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GANDHINAG

AR

PLANNING VISION
The state government was
determined, to have the city
designed by Indian town
planners in the best traditions
of Gujarat's rich heritage of
town planning and principles of
Mahatma Gandhi who had his
"Ashram" just south of the
proposed site of the city on the
banks of river Sabarmati.
He embarked upon a phased
construction project to create a
new state capital for Gujarat
following
the
division
of
Bombay state into Gujarat and
Maharashtra.

The villages around the


site
developed
as
residential nodes with
rapid transit to capital
complex at the centre.
This
enhanced
the
connectivity
to
different sectors of the
city
without
any
difficulty

PLANNING AND DESIGN


ASPECTS

The character of a plan for a new city is influenced by various factors, such as the
REGIONAL SETTING, SITE CONDITIONS, DOMINANT FUNCTION etc. Functionally,
Gandhinagar was to be the capital city of Gujarat.
The new city would predominantly be the administrative centre of the state and
consequently may acquire many important cultural, civic and allied functions.
Initially, the principal employer in the city would be the state government and as such, the
design population was based on the government employment structure.
In 1965 the city was planned for a population of 150,000. The total area of the site is about
5,738 hectares including and divided by the river. The area under river is about 800
hectares. The new city is planned on the western bank on 4,290 hectares of land.
Out of these, about 700 hectares along the river front are left out for river side
development. The area of the land in the eastern side of the river, not proposed for
immediate use, is about 650 hectares.
The
city was planned for a population of 150,000 but can accommodate double that
population with increase in the floor space ratio from 1 to 2 in the areas reserved for
private development.
The river being the border on the east, and the industrial area to the North, the most
logical future physical expansion of the city was envisaged towards the north-west.
To retain the identity of the city as a new town and the capital, the planners provided
for its growthaway from the city of Ahmedabad to the south.
Hence, as a rational extension of the grid, the planners had envisaged 30 additional
residential sectors to the northwest that could accommodate a population of 450,000.
Thus, the growth potential of the city by densification and area expansion to the
northwest is for a population of 750,000.

LAND USE

Bus transport distribution

Green space organisation


between roads with
PEDESTRIAN PATHWAYS

Area
which
can
be
utilised
for
recreational/educational
which
is
well
connected to the city
ROAD
National Highway (NH) 8 and 8C runs through the district connecting it with major cities of
the State as also with the rest of India.
It is connected with Ahmedabad by the Sarkhej Gandhinagar highway (28 km) and with
Vadodara by the Ahmedabad-Vadodara expressway (139 km) Distance from major
industrial centres in the State: Rajkot (249 km), Jamnagar (337 km), Valsad (373 km),
Ankleshwar (223 km), Bhavnagar (228 km), Mehsana (68 km) and Surat (306 km)
Distance from major cities in India: Mumbai (573 km), Delhi (943 km), Kolkata (1952 km)
and Chennai (1854 km) Road Rail
RAIL
Western railways connect Gandhinagar with major cities in India such as Delhi and
Mumbai via Ahmedabad Road, Rail & Air Connectivity
AIR

Nearest airport (Ahmedabad) is 22 km away

LOCATION
( BOTH THESE PLANNED CITIES ARE LOCATED VERY
CLOSE TO MAJOR URBAN CENTRES.)
MILTON KEYNES

GANDHINAGAR
Aim: The need for an administrative
capital of Gujarat.
Site area: 5,738 hectares
Population :4,50,000

Aim: To relieve the housing the congestion


in London
Site area: 9,000 hectares
Population :2,50,000

GOALS/ CHALLENGES
MILTON KEYNES
A balance of housing and employment
so that the city could be self contained
without large number of people needing
to commute in and out.

GANDHINAGAR
To establish and maintain a new identity for the
city, owing to its proximity to Ahmedabad.

MAJOR STRUCTURING
PRINCIPLE

Roads are curvilinear.

Dispersed land uses for an even


distribution of traffic, hence a radial
development was avoided.

Grid iron pattern


Roads are straight.

ROAD NETWORK
(similar in principle)
MILTON KEYNES

The city road network is designed for through traffic.

A grid network of city roads at approximately one kilometer


intervals saves for a dispersed pattern of employment and
reduces traffic congestion

Local routes connect several parts within the grid to each


other.

These are landscaped corridors which serve the movement of


pedestrian, cycle and vehicular traffic.

Where main local routes meet city roads, the red way always
crosses via an underpass or a bridge to the next grid square.

GANDHINAGAR

Basically, the system consists of a grid (1km. X 0.75km.) Of


motor roads and another grid (1km. X 0.75km.) Of cycle
pedestrian ways superimposed on each other so that each
residential community is served by motor roads on the
periphery and cycle ways within it.

Grade separation by an underpass with an easy gradient (1 in


50) at the intersection of cycle pedestrian ways and motor
roads will enable the two systems to work almost
independent
of
each
other
as a result of this traffic system, the main functions in the
city, such as the government offices, city center, shopping
center, riverside recreational area, industrial area, etc. Will be
accessible to residential communities by way of cycle
pedestrian ways independent of the motor roads.

CITY CENTRE
MILTON KEYNES
The camp is an exception to
the general principle of
dispersed land uses.
Located close to the
geographical center.
It is the main business,
commercial, social and
administrative focus of the
city.

GANDHINAGAR

The city center which occupies


an area of 75 hectares (190
acres) will accommodate the
major civic, cultural and
business facilities for the
city. The main bus terminus for
regional traffic routes is also
located here

CITY CHARACTER
GANDHINAGAR
.

MILTON KEYNES

HIGHER DENSITY AS COMPARED TO


MILTON KEYNES.
HAS BEEN RATED THE GREENEST
CAPITAL CITY IN INDIA

LOW DENSITY CITY IN A PREDOMINANATLY


GREEN SETTING.
NO BUILDING HIGHER THAN THREE STOREYS
EXCEPT IN THE CMK REGION.

EIGHBOURHOOD UNITS

THE TRADITIONAL POLE STRUCTURE OF GROUPING


OF HOUSES HAS BEEN VERY INGENIOUSLY
TRANSLATED INTO THE LAYOUTS FOR GOVERNMENT
HOUSING AREAS

INWARD LOOKING, A PART OF OVERLAPPING


CATCHMENT AREAS

LINEAR PARKS
MILTON KEYNES

LINEAR PARKS ALONG THE RIVERS OUSE AND OUZEL FORM A


CONTINUOS SYSTEM LINKING ALL PARTS OF THE CITY TO THE
OPEN COUNTRYSIDE BEYOND.

DISTRICT PARKS

FOR A CATCHMENT OF 15,000 PPL

ALLOW FOR ACTIVE AND PASSIVE USES IN A CONCENTRATED


SPACE.

GANDHINAGAR

THE CENTRAL VISTA IN FRONT OF THE SACHIVALAYA


COMPLEX IS PROPOSED TO BE DEVELOPED AS AN
ORNAMENTAL GARDEN INTEGRATED WITH THE RIVERSIDE
DEVELOPMENT.IN ADDITION TO THIS, A LARGE TOWN PARK
AND RECREATIONAL AREA IS TO BE DEVELOPED ALONG
THE RIVER FRONT.

DISTRICT PARKS

LARGER PLAY GROUNDS FOR ORGANIZED GAMES ARE


PROVIDED IN EACH OF THE DISTRICT CENTERS.

LOCAL OPEN SPACES


MILTON KEYNES

1 neighborhood play area


4 local play area in each square.
(Below 8 yrs.)
City gardens, amphi theatre and
view points

GANDHINAGAR
`
The city will have a series of
parks and play grounds in the
residential communities where
children from the adjoining
areas can easily walk

RESIDENTIAL AREAS
MILTON KEYNES

GANDHINAGAR

41% of total city area

Masterplan deliberately avoided firm guidelines on street layout in


residential areas., Resulting in a great variety of residential layouts.

High environmental quality, variety and sense of place.

A range of housing sites is identified within each grid square offering a


range of size, density, tenure and price to suit various households.

The regular pattern of main roads divides the city into


rectangular sectors measuring one kilometer by threefourths kilometer, with an area of 75 hectares (190 acres).
Each of these sectors will accommodate a residential
community of about 7000 persons with the necessary
facilities like schools, shopping, playgrounds, and parks.