording of weight, immunization,
management of malnutrition,
treatment of diarrhoea, de-worming
and distribution of simple medicines
etc.
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Referral Services:
During health check-ups and growth
monitoring, sick or malnourished
children, in need of prompt medical
attention, are referred to the Primary
Health Centre or its sub-centre

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Non-formal Pre-School Education


(PSE)
anganwadi a village
courtyard
PSE is considered the
backbone of the ICDS
programme.
Its for the three-to six
years old children and
is directed towards
providing and ensuring
a natural, joyful and
stimulating
environment
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Nutrition and Health Education


It is a key
element of the
work of the
anganwadi
worker.
This forms part
of BCC
(Behaviour
Change
Communication)
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THE ICDS TEAM:


The ICDS team comprises
Anganwadi Workers,
Anganwadi Helpers,
Supervisors,
Child Development Project Officers
(CDPOs) and
District Programme Officers (DPOs).
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Role of AWW
To elicit community support
Participation in running the program
Weigh & record each child every month
Refer cases
Organize non-formal pre-school activities
Provide supplementary nutrition
Provide health & nutrition education and
counseling

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Role of AWW
Make home visits
Assist PHC staff
Guide ASHA
Assist in implementation of Kishori
Shakti Yojana (KSY)

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Role of AW Helper
Cook & serve food
Clean the Anganwadi premises
Cleanliness of small children
Bring small children to Anganwadi

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Role of ASHA
Awareness generation
Counsel women
Community mobilization
Work with VHSC
Escort/accompany pregnant women &
children requiring treatment
Provide primary medical care

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Role of ANM
Hold weekly / fortnightly meeting with ASHA
Participate & guide in organizing the Health
Days at AWC
Utilize ASHA in motivating the pregnant
women and married couples
Guide ASHA in motivating pregnant women
for full ANC
Educate ASHA on danger signs of pregnancy
and labor

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Role of Health Department


Health Check-ups
Handling Referral
Immunization
Nutrition & Health Education
Monitoring of Health components

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Anganwadi Centre
Population Norms:
For Rural/Urban Projects
400-800 - 1 AWC
800-1600 - 2 AWCs
1600-2400 - 3 AWCs
Thereafter in multiples of 800 1 AWC
For Mini-AWC
150-400 -1 Mini AWC

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For Tribal /Riverine/Desert, Hilly and other


difficult areas/ Projects
300-800 - 1 AWC
For Mini- AWC
150-300 1 Mini AWC
At present there are 5659 ICDS projects.

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JLNH&RC

Supplementary Nutrition per Day


Beneficiary

Pre-revised

Revised
w.e.f. Feb.
2009

Calories Protein
(KCal)
(G)

Calorie Protein
s (KCal) (Gm)

Children (6-72
months)

300

8-10

500 12-15

Severely
malnourished
children (6-72
months)

600

20

800 20-25

Pregnant & Lactating

500

15-20

600 18-20

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Revised financial norms for food


supplement
Category

PreRevised w.e.f
revised June 2010

Children (6-72
Rs. 2.00 Rs.4.84
months)
Severely
Rs. 2.70 Rs.5.82
malnourished children
(6-72 months)
Pregnant & Lactating Rs. 2.30 Rs.6.00
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International Partners
United Nations International Children
Emergency Fund (UNICEF)
Cooperative for Assistance and Relief
Everywhere (CARE)
World Food Programme (WFP)

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Major Initiatives
Revision in Population norms
Universalization and 3rd phase of
expansion of the Scheme of ICDS
Increment in Budgetary allocation for
ICDS Scheme
Introduction of cost sharing between
Centre & States
Revision in financial norms of
supplementary nutrition
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Monitoring System
Central level
State level
Block level
Village level (Anganwadi level)

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Failures
Practically children 3-6 Yrs and
Pregnant & Lactating not covered
Irregular food supplies
Quality of Nutrition supplement?
Poor supervision
Lack of community ownership/ participation
Nutrition education only on papers
Children come only for food
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Mid Day Meal Programme


Major Objective:
improve the School attendance
reduce school drop outs
beneficial impact on Childs nutrition
Principles
1.supplement, not substitute to home diet
2.1/3 total energy requirement/day and
total protein requirement /day.
3. reasonably low cost
4.easily prepared at schools
5.as for as possible locally available food
6.change menu frequently
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JLNH&RC

Mid-day meal scheme


National programme of nutritional support to
primary education
Objective
Universalization of primary education by
increasing enrollment (class 1 to 5) and
Improve nutritional status of children.
350 to 500 kcal and 8-12gm protein

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JLNH&RC

Drawbacks
Programme is good as for as
improving nutrition of the
underprivileged children
But it requires sustainability for this
requires political will, community
participation, monitoring and
evaluation
Repeated incidence of food poisoning
in the mid day meal causing serious
threat to existence of this
1/18/16

JLNH&RC

Keep visiting
dnbpaediatrics.blogspot.in

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YOU
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INTEGRATED CHILD DEVELOPMENT


SERVICES
(ICDS)

DR. KANUPRIYA CHATURVEDI

PROGRAM OUTLINE
Started by the Government of India in
1975, the
Integrated Child Development Scheme (IC
DS)
has been instrumental in improving the
health and wellbeing of mothers and
children under 6 by providing health and
nutrition education, health services,
supplementary food, and pre-school
education.
The ICDS national development program is
one of the largest in the world. It reaches
more than 34 million children aged 0-6

Lesson Objectives
To know the extent of malnutrition
To know about the goals. objectives
target groups, service components
and coverage of ICDS program
To know about the impact of the
Program

Under nutrition in Children under Age 3

SOURCE: NFHS-3 2005-6

Anemia among Children Age 6-35


Months

SOURCE; NFHS -3 2005-6

Recommended and Actual


Breastfeeding Practices
Goal: Initiation of breastfeeding
within 1 hour of birth
Achievement: 25%
Goal: No prelacteal feeding
Achievement: 43%
Goal: Exclusive breastfeeding

(6 months)
Achievement: 46%

SOURCE NFHS-3, 2005-6

Every fifth young child in the


world lives in India

Every second young child in India


is malnourished
Three out of four young
children in India are
anaemic
Every second newborn in
India is
at risk of reduced learning
capacity
due to iodine deficiency
Malnutrition limits
development potential and
active learning capacity of
the child

ICDS OBJECTIVES
To improve the nutritional status of
preschool children 0-6 years of age
group.
To lay the foundation of proper
psychological development of the child
To reduce the incidence of mortality,
morbidity malnutrition and school drop
out
To achieve effective coordination of
policy and implementation in various
departments to promote child
development
To enhance the capability of the mother
to look after the normal health and
nutritional needs of of the child through

THE TARGET GROUPS


BENEFICIARY

Pregnant women

Nursing Mothers

Children less than 3 years

Children between 3-6


years

Adolescent girls( 11-18


years)

SERVICES

Health check-ups, TT,


supplementary nutrition,
health education.
Health check-us
supplementary nutrition,
health education
supplementary nutrition,
health check-ups,
immunization, referral
services
supplementary nutrition,
health check-ups,
immunization, referral
services, non formal
education
supplementary nutrition,
health education

COMPONENTS
Health Check-ups.
Immunization.
Growth Promotion and
Supplementary Feeding.
Referral Services.
Early Childhood Care and Pre-school
Education.
Nutrition and Health Education.

Supplementary nutrition
Each child upto 6 years of age to get
300 calories and 8-10 grams of
protein
Each adolescent girl to get 500
calories and 20-25grams of protein
Each pregnant women and lactating
mother to get 500 calories and 20-25
gms of protein
Each malnourished child to get 600
calories and 16-20 grams of protein

Immunization
Immunization of pregnant women and
infants protects children from six vaccine
preventable diseases-poliomyelitis,
diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, tuberculosis
and measles.
These are major preventable causes of
child mortality, disability, morbidity and
related malnutrition. Immunization of
pregnant women against tetanus also
reduces maternal and neonatal mortality

Referral Services
During health check-ups and growth
monitoring, sick or malnourished children,
in need of prompt medical attention, are
referred to the Primary Health Centre or its
sub-centre.
The anganwadi worker has also been
oriented to detect disabilities in young
children. She enlists all such cases in a
special register and refers them to the
medical officer of the Primary Health
Centre/ Sub-centre

Non-formal Pre-School Education


(PSE)
Non-formal Pre-school Education (PSE)
component of the ICDS may well be
considered the backbone of the ICDS
program.
These AWCs have been set up in every
village in the country.. As a result, total
number of AWC would go up to almost 1.4
million.
This is also the most joyful play-way daily
activity, visibly sustained for three hours a
day. It brings and keeps young children at
the anganwadi centre.

Contd.
Its program for the three-to six years old children
in the anganwadi is directed towards providing
and ensuring a natural, joyful and stimulating
environment, with emphasis on necessary inputs
for optimal growth and development.
The early learning component of the ICDS is a
significant input for providing a sound foundation
for cumulative lifelong learning and development.
It also contributes to the universalization of
primary education, by providing to the child the
necessary preparation for primary schooling and
offering substitute care to younger siblings, thus
freeing the older ones especially girls to
attend school.

Health check-ups
Record of weight and height of children
at periodical intervals
Watch over milestones
Immunization
General check up for detection of
disease
Treatment of diseases like diarrhea,
ARI
Deworming
Prophylaxis against vitamin A
deficiency and anemia
Referral of serious cases

Adolescent girls scheme


( Kishori shakti yojna)

General health check ups


Immunization
Treatment of minor ailments
Deworming
Prophylactic measures against
anemia, IDD, vitamin deficiency
Referral

Anganwadi Centre
Anganwadi is the Focal Point for
Delivery of ICDS Services.
Located in a Village/Slum.
Anganwadi is run by an AWW,
supported by a Helper.
AWW is the 1st Point of Contact for
Families Experiencing
Nutrition and Health Problems.

Integrated Child Development


Scheme (ICDS) in India

No. of Blocks
No. of AWW
Children (0 - 6 years)

Sanctioned

Functioning

Gap

5652

4545

19.6%

608,066

546,434

11.2%

Expectant and Nursing mothers :

35.39 million
6.38 million

Anganwadi worker (AWW)

Monitor growth of children


Provide non formal pre-school education
Provide supplementary nutrition
Give health and nutrition education
Referral for sick children
Elicit community participation
Provide health service in collaboration with
ANM/ASHA
Implement adolescent girls scheme

Training Infrastructure
There is a countrywide infrastructure for
the
training of ICDS functionaries, viz.
Anganwadi Workers Training Centres
(AWTCs) for the training of Anganwadi
Workers and Helpers.
Middle Level Training Centres (MLTCs) for
the training of Supervisors and Trainers
of AWTCs;
National Institute of Public Cooperation
and Child Development (NIPCCD) and its
Regional Centres for training of
CDPOs/ACDPOs and Trainers of MLTCs.
NIPCCD also conducts several skill
development training programmes

PROGRAM MONITORING
CENTRAL LEVEL
(i) Supplementary Nutrition : No. of
Beneficiaries (Children 6 months to 6 years and
pregnant & lactating mothers) for
supplementary nutrition;
(ii) Pre-School Education : No. of Beneficiaries
(Children 3-6 years) attending pre-school
education;
(iii) Immunization, Health Check-up and
Referral services : Ministry of Health and Family
Welfare is responsible for monitoring on health
indicators relating to immunization, health
check-up and referrals services under the

Monitoring at state level


State level: Various quantitative inputs
captured through CDPOs MPR/ HPR are
compiled at the State level for all Projects in the
State.
No technical staff has been sanctioned for the
state for programme monitoring.
CDPOs MPR capture information on number of
beneficiaries for supplementary nutrition, preschool education,
field visit to AWCs by ICDS functionaries like
Supervisors, CDPO/ ACDPO etc.,
information on number of meeting on nutrition
and health education (NHED) and vacancy
position of ICDS functionaries

Monitoring at Block level


At block level,
Child Development Project Officer
(CDPO) is the in-charge of an ICDS
Project. CDPOs MPR and HPR have been
prescribed at block level.
a supervisor,under the CDPO is required
to supervise 25 AWC on an average.
CDPO is required to send the Monthly
Progress Report (MPR) by 7th day of the
following month to State Government.
Similarly, CDPO is required to send Halfyearly Progress Report (HPR) to State by
7th April and 7th October every year.

Monitoring at village level


At the grass-root level, delivery of various
services to target groups is given at the
Anganwadi Centre (AWC).
The Monthly and Half-yearly Progress Reports
of Anganwadi Worker have also been
prescribed. AWW is required to send these
Monthly Progress Report (MPR) by 5th day of
following month to CDPO In-charge of an ICDS
Project.
Similarly, AWW is required to send Half-yearly
Progress Report (HPR) to CDPO by 5th April and
5th October every year

Nutrition and Health Education


Nutrition and Health Education
This service is not monitored at the
Central Level. State Governments are
required to monitor up to State level in
the existing MIS System.
No. of ICDS Projects and Anganwadi
Centres (AWCs) w.r.t. targeted no. of
ICDS Projects and AWCs are taken into
account for review purpose

Rapid facility Survey


More than 40 per cent AWCs (Anganwadi Centres)
across the country are neither housed in ICDS
building nor in rented buildings. One-third of the
Anganwadis are housed in ICDS building and
another one-fourth are housed in rented
buildings;
As regards the status of Anganwadi building,
more than 46 per cent of the Anganwadis were
running from pucca building, 21 per cent from
semi-pucca building, 15 per cent from kutcha
building and more than 9% running from open
space;
It is quite encouraging to observe that average
number of children registered at the Anganwadi
centre is 52 for boys and 75 for girls;

Contd.
The survey data reveal that more than 45 per cent
Anganwadis have no toilet facility and 40 per cent
have reported the availability of only urinal;
Of the 39 per cent Anganwadis reporting
availability of hand pumps, half of the hand pumps
were provided by the Gram Panchayat and 12 per
cent provided by the ICDS;
More than 90 per cent Centers provided
supplementary food, 90 per cent provided preschool education and 76 per cent weighed children
for growth monitoring;
Only 50 per cent Anganwadis reported providing
referral services, 65 per cent health check-up of
children, 53 per cent for health check-up of women
and more than 75 for nutrition and health
education;

Contd.
Average number of days in a month in
which services are provided at the
Anganwadi centers are 24 for
supplementary food, 28 for pre-school
education and 13 for Nutrition and health
education;
More than 57 per cent of Anganwadi
centers reported availability of ready-toeat food and 46 per cent availability of
uncooked food at the Anganwadi centers;
Nearly three-fourth of the Anganwadis
have reported the availability of medical
kits and baby weighing scale. On the other
hand adult weighing scale has been
reported only by 49 per cent of the

Three Decades of ICDS An


appraisal by NIPCCD (2006)
i) Around 59 per cent AWCs studied
have no toilet facility and in 17 AWCs
this facility was found to be
unsatisfactory.
ii) Around 75% of AWCs have pucca
buildings;
iii) 44 per cent AWCs covered under
the study were found to be lacking
PSE kits;
iv) Disruption of supplementary
nutrition was noticed on an average
of 46.31 days at Anganwadi level.
Major reasons causing disruption was
reported as delay in supply of items

Contd.
v) 36.5 per cent mothers did not
report weighing of new born children;
vi) 29 per cent children were born
with a low weight which was below
normal (less than 2500 gm);
vii) 37 per cent AWWs reported nonavailability of materials/aids for
Nutrition and Health Education
(NHED).

ICDS and MDG


Govt.
Programs

Contributing to MDG Goal

Concerned
Departments

1- Eradicate Extreme Poverty


NREGS,
and Hunger
PR & RD, WCD,
ICDS,
PDS 2- Promote Gender equity and Food & civil
etc
empower women
supplies Corp.
3- Reduce child mortality

Mid Day Meal Programme

WEST BENGAL

Mid Day Meal Programme


Cost of meal per child
per school day
Year

2012-13

2013-14

Primary
Central State

Upper Primary
Total

Central State

Total

*Remarks

2.17

1.00

3.17

3.25

1.08

4.33

Upto June-12

2.33

1.00

3.33

3.49

1.16

4.65

From July-12

2.50

1.00

3.50

3.75

1.25

5.00

Proposed

WEST BENGAL

Mid Day Meal Programme


Nutrition: Quantity
The Food norms would be as under:
Sl. No.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Items
Food-grains
(Rice)
Pulse
Vegetables (leafy
also)
Oil & Fat
Salt &
Condiments

Quantity Per Day


Upper
Primary
Primary
students
students
100gms

150gms

20gms

30gms

50gms

75gms

5.0gms

7.5gms

As per need

As per need

WEST BENGAL