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Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Florida Benchmark
SC.5.P.10.3 Investigate and explain that an
electrically-charged object can attract an
uncharged object and can either attract or repel
another charged object without any contact
between the objects.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

All Charged Up
Atoms are the building blocks of matter.
Atoms are made of protons, neutrons, and
electrons.
Electric charge is a property of a particle that
affects how it behaves around other particles.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

All Charged Up
Protons have a positive charge (+1).
Electrons have a negative charge (1).
Neutrons are neutral. They have no charge.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

All Charged Up
When an atom has equal numbers of protons and
electrons, the charges cancel each other.
Atoms can gain or lose electrons. A gain or loss of
electrons will change the charge of the atom.
If an atom gains electrons, it will have a negative
charge. If it loses electrons, it will have a positive
charge.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Opposites Attract
Particles with the same charge repel, or push
away from, one another.
Particles with opposite charges attract one
another, or pull together.
Static electricity is the buildup of electric
charges.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Opposites Attract
Why does static electricity cause your hair to
stand up?

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Lightning Strikes
Static charges stay on an object until it comes
close to an object with a different charge.
An electrostatic discharge happens when electrons
jump from an object with a negative charge to an
object with a positive charge.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Lightning Strikes
Raindrops and ice particles bump into each other
during a thunderstorm, causing an electric charge
to build in the clouds.
When the difference in charge between a cloud
and the ground is great enough, lightning occurs.
Lightning is a huge electrostatic discharge.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Lightning Safety
Stay inside and turn off electrical appliances.
Stay away from windows.
If you cant get inside, wait in a car with a metal
roof.
Listen to the weather forecast for updates.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Current Events
When electric charges have a path to follow, they
move in a steady flow called an electric current.
Chemical reactions in batteries can provide a flow
of electrons.
An electricity generating station is another source
of electric current.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Current Events
What is the purpose of the insulator on the wire
shown below?

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 5 Lesson 3 What Is Electricity?

Current Events
Moving electric charges are more useful than
static electricity.
Electrons can be made to move through a wire.
They make up an electric current.
Electric currents power your home.

Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company