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Voltage Divider Rule

The voltage across the resistive elements will divide as the


magnitude of the resistance levels.
Voltage divider rule (VDR) that permits determining the
voltage levels without first finding the current. The rule can be
derived by analyzing the network of Fig.
Example
Determine the voltage V1 for the network of Fig.
Solution:
Example
Using the voltage divider rule, determine the voltages
V1 and V3 for the series circuit of Fig.
Solution:
Example
Design the voltage divider of Fig. such that VR1 = 4VR2.
CURRENT DIVIDER RULE
For two parallel elements of equal value, the current will
divide equally.
For parallel elements with different values, the smaller
the resistance, the greater the share of input current.
For parallel elements of different values, the current will
split with a ratio equal to the inverse of their resistor
values.
Deriving CDR
The input current I equals V/RT, where RT is the total
resistance of the
parallel branches. Substituting V=IxRx into the above
equation, where Ix
refers to the current through a parallel branch of
resistance Rx, we have
Example (Kirchhoff's Current law)
With reference to the network shown in Fig,
determine the relationship between the currents I1,
I2, I4 and I5.
Example (KCL)
For the network shown in Fig, I1 = 2.5 A and I2 =
1.5 A. Calculate the current I3.
Example (KCL)
Write down the current relationships for junctions
a, b and c of the
network shown in Fig. and hence determine the
currents I2, I4
and I5.
Example (KVL)
For the network shown in Fig, determine the
voltages V1 and V3.
Example (CDR)
Find the current I1 for the network of Fig.