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Egypt

Prince Emerson

Capital/
Flag

Cairo is the Capital of Egypt

Primary
Language/
Religion

Egypt's primary language is Egyptian Arabic


Their main religion is Islam but some of them are
Christians

Tourist
attraction 1

The last surviving of the Seven Wonders of the


Ancient World, the Pyramids of Giza are one of the
world's most recognizable landmarks. They were as
tombs for the mighty Pharaohs and guarded by the
enigmaticSphinx

Tourist
attraction 2

This colossal half-human, half-lion statue is one of the


largest statues on Earth carved out of a single stone.
What it was called by ancient Egyptians remains a
mystery, but the name "sphinx," based on a
mythological Greek creature, came to be associated
with this great statue.

Gebna Makleyah Oven fried cheese balls.

National
Cuisine

Molokhia The green leaves of this summer


vegetable have been used for soups in Egypt and
Sudan since the time of the Pharaohs. Other names
for Molokhia aretussa jute, Jew'smallow,nalta jute,
and Egyptian spinach.

Stereotypes
by
Americans
of people of
this culture

Tourist Mecca -Egypt has been on everyones world


tour list since Napoleon sent back etchings. Tourism is
a top earner for Egypt andthemajor source of hard
currency.
Unnecessarily Poor -With a GDP per capita of
US$4400 and with 20 percent of its 78 million people
below the poverty line, Egypt has problems, but
certainly not the worst in Africa.

Cats -The cat was the most worshipped animal in


ancient Egypt. The ancient Egyptians established laws
to protect the felines from injury and death.Pasht,an
Egyptian deity, is a cat-headed god. The ancients
dedicated an entire city to the cat god and named it
Bubastis.

Superstition
s

Weighing of the Heart After death -The ancients


believed that the good and bad deeds of a person
were recorded by his heart, and that the heart played
an important role in determining the persons
afterlife.

Never put your hands on your hips, no matter what


your facial expression, it ALWAYS means aggression.

Hand
gestures

Palm out to someone - when you want to say five


(khamsa) you may want to hold your hand up, all five
fingers out. THIS IS VERY RUDE! turn the front of your
hand to yourself, back of your hand to the other
person.

Egypt
1. Egyptian men will usually greet each other with a kiss on both
cheeks, but foreign businessmen will only be expected to shake
hands with their male Egyptian counterparts. However, they
should only shake with the right hand, because the left hand is
considered unclean.

Etiquette
and Body
language

2. Men in Egypt have a tendency to stand quite close to


other men when conversing, which might seem like an
invasion of personal space to some visitors from cultures
that value more personal distance.
America
1. When greeting your American counterpart, whether a man or a
woman, a handshake is more than sufficient. It is highly
recommended that people from cultures in which people greet
each other with an embrace or kiss on the cheeks, or both, refrain
from doing so when greeting Americans.

Relationship
Building

Egypt -Egyptians will place a lot of emphasis on the


relationship-building process, because they prefer to
only do business with people they know, trust, and
respect.Egyptians are famous for their hospitality
and for providing abundance to their guests, so the
relationship-building process will usually occur over
an extravagant meal, commonly at a restaurant.
America -The United States is a family-oriented
country, and Americans are a hospitable people, so
part of the relationship-building process might include
an invitation to someone's home to meet his or her
family and share a meal.

Communicati
on styles in
decision
making

Egypt-Egyptians tend to be soft-spoken. However,


during business negotiations, they will sometimes
raise their voices until they seem to be shouting,
because they use emotion to convey conviction; in
Egypt, being reserved can be misconstrued as lack of
interest. Egyptians also have a tendency to use
indirect language that is peppered with hyperbole.
America -Americans tend to be direct. They will
often be overtly friendly when first introduced.
However, although face-to-face meetings are
appreciated, they are not always required, as
Americans are just as confident doing business over
the phone or via e-mail.

Power
structures
in decision
making

Egypt -In Egypt, much deference is paid to power


and position, hence its extremely hierarchical
business structure, where decisions are only made by
those at the top of the company pyramid.
America -Power structures within US companies
depend on the type of firm with which you are
dealing. In larger companies and conglomerates,
there will likely be a strict hierarchical structure within
which decisions are made by top-level executives.

Internet
penetration
rate and
most
popular
social
network
sites in the
country

According to the Ministry of Communications, Internet


penetration in July was 37.8 percent with an
estimated 31 million users.
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram are the most popular
social networking sites in Egypt.

Individualis
m vs
Collectivism

In Individualist societies people are supposed to look


after themselves and their direct family only. In
Collectivist societies people belong to in groups that
take care of them in exchange for loyalty.
Egypt, with a score of 25 is considered a collectivistic
society. This is manifest in a close long-term
commitment to the member 'group', be that a family,
extended family, or extended relationships. The U.S.
with a score of 91 is considered a individualist society

Large or
Small Power
Distance

This dimension deals with the fact that all individuals


in societies are not equal. It expresses the attitude of
the culture towards these inequalities amongst us.
Egypt scores high on this dimension (score of 70)
which means that people accept a hierarchical order
in which everybody has a place and which needs no
further justification.The U.S. fairly low score
onPower Distance(score of 40) which is considered a
small power distance.

Strong or
Weak
Uncertainty
Avoidance

The extent to which the members of a culture feel


threatened by ambiguous or unknown situations and
have created beliefs and institutions that try to avoid
theseis reflected in the score on Uncertainty
Avoidance.
Egypt scores 80 on this dimension and thus has a
high preference for avoiding uncertainty. Countries
exhibiting high Uncertainty Avoidance maintain rigid
codes of belief and behavior and are intolerant of
unorthodox behavior and ideas.The US scores below
average, with a low score of 46, on theUncertainty
Avoidancedimension. As a consequence, the
perceived context in which Americans find
themselves will impact their behavior more than if the
culture would have either scored higher or lower.

The fundamental issue here is what motivates people,


wanting to be the best (Masculine) or liking what you
do (Feminine).

Masculinity
vs
Femininity

Egypt scores 45 on this dimension and is thus


considered a relatively Feminine society. In Feminine
countries the focus is on working in order to live,
managers strive for consensus, people value equality,
solidarity and quality in their working lives.The score
of the US onMasculinityis high at 62, and this can be
seen in the typical American behavioral patterns. This
can be explained by the combination of a high
Masculinity drive together with the most Individualist
drive in the world. In other words, Americans, so to
speak, all show their Masculine drive individually.

Egypt Says It Killed Senior Muslim Brotherhood Leader


in Shootout
-Egypt's Interior Ministry said early on Tuesday that it killed a seniorMuslim

Current
Events in
Egypt

Brotherhoodleader it said was responsible for the group's "armed wing" and another
member of the group in a shootout on Monday. Mohamed Kamal, 61, a member of the
group's top leadership, and Yasser Shehata, another leader, were killed. The ministry said
it raided an apartment in Cairo's Bassateen neighborhood after learning it was used by
the leaders as a headquarters.

1916: Sultan of Egypt Keeps Faith in Britain


-In an interview with a correspondent of the Associated Press, the Sultan of Egypt dealt
at considerable length with the British protectorate over his country. He said, according to
a Reuter despatch from New York: I believe that under the protection of Great Britain, the
greatest of liberal Powers, the future of Egypt is assured. Had it not been for my faith in
the British Government, and my belief that there would be a gradual increase in the rights
granted us in the matter of self-rule, I should never have undertaken the task. From a
personal standpoint I had nothing to gain. I was happy as a prince, following my
agricultural and philanthropic pursuits, with no weight of government upon my shoulders.

URL
1.

http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2016/10/03/world/middleeast/03reuters-egypt-security.html?rref=collection%2Ftim
estopic%2FEgypt&action=click&contentCollection=world&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPl
acement=1&pgtype=collection

2.

http://iht-retrospective.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/09/29/1916-sultan-of-egypt-keeps-faith-in-britain/?rref=collecti
on%2Ftimestopic%2FEgypt&action=click&contentCollection=world&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&con
tentPlacement=2&pgtype=collection

Giess, P. (1993). Global Road Warrior. Retrieved from Global Road Warrior Website:
http://www.globalroadwarrior.com.ccbcmd.idm.oclc.org/#mode=country&regionId=44&uri=countrycontent&nid=65&key=snapshot-overview
itim international. (n.d.). Geert Hofstede. Retrieved from https://geert-hofstede.com/egypt.html
Reuters. (2016, October 3). Egypt Says It Killed Senior Muslim Brotherhood Leader in Shootout. Retrieved
from The New

Works Cited

York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2016/10/03/world/middleeast/03reuters-

egypt- security.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic
%2FEgypt&action=click&contentCollection=world&region=stre
am&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=collection
Tribune, I. H. (2016, September 29). 1916: Sultan of Egypt Keeps Faith in Britain. Retrieved from The New
York Times:

http://iht-retrospective.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/09/29/1916-sultan-of-egypt-keeps-faith-in-

britain/?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FEgypt&action=click&contentCollection=world&region=stream&
module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=collecti
Wendy. (2010, April 25). Blogger. Retrieved from Exapts in Egypt:
http://expatsinegypt.blogspot.com/2010/04/hand-

gestures-body-language-and-dress.html