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Personal Development Plan

Elie Hays
Advanced Practicum
Course 270
Spring Semester, 2016

Long Term Goals

Expand my knowledge and become more informed and better prepared


for treating trauma.

Advocacy-Work with families, lawyers and judges in civil commitment


hearings.

Become a CARF surveyor

Graduate from Drake with a Masters in Mental Health Spring 2017

Become Licensed Mental Health Therapist 2020

Become a Certified Wellness Coach

Short Term Goals

Become an expert in self-care and wellness.

Present a presentation on self-care to the advanced practicum class and


professors using what I have learned in graduate school, skills developed in my
profession and through trainings, interviews and personal experiences.

Use this presentation as a training with co-workers at United Community


Services.

Define the concept of stress

Describe common therapeutic issues counselors encounter in their work.

Describe 5 elements of the PERMA wheel and positive psychology

Describe self-care techniques- balance, grounding, essential oils, meditation and


breathing techniques

WELL BEINGS?

Many of those who enter the helping professions derive both


personal and profession satisfaction from taking care of others.
It is far more than just a job.
they are often reluctant to take care of themselves, sometimes
even feeling guilty about doing so.
This can be a self-defeating, even self-destructive,
misconception.

Taking care of yourself is the best way


to take care of others.

How are you doing????

How Do You Know When You Are


Stressed?

True or False?
All f
orm
s of
stre
ss a
re b
you
Wha
ad f
?
t is
or
th e
op p

osit

e of
Dis t
ress
?

Eustress

Motivates, focuses energy

Is short-term

Is perceived as within our coping abilities

Feels exciting

Improves performance

Butwe are most concerned with stress as a debilitating

and potentially pathogenic, force (distress).

Myself

Family

CoWorkers

Heart Beats I lose


Stomach
things
problems
more often

MY STRESS!

Sweat

Verbally
attempt to
purge
stress

Not enough
sleep

Angry at
self

Get angry
with self

Face get
red

Feel sick

Yell

Thoughts
get all
combined

Shut down

Grind my
teeth

Raises
voice

Get quiet

Missed
work

Act crazy

Clients
Quieter

What Stresses Us Out?

In our Profession, What are Some Difficulties


That Get in the Way of our Wellness?
-Burnout
-Vicarious Trauma
-Countertransference
-Secondary Traumatic Stress

Questions

Never

A few
times
per
year

Once a
month

A few
times per
month

Once a
week

A few times
per week

Everyday

Section A

I feel emotionally drained by my work.


Working with people all day long requires
a great deal of effort.
I feel like my work is breaking me down.
I feel frustrated by my work.

I feel I work too hard at my job.


It stresses me too much to work in direct
contact with people.
I feel like Im at the end of my ropes.
Total score SECTION A

Questions

Never

A few
times
per
year

Once a
month

A few times
per month

Once a
week

A few times
per week

Everyday

SECTION B

I feel I look after certain


patients/clients impersonally, as if
they are objects.
I feel tired when I get up in the
morning and have to face another
day at work.
I have the impression that my
patients/clients make me
responsible for some of their
problems.
I am at the end of my patience at
the
end of my work day.
I really dont care about what
happens to some of my
patients/clients.
I have become more insensitive to
people since Ive been working.
Im afraid that this job is making
me
uncaring.
Total score SECTION B

Questions

Never

A few
times
per
year

Once a
month

A few times
per month

Once a
week

A few times
per week

Everyday

Section C

I accomplish many worthwhile


things
in this job.
I feel full of energy.
I am easily able to understand
what
my patients/clients feel.
I look after my patients/clients
problems very effectively.
In my work, I handle emotional
problems very calmly.
Through my work, I feel that I have
a positive influence on people.
I am easily able to create a relaxed
atmosphere with my
patients/clients.
I feel refreshed when I have been
close to my patients/clients at
work.
Total score SECTION C

SCORING RESULTS - INTERPRETATION


Section A: Burnout

Burnout (or depressive anxiety syndrome): Testifies to fatigue at the very idea of work, chronic fatigue,
trouble sleeping, physical problems. For the MBI, as well as for most authors, exhaustion would be the
key component of the syndrome. Unlike depression, the problems disappear outside work.
Total 17 or less: Low-level burnout*** Total between 18 and 29 inclusive: Moderate burnout***Total over 30: Highlevel burnout
Section B: Depersonalization
Depersonalization (or loss of empathy): Rather a dehumanization in interpersonal relations. The
notion of detachment is excessive, leading to cynicism with negative attitudes with regard to patients or
colleagues, feeling of guilt, avoidance of social contacts and withdrawing into oneself. The professional
blocks the empathy he can show to his patients and/or colleagues.
Total 5 or less: Low-level burnout*** Total between 6 and 11 inclusive: Moderate burnout*** Total of 12 and greater:
High-level burnout
Section C: Personal Achievement
The reduction of personal achievement: The individual assesses himself negatively, feels he is unable to
move the situation forward. This component represents the demotivating effects of a difficult, repetitive
situation leading to failure despite efforts. The person begins to doubt his genuine abilities to accomplish
things. This aspect is a consequence of the first two.
Total 33 or less: High-level burnout*** Total between 34 and 39 inclusive: Moderate burnout***Total greater than
40: Low-level burnout

A high score in the first two sections and a low score in the last section may indicate

Vicarious Trauma
(When we are receiving overwhelming volumes of information that hold an emotional charge in our bodies, minds and spirit.

Exhaustion and Physical


Ailments

Emotional Signs

Constantly feeling tired even after a good nights

Hypersensitivity

sleep

Becoming disconnected from emotions

Physical tension in body

Guilt for having a pretty good life

Sleeping too little or too much

Headaches, back pain and wrist pan

Relationship
Changes

Not separating personal and

Thought Patterns

professional time

Difficulty seeing multiply perspectives


so new solutions

Viewing people as less

Rigid Thinking

Not making a difference

important who are not in the

Questioning, Am I making any

Feeling hopeless about the future

same field

Increased Anger, irritability and

resentment or cynism.

Difficulty relating to other

difference

peoples day to day experiences

comparison to most severe

without comparing to those you

Incidents

serve or yourself

Intrusive thoughts and imagery to the

Seeing danger everywhere and

traumatic material that you hear or

hypervigilance for the safety of

see

those around you

Minimizing the suffering of others in

Beginning to isolate

Vicarious Trauma Continued


Behavioral Shifts

Organizational Indicators

Vicarious Trauma Job


Related stressors

Absenteeism and attrition

Organizational Indicators

Large Caseloads

Avoidance of work an relationships

High Job Turnover

Large percentage of clients who have

Dread activities that you use to enjoy

Low Morale

Using behavior to escape(eating,

Absenteeism

Back to back clients

alcohol and drugs, caffeine, TV,

Job Dissatisfaction

Lack of clinical support

shopping

Organization contagion

Lack of peer support or supervision

Isolation

Reimbursement issues

Time restraints

Few resources in which to refer

Again, personal victimization history

traumatic experiences

that is unresolved

Lack of experience

Lack of coping skills

Secondary Traumatic Stress or Compassion Fatigue

(Trauma-related

stress
reactions and symptoms resulting from exposure to another individuals traumatic experiences, rather than from exposure
directly to a traumatic event).

Countertransference

Therapists response is influenced by their own unresolved issues. May


lead to avoidance or over identification with client and therapist my
take on role rescuer. Begin thinking for the client.

10 Contributors to Well-Functioning
Therapists
1.

Peer support

2.

Stable personal relationship

3.

Supervision

4.

A balanced life

5.

Affiliation with a graduate department or educational institution

6.

Personal psychotherapy

7.

Continuing education

8.

Family of origin as source of personal values

9.

Awareness of cost of impairment

10.

Coping mechanisms (such as vacations, relaxation, rest, exercise, spirituality, and time
spent with friends)

Developing a Self-Care Plan


Workplace

or Professional-Engage in regular supervision or consulting with a more experienced


colleague, set up a peer-support group, attend professional development programs
Physical-Develop a regular sleep routine, aim for a healthy diet, take lunch breaks, go for a walk at lunchtime, take your dog for a walk after work, use your sick leave, get some exercise before/after work regularly
Psychological-Keep a reflective journal, seek and engage in external supervision or regularly consult with
a more experienced colleague, engage with a non-work hobby, turn off your email and work phone outside
of work hours, make time for relaxation, make time to engage with positive friends and family
Emotional-Develop friendships that are supportive, talk to you friend about how you are coping with work
and life demands
Spiritual-Engage in reflective practices like meditation, go to church/mosque/temple, do yoga, reflect with
a close friend for support
Relationships-Prioritize close relationships in your life e.g. with partners, family and children, attend the
special events of your family and friends

Cited http://au.professionals.reachout.com/developing-a-self-care-plan

Whole Person Approach to Self Care


Physical
Psychological
Social
Emotional
Creativity
Intellectual
Spiritual

Holistic Self-Care
Physical-healthy diet, ample sleep, regular exercise, holding and
being held
Mental-training, continuing education, mindful awareness
Emotional- personal therapy, trusting relationships, laughter and
joy, emotional expression, release or redirection of anger
Spiritual-meditation, time spent in nature, creating meaning and purpose
Artistic -purposefully bringing beauty in

PERMA WHEEL
Created by Martin Seligman

ACA Code of Ethics

Section C.2.d

Counselors have a professional responsibility to monitor the their


effectiveness with clients, and those in private practice in particular are
encouraged to seek out peer supervision to evaluate their efficacy

Section C.2.g Impairment

Counselors refrain from offering or accepting professional services when


their physical, mental, or emotional problems are likely to harm a client or
others. They are alert to signs of impairment, seek assistance for their
problems, and if necessary, limit, suspend, or terminate their professional
responsivities.

APA Ethical Principles


It is recommended that Sarah be re-evaluated for the

appropriateProblems
level of careand
if she
encounters any further legal or
Section 2.06 Personal
Conflicts

problems
due to her using.
Psychologists social
refrain
from initiating
an activity when they know or
should know that
is a substantial
likelihood
thatouttheir
personal
. It is there
recommended
that Sarah continue
to reach
to people
problems will prevent them from performing their work-related
recovery, as manner.
it will only benefit her to have a greater sober
activities in a in
competent

support group.
(b) When psychologists
become aware of personal problems that may
interfere with their performing work-related duties adequately, they
take appropriate measures, such as obtaining professional consultation
or assistance, and determine whether they should limit, suspend, or
terminate their work-related duties.

Essential Oils

Frankincense is a wonderful meditation tool that can help if you are having difficulty keeping the rampant mind at bay.
Using Frankincense deepens your meditative practice and helps you to keep focused.

frankincense is an ancient tree resin that has been used for centuries in sacred ceremonies, religious rituals, spiritual
meditation and holistic medicine. It was in widespread use by the Egyptians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Greeks and Romans.

Frankincense resin comes from the Boswellia tree which grows in mainly Africa. To collect the sap, the tree bark is cut and
the sap is allowed to ooze out of the bark. The sap dries on the tree and is then collected.

As incense, the raw chunks of resin are directly set on a heat source, such as hot coals. Burning Frankincense is believed to
affect the crown charka. It helps with meditation by deepening the breath and brining the body and mind into a
harmonious state. There is a quality to the scent of burning Frankincense that seems to reach a forgotten corner of the
mind. It is an exotic, yet familiar smell that can assist in promoting spiritual focus and creativity.

As a medicinal substance Frankincense was thought to cure vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and tumors. It is also used to treat
skin inflammation, headaches and allergies. In China it is used to treat leprosy and gonorrhea. Frankincense is edible and
can also help with digestion. Ayurvedic medicine uses Frankincense for treating arthritis.

Edible Frankincense must be pure for internal consumption. It should be translucent without any impurities. It is often
chewed like gum, but it is stickier because it is a resin.

Frankincense has also been used in Aromatherapy to relieve anxiety and promote a sense of well-being. It is used to
alleviate depression.

Guided Meditation

Reference

Jayawickreme, E., Forgeard, M. C., & Seligman, M. P. (2012). The engine of well-being. Review
Of General Psychology, 16(4), 327-342. doi:10.1037/a0027990

Merriman, J. (2015). Enhancing Counselor Supervision Through Compassion Fatigue


Education. Journal Of Counseling & Development, 93(3), 370-378. doi:10.1002/jcad.12035

Montero-Marin, J., Prado-Abril, J., Piva Demarzo, M. M., Gascon, S., & Garca-Campayo, J.
(2014). Coping with Stress and Types of Burnout: Explanatory Power of Different Coping
Strategies. Plos ONE, 9(2), 1-9. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089090

Rupert, P. A., Miller, A. O., & Dorociak, K. E. (2015). Preventing burnout:What does the research
tell us?. Professional Psychology: Research And Practice, 46(3), 168-174.
doi:10.1037/a0039297

Trauma-Informed care in behavioral health services: a treatment improvement protocol. (2014).

Welfel, E. R. (2013). Ethics in counseling and psychotherapy: Standards, research, and emerging
issues (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA, US: Thomson Brooks/Cole Publishing Co.