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Areas for Priority

Development Mixed-use
Commercial centers

DEFINITION

Mixed Use Development - is the


practice of allowing more than one type of
use in a building or set of buildings. In
planning zone terms, this can mean some
combination of residential, commercial,
industrial, office, institutional, or other
land uses.

MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

HISTORY
Throughout most of human history, the majority of human
settlements developed as mixed-use environments. Walking was the
primary way that people and goods were moved about, sometimes
assisted by animals such as horses or cattle. Most people dwelt in
buildings that were places of work as well as domestic life, and made
things or sold things from their own homes. This was particularly true
in cities, and the ground floor of buildings was often devoted to some
sort of commercial or productive use, with living space upstairs.
This historical mixed-used pattern of development declined during
industrialization in favor of large-scale separation of manufacturing
and residences in single-function buildings. This period saw massive
migrations of people from rural areas to cities drawn by work in
factories and the associated businesses and bureaucracies that grew
up around them.

MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

BENEFITS
greater housing variety and density, more affordable housing
(smaller units), life-cycle housing (starter homes to larger homes
to senior housing)
reduced distances between housing, workplaces, retail
businesses, and other amenities and destinations
better access to fresh, healthy foods (as food retail and farmers
markets can be accessed on foot/bike or by transit)
more compact development, land-use synergy (e.g. residents
provide customers for retail which provide amenities for
residents)
stronger neighborhood character, sense of place
walkable, bike-able neighborhoods, increased accessibility via
transit, both resulting in reduced transportation costs

MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

DRAWBACKS
Most development throughout the mid to late 20th century was single-use, so many
development and finance professionals see this as the safer and more acceptable
means to provide construction and earn a profit.
office park and the strip mall, is designed for low density, single use zoning.
short term discounted cash flow has become the standard way to measure the
success of income-producing development, resulting in "disposable" suburban
designs that make money in the short run but are not as successful in the mid to
long term as walkable, mixed use environments.
Mixed-use commercial space is often seen as being best suited for retail and small
offices. This precludes its widespread adoption by large corporations and
government facilities.
Construction costs for mixed-use development currently exceed those for similarly
sized, single-use buildings; challenges include fire separations, sound attenuation,
ventilation, and egress. Additional costs arise from meeting the design needs. In
some designs, the large, high-ceilinged, columnless lower floor for commercial uses
may not be entirely compatible with the smaller scale of the walled residential space
above.

MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

TYPES OF CONTEMPORARY MIXED-USE ZONING


Some of the more frequent mixed-use scenarios in the United States are:
Neighborhood

commercial zoning convenience goods and services, such as convenience stores,


permitted in otherwise strictly residential areas
Main Street residential/commercial two to three-story buildings with residential units above and
commercial units on the ground floor facing the street
Urban residential/commercial multi-story residential buildings with commercial and civic uses on
ground floor
Office convenience office buildings with small retail and service uses oriented to the office workers
Office/residential multi-family residential units within office building(s)
Shopping mall conversion residential and/or office units added (adjacent) to an existing standalone
shopping mall
Retail district retrofit retrofitting of a suburban retail area to a more village-like appearance and mix
of uses
Live/work residents can operate small businesses on the ground floor of the building where they live
Studio/light industrial residents may operate studios or small workshops in the building where they
live
Hotel/residence mix hotel space and high-end multi-family residential
Parking structure with ground-floor retail
Single-family detached home district with standalone shopping center

MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

DEFINITION

Commercial areas in a city are areas, districts, or neighborhoods


primarily composed of commercial buildings, such as a
downtown, central business district, financial district, "Main
Street", commercial strip, or shopping centre. Commercial activity
within cities includes the buying and selling of goods and services
in retail businesses, wholesale buying and selling, financial
establishments, and a wide variety of uses that are broadly
classified as "business." While commercial activities typically take
up a relatively small amount of land, they are extremely important
to a communitys economy. They provide employment, facilitate the
circulation of money, and often serve many other roles important to
the community, such as public gathering and cultural events.

COMMERCIAL AREAS

Neighborhood

Center,
Intermediate or Community-Size Center
Regional Center
Renewal Projects

TYPES OF COMMERCIAL CENTER

a. Neighborhood Center
This is a row of stores customarily in a strip, or line, paralleling the highway and
with parking between the line of storefronts and the highway. Services is by alley
in the rear. Usually contain a supermarket and a drugstore, often a variety stores.
Few have their retail units clustered around an enclosed mini-mall,

b. Intermediate or Community-Size Center


This also is usually a strip of stores but substantially larger than the
neighbourhood centre and containing a so-called junior department store as the
major unit. The parking patter is normally similar to that of the neighbourhood
centre.

c. Regional Center
Contains one (1) to four (4) department stores plus 50 to 100 or more satellite
shops and facilities, all fronting on an internal pedestrian mall, or shopping
walkway. Parking completely surrounds the building group so that all stores face
inward to the mall with their backs to the parking.

d. Renewal Project (Downtown Centre)


A close integration on two or more shopping levels, of department stores, shops of
all sorts, restaurants, etc. The multilevel malls may connect directly or by bridges
to other shopping facilities, hotels, office buildings, theatres, and parking garaged.
Because of the high land cost, parking is multidecking and can be abive or below.
DC is toward a multilevel pattern interconnecting the essential parts of the CBD.

a. Neighborhood Center
This is a row of stores customarily in a strip, or line, paralleling the highway and
with parking between the line of storefronts and the highway. Services is by alley
in the rear. Usually contain a supermarket and a drugstore, often a variety stores.
Few have their retail units clustered around an enclosed mini-mall,

b. Intermediate or Community-Size Center


This also is usually a strip of stores but substantially larger than the
neighbourhood centre and containing a so-called junior department store as the
major unit. The parking patter is normally similar to that of the neighbourhood
centre.

c. Regional Center
Contains one (1) to four (4) department stores plus 50 to 100 or more satellite
shops and facilities, all fronting on an internal pedestrian mall, or shopping
walkway. Parking completely surrounds the building group so that all stores face
inward to the mall with their backs to the parking.

c. Regional Center
Contains one (1) to four (4) department stores plus 50 to 100 or more satellite
shops and facilities, all fronting on an internal pedestrian mall, or shopping
walkway. Parking completely surrounds the building group so that all stores face
inward to the mall with their backs to the parking.

d. Renewal Project (Downtown Centre)


A close integration on two or more shopping levels, of department stores, shops of
all sorts, restaurants, etc. The multilevel malls may connect directly or by bridges
to other shopping facilities, hotels, office buildings, theatres, and parking garaged.
Because of the high land cost, parking is multidecking and can be abive or below.
DC is toward a multilevel pattern interconnecting the essential parts of the CBD.