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BY: Joshua A. Tavra and Angelo Santana


History 101
Section: 9099
Professor: Evans

Amendment #1

Freedoms, Petitions, Assembly


Congress shall make no law respecting
an establishment of religion, or
prohibiting the free exercise thereof;
or abridging the freedom of speech, or
of the press, or the right of the people
peaceably to assemble, and to petition
the Government for a redress of

Amendment #1

Freedoms, Petitions, Assembly

hat does it mea


Congress shall make no law respecting
an establishment of religion, or
prohibiting the free exercise thereof;
or abridging the freedom of speech, or
of the press, or the right of the people
peaceably to assemble, and to petition
the Government for a redress of

What does it
mean
FACT

This was the first amendment that was


stated in our BILL OF RIGHTS!
There were 10 amendments In out bill
of rights

Freedoms, Petitions, Assembly

What does it
mean

This amendment means that congress


cant establish a permanent religion in
the U.S.
Example: The U.S. will state that
everyone has to be a Christian and
only a Christian by law.

Freedoms, Petitions, Assembly

What does it
mean

It also means that you have the right


to say what you want to say in a
respectful manner.
Example: Our 2 presidential
candidates that are about to be
elected to become president tomorrow
suck.

Freedoms, Petitions, Assembly

What does it
mean

Also the press is aloud to print


anything they want, which the
government can not conflict in there
publishing.

Example: Kim Kardashian had


liposuction.
Example: Hillary and her Emails
Example:
Is
trump
serious
about
Freedoms, Petitions, Assembly

What does it
mean

You have the right to petition a law


that unfiar or does not correspond with
the U.S. constitution.
You also have the right to march and
protest for rights, companies, etc.
Example: Petition for the release of someone
who committed a crime but there no evidence
that s/he did it.
Example: The March for equality such as: race
& gender.

Freedoms, Petitions, Assembly

Exampl
es

Freedom of Speech

Different Religions

Petition

March/protest

Press

How Is The 1 Amendment Still Relevant Today


When people ask how is the 1 amendment is still relevant today we have to look at all the things
we take for granted like freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of press, and freedom
of assembly. With freedom of speech you can say what's on your mind about anything and not get
suppress or censored by the government or the people. The First amendment also includes the
right to freely express ones religion it does by guaranteeing that every person has the right to
express any religion belief and the government is prohibited from favoring one religion over the
others. The freedom of press really plays out for us Americans because we have the right to video
tape, record, and write about anything we feel that's an issue and not be censored by the
government. Then the final thing that makes the 1 amendment so relevant is freedom of
assembly. The freedom of assembly allows people to come together to promote, pursue
collectively, and also defend your ideas. As we still use the 1 amendment to get information or
just be annoying by bashing someone else. We really take the 1 amendment for granted because
there been a lot going on in America these past few months and people try to peaceful protest or
record they been attacked for exercising their first amendment right as a citizens and this shows
that people don't like to hear or see the truth. So when someone exercise the first amendment
nobody has the right to stop you, or to bash you for what you believe in if they do you can sue
them if they ever try to infringed on your rights as a American citizen.

Joshua A. Tavra
Angelo Santana
History 101- 9099
Mr. Evans
11/08/2016
References
(n.d.). Retrieved November 08, 2016, from
http://kids.laws.com/first-amendment

@. (n.d.). Free Speech. Retrieved November 08, 2016, from


https://www.aclu.org/issues/free-speech
Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Press - Lincoln University.
(n.d.). Retrieved November 8, 2016, from
http://www.lincoln.edu/criminaljustice/hr/Speech.htm
@. (n.d.). Your Right to Religious Freedom. Retrieved
November 08, 2016, from https://www.aclu.org/other/yourright-religious-freedom