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CASE STUDIES IN

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
JENNIFER FRANCE/ EDLE 5000
WHAT IS A CASE STUDY?

A case study is a type of qualitative research that seeks to


Describe one or more cases in depth and answer the questions and/or issues raised by the
study
The very basic and most important question a case study seeks to answer is, What are the
characteristics of this single case or these comparison cases?
CHARACTERISTICS OF CASE STUDIES

Case studies are multidisciplinary, covering all kinds of subject areas from business to
education.
Case studies utilize many modes of data collection, ranging from interviews and
questionnaires to documents to observations.
Case studies often search for trends, themes, and/or patterns in the case data during
analyses. In some cases, they also use cross-case analyses.
Case studies focus on a narrative style of reporting results that includes in depth
description of the context and operational techniques of the study.
WHAT IS A CASE?

A case, according to the text, is a bounded system. It can include a person, people,
systems, or even a process.
For example:
One person
A group of teachers in a single grade
A group of females from the ages of 16-18
Students who have ADHD at a particular school
THERE ARE THREE TYPES OF CASE STUDIES

The interest is only understanding the details of that


Intrinsic
Case Study particular study.

The interest is to understand something more general than


Instrumental
Case Study the case.

The interest is in studying and comparing multiple cases in


Collective
Case Study a single study.
EXAMPLES OF CASE STUDIES IN MY TOPIC OF INTEREST:
THE EFFECTS OF MEDITATION, MINDFULNESS, AND/OR
YOGA ON THE BEHAVIORAL AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS
OF THE SCHOOL COMMUNITY AND ITS CULTURE
In the article, Yoga as a Complementary Therapy for Children and Adolescent: A Guide for
Clinicians, the researchers studied many other studies about the benefits and wrote
about a 13 year-old adolescent who was diagnosed with ADHD and obesity. The
adolescent practiced yoga with his mother regularly and at the end of the study, reported
through interviews that he felt proud of the poses he learned and had also lost weight.
His mother, who practiced with him, also reported an improvement in her IBS symptoms
as a side note.
This article shows the experience of one case, but links its results to many other studies
and suggests generalization of its positive effects across many settings.
EXAMPLES OF CASE STUDIES IN MY TOPIC OF INTEREST:
THE EFFECTS OF MEDITATION, MINDFULNESS, AND/OR
YOGA ON THE BEHAVIORAL AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS
OF THE SCHOOL COMMUNITY AND ITS CULTURE
In the article, Stress Management: A Case Study of Professional Students on Impact of
Meditation and Yoga on Stress Levels, the authors conducted a case study focusing on a
group of graduate students and measuring their response to stress before and after yoga
using questionnaires.
This article did reference other studies to corroborate their findings that stress was
reduced after yoga based on the questionnaires. In this way, though it involved more
participants than the first study, did seem to be a Collective Case Study, referencing and
comparing many studies in one research paper.
EXAMPLES OF CASE STUDIES IN MY TOPIC OF INTEREST:
THE EFFECTS OF MEDITATION, MINDFULNESS, AND/OR
YOGA ON THE BEHAVIORAL AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS
OF THE SCHOOL COMMUNITY AND ITS CULTURE
In the article, Communicating Quietly: Supporting Personal Growth with Meditation and Listening in Schools,
the researcher was interested in the underachievement and exclusion (or suspension/expulsion) of boys
in her community. She chose a school that serviced a high-needs community with little resources. In
this case study, she taught her group of participants how to meditate and then followed it with listening
to them talk about their meditative experiences.
Through this article, she found that the boys responded positively and teachers in the school noticed
behavioral changes. She took observational notes of things that they said while they spoke. This article
was very profound in conveying the need for students to have an outlet to recognize their feelings and
then talk about them in a constructive way with a trusted, trained adult.
This article, unlike the other two, was an Intrinsic Case Study, primarily interested in its own findings.
REFERENCES

Kaley-Isley, L.C., et. al. (2010).Yoga as a complementary therapy for children and
adolescent: A guide for clinicians. Psychiatry, 7(8), p. 20-32.
Reddy, T.L. & Ammani, S. (2013). Stress management: A case study of professional students
on impact of meditation and yoga on stress levels. Journal on Educational Psychology, 6(4), p.
42-47.
Leoni, J. (2006). Communicating quietly: Supporting personal growth with meditation and
listening in schools. Support for Learning, 21(3), p. 121-128.