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STUDENT EDITION

PowerPoint Presentation by
Gail B. Wright
Professor Emeritus of Accounting
Bryant University

Copyright 2007 Thomson South-Western, a part of The


Thomson Corporation. Thomson, the Star Logo, and
South-Western are trademarks used herein under license.

MANAGEMENT
ACCOUNTING
8th EDITION
BY
HANSEN & MOWEN

4 ACTIVITY-BASED PRODUCT COSTING


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LEARNING
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
OBJECTIVES
1. Discuss the importance of unit costs.
2. Describe functional-based costing
approaches.
3. Tell why functional-based costing
approaches may produce distorted costs.

Continued
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LEARNING
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
OBJECTIVES
4. Explain how an activity-based costing
system works for product costing.
5. Explain how the number of activity rates
can be reduced.

LO 1

UNIT
UNIT COST:
COST: Definition
Definition
Unit cost is the
total cost associated with the
units produced divided by the #
of units produced.
(Total cost) / (# units produced)

LO 1

What is meant by total cost?

Total cost refers to production


costs: a), ? direct materials,b) ?
c)manufacturing
direct labor,
overhead
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LO 1

How do we measure the costs


to be assigned?

Production costs we assign may


be actual or estimated
?
costs.

LO 1

How do we assign costs to a


product?

Production costs are assigned by


1 of 2 methods: functional?
activitybased
or ?
based
costing.

LO 1

UNIT COSTS
Affect
Bids submitted for special products
Development, introduction of new products
Decisions to
Make or buy a product or service
Accept or reject a special order
Keep or drop a product or service

LO 1

CAPACITY
CAPACITY LEVELS:
LEVELS: Definition
Definition
Fill in the blanks
Expected
Expected activity capacity is output for coming year
Normal activity capacity is average activity
experienced over long term
Theoretical
Theoretical activity capacity is absolute maximum
that can be achieved in perfect world
Practical
Practical activity capacity is maximum that can be
achieved under efficient operation
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LO 2

PLANTWIDE RATE:
An Example
Budgeted overhead

$360,000

Expected activity (in DLH)

100,000

Actual activity (in DLH)

100,000

Actual overhead

$380,000

Predetermined rate = Budgeted cost / Estimated activity usage


= $360,000 / 100,000
= $3.60 per DLH
Applied overhead = Overhead rate x Actual activity
= $3.60 x 100,000
=

$360,000

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LO 2

What if applied overhead


($360,000) differs from actual
overhead ($380,000)?

Underapplied (overapplied)
(overapplied)
overhead is a variance that is
added
addedto
to (subtracted from) cost
of goods sold.

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LO 3

How does a company know if


its functional-based costing is
producing distorted costs?

There are many symptoms of


distorted costs, such as profit
margins that are difficult to
explain.

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LO 3

CREATING DISTORTIONS
When
When aa unit-level
unit-level approach
approach is
is used
used to
to
assign
assign non-unit-level
non-unit-level costs
costs
(overhead),
(overhead), cost
cost information
information can
can be
be
distorted.
distorted.

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LO 4

How do you identify activities


& their attributes?

Use a key set of interview


questions and record the
answers.

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LO 4

RESOURCE
RESOURCE DRIVER:
DRIVER: Definition
Definition

Factors that measure the


consumption of resources by
activities.

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LO 4

How do you assign activity


costs?

Activity costs are assigned to


products on the basis of usage
usage.

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LO 4

CLASSIFICATION OF ACTIVITIES
Product
Product costs
costs can
can be
be assigned
assigned at
at a)
a)
unit
unit level,
level, 2)
2) batch
batch level,
level, 3)
3) product
product
level
level or
or 4)
4) facility
facility level.
level.

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LO 5

ACTIVITY BASED COST SYSTEM

Reduce size, complexity by reducing rates


Using consumption ratios
By approximating ABC

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LO 5

COMPARING
COMPARING SYSTEMS
SYSTEMS
Functional-based system
Overhead uses only unit-based activity drivers or
Splits overhead into fixed and variable and
allocates overhead based on the appropriate unitlevel rate

Activity-based system
Improves product costing by
Looking at cause & effect
Recognizing that some fixed overhead varies in
proportion to changes other than production volume
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CHAPTER 4

THE
THE END
END

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