Sie sind auf Seite 1von 138

SSCTUBE.

COM
He has given me advices.

SSCTUBE.COM
The Indian team defeated the English by innings.

SSCTUBE.COM
I have to tell you two news.

SSCTUBE.COM
The scenery of Kashmir are enchanting.

SSCTUBE.COM
Rule:
Some nouns always take a singular verb Scenery,
advice, machinery, stationery, furniture, abuse, fuel,
rice, gram, issue, bedding, repair, news, mischief,
poetry, business, economics, physics, mathematics,
classics, ethics, athletics, innings, gallows.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some nouns always take a singular verb;
Scenery, advice, machinery, stationery, furniture, abuse,
fuel, rice, gram, issue, bedding, repair, news, mischief,
poetry, business, economics, physics, mathematics,
classics, ethics, athletics, innings, gallows.
He has given me advice.
The Indian team defeated the English by an innings.
I have to tell you two pieces of news.
The scenery of Kashmir is enchanting.

SSCTUBE.COM
The cattle is grazing in the ground.

SSCTUBE.COM
The clergy is in the church

SSCTUBE.COM
The cattle is grazing in the ground.
The cattle are grazing in the ground.
The clergy is in the church
The clergy are in the church.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some nouns are singular in form but they are used as
plural forms and always take a plural verb.
Cattle, gentry, vermin, peasantry, artillery, people,
clergy, police, poultry, electorate.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some nouns are singular in form but they are used as
plural forms and always take a plural verb.
Cattle, gentry, vermin, peasantry, artillery, people,
clergy, police.
The cattle is grazing in the ground.
The cattle are grazing in the ground.
The clergy is in the church
The clergy are in the church

SSCTUBE.COM
Where is my trousers?

SSCTUBE.COM
Spectacles is now a costly item.

SSCTUBE.COM
Where is my trousers?
Where are my trousers?
Spectacles is now a costly item.
Spectacles are now a costly item.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some nouns are always used in the plural form and
always take a plural verb.
Trousers, scissors, spectacles, stockings, shorts,
measles, goods, alms, premises, thanks, annals, tidings,
chattels, etc.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some nouns are always used in the plural form and
always take a plural verb.
Trousers, scissors, spectacles, stockings, shorts,
measles, goods, alms, premises, thanks, annals, tidings,
chattels, etc.
Where is my trousers?
Where are my trousers?
Spectacles is now a costly item.
Spectacles are now a costly item.

SSCTUBE.COM
Its a four years degree course.

SSCTUBE.COM
I have ten dozens of shoes.

SSCTUBE.COM
Its a four years degree course.
Its a four year degree course.

SSCTUBE.COM
I have ten dozens of shoes.
I have ten dozen of shoes.

SSCTUBE.COM
There are some nouns that indicate length, measure,
money, weight, or number. When they are preceded by
a numerical, they remain unchanged in form.
Foot, meter, pair, score, dozen, year, hundred,
thousand, million, etc.

SSCTUBE.COM
There are some nouns that indicate length, measure,
money, weight, or number. When they are preceded by
a numerical, they remain unchanged in form.
Foot, meter, pair, score, dozen, year, hundred,
thousand, million, etc.
Its a four years degree course.
Its a four year degree course.
I have ten dozens of shoes.
I have ten dozen of shoes.

SSCTUBE.COM
The jury was divided in this case.

SSCTUBE.COM
The team have not come as yet.

SSCTUBE.COM
The jury was divided in this case.
The jury were divided in this case.

SSCTUBE.COM
The team have not come as yet.
The team has not come as yet.

SSCTUBE.COM
Collective nouns such as jury, public, team, committee,
government, audience, company, etc. are used both as
singular and plural depending on the meaning. When
these words indicate a unit, the verb is singular,
otherwise the verb will be plural.

SSCTUBE.COM
Collective nouns such as jury, public, team, committee,
government, audience, company, etc. are used both as
singular and plural depending on the meaning. When
these words indicate a unit, the verb is singular,
otherwise the verb will be plural.
The jury was divided in this case.
The jury were divided in this case.
The team have not come as yet.
The team has not come as yet.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some nouns have one meaning in the singular and
another in the plural.
Advice = counsel
advices = information
Air = atmosphere
airs = proud
Authority = command
authorities = persons in power
Iron = metal
irons = chains
Content = satisfaction
SSCTUBE.COM
contents = things contained
Air is necessary for human life.
It is bad to put on airs.

SSCTUBE.COM
One must finish his task in time.

SSCTUBE.COM
One must finish his task in time.
One must finish ones task in time.

SSCTUBE.COM
The pronoun one must be followed by ones.

SSCTUBE.COM
The pronoun one must be followed by ones.
One must finish his task in time.
One must finish ones task in time.

SSCTUBE.COM
Each student must bring their books.

SSCTUBE.COM
Each student must bring their books.
Each student must bring his books.

SSCTUBE.COM
A pronoun must agree with its antecedent in person,
number, and gender.

SSCTUBE.COM
A pronoun must agree with its antecedent in person,
number, and gender.
Every man must bring his luggage. (Correct)
Each of the girls must carry her own bag. (Correct)
All students must do their home work. (Correct)

SSCTUBE.COM
A pronoun must agree with its antecedent in person,
number, and gender.
Every man must bring his luggage. (Correct)
Each of the girls must carry her own bag. (Correct)
All students must do their home work. (Correct)
Each student must bring their books.
Each student must bring his books.

SSCTUBE.COM
Whom do you think won the award?

SSCTUBE.COM
Whom do you think won the award?
Who do you think won the award?

SSCTUBE.COM
Who are you talking to?

SSCTUBE.COM
Who are you talking to?
Whom are you talking to?

SSCTUBE.COM
Who denotes the subject and whom is used for the
object.

SSCTUBE.COM
Who denotes the subject and whom is used for the
object.
Whom do you think won the award?
Who do you think won the award?
Who are you talking to?
Whom are you talking to?

SSCTUBE.COM
Either Ram or Raj will give their book.

SSCTUBE.COM
Either Ram or Raj will give their book.
Either Ram or Raj will give his book.

SSCTUBE.COM
Neither Ramesh nor Suresh has done their work.

SSCTUBE.COM
Neither Ramesh nor Suresh has done their work.
Neither Ramesh nor Suresh has done his work.

SSCTUBE.COM
When two are more singular nouns joined together by
either or ; neither nor and or the pronoun is singular.

SSCTUBE.COM
When two are more singular nouns joined together by
either or ; neither nor and or the pronoun is singular.
Either Ram or Raj will give their book.
Either Ram or Raj will give his book.
Neither Ramesh nor Suresh has done their work.
Neither Ramesh nor Suresh has done his work.

SSCTUBE.COM
Either the engineer or his mechanics failed in his duty.

SSCTUBE.COM
Either the engineer or his mechanics failed in his duty.
Either the engineer or his mechanics failed in their duty.

SSCTUBE.COM
When a singular and a plural noun are joined by or ,
nor the pronoun must be according to closer noun.

SSCTUBE.COM
When a singular and a plural noun are joined by or ,
nor the pronoun must be plural.
Either the engineer or his mechanics failed in his duty.
Either the engineer or his mechanics failed in their duty.

SSCTUBE.COM
What book do you read?

SSCTUBE.COM
What book do you read?
Which book do you read?

SSCTUBE.COM
Whose is used for living persons and which is used for
lifeless objects.

SSCTUBE.COM
Whose is used for living persons and which is used for
lifeless objects.
Which book did you select? (correct)
Whose photograph is lying there? (correct)

SSCTUBE.COM
Whose is used for living persons and which is used for
lifeless objects.
Which book did you select? (correct)
Whose photograph is lying there? (correct)
What book do you read?
Which book do you read?

SSCTUBE.COM
Romeo and Juliet loved one another.

SSCTUBE.COM
Romeo and Juliet loved one another.
Romeo and Juliet loved each another.

SSCTUBE.COM
Those five friends who are sitting there, love each
another.

SSCTUBE.COM
Those five friends who are sitting there, love each
another.
Those five friends who are sitting there, love one
another.

SSCTUBE.COM
All the students of the class are friendly; they love each
another.

SSCTUBE.COM
All the students of the class are friendly; they love each
another.
All the students of the class are friendly; they love one
another.
SSCTUBE.COM
Each other is used when there are two subjects or
objects and one another when there are more than
two.

SSCTUBE.COM
Each other is used when there are two subjects or
objects and one another when there are more than
two.
Romeo and Juliet loved one another.
Romeo and Juliet loved each another.
Those five friends who are sitting there, love each another.
Those five friends who are sitting there, love one another.
All the students of the class are friendly; they love each another.
All the students of the class are friendly; they love one another.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some is used in affirmative sentences to express
quantity or degree.
Any is used in negative or interrogative sentences.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some is used in affirmative sentences to express
quantity or degree.
Any is used in negative or interrogative sentences.
I shall buy some apples. (Correct)
I shall not buy any apples. (Correct)
Have you bought any apples? (Correct)

SSCTUBE.COM
But some may be correctly used in interrogative
sentences which are, in fact, requests.

SSCTUBE.COM
But some may be correctly used in interrogative
sentences which are, in fact, requests.
Will you please give me some milk. (Correct)

SSCTUBE.COM
Some is used in affirmative sentences to express
quantity or degree.
Any is used in negative or interrogative sentences.
I shall read any book.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some is used in affirmative sentences to express
quantity or degree.
Any is used in negative or interrogative sentences.
I shall read any book.
I shall read some book.

SSCTUBE.COM
Some is used in affirmative sentences to express
quantity or degree.
Any is used in negative or interrogative sentences.

Have you bought some apples?

SSCTUBE.COM
Some is used in affirmative sentences to express
quantity or degree.
Any is used in negative or interrogative sentences.

Have you bought some apples?


Have you bought any apples?

SSCTUBE.COM
Some is used in affirmative sentences to express
quantity or degree.
Any is used in negative or interrogative sentences.
I shall read any book.
I shall read some book.
Have you bought some apples?
Have you bought any apples?

SSCTUBE.COM
No less than fifty persons were killed.

SSCTUBE.COM
No less than fifty persons were killed.
No fewer than fifty persons were killed.

SSCTUBE.COM
There are no fewer than five liters of water in the jug.

SSCTUBE.COM
There are no fewer than five liters of water in the jug.
There are no less than five liters of water in the jug.

SSCTUBE.COM
Use of less and fewer
Less denotes quantity and fewer denotes number.

SSCTUBE.COM
Use of less and fewer
Less denotes quantity and fewer denotes number.
No less than fifty persons were killed.
No fewer than fifty persons were killed.
There are no fewer than five liters of water in the jug.
There are no less than five liters of water in the jug.

SSCTUBE.COM
Shelly is junior than Wordsworth.

SSCTUBE.COM
Shelly is junior than Wordsworth.
Shelly is junior to Wordsworth.

SSCTUBE.COM
I prefer reading than sleeping.

SSCTUBE.COM
I prefer reading than sleeping.
I prefer reading to sleeping.

SSCTUBE.COM
Normally than is used in the comparative degree, but
with words like superior, inferior, senior, junior, anterior,
posterior and prefer to is used.

SSCTUBE.COM
Normally than is used in the comparative degree, but
with words like superior, inferior, senior, junior, anterior,
posterior and prefer to is used.
Shelly is junior than Wordsworth.
Shelly is junior to Wordsworth.
I prefer reading than sleeping.
I prefer reading to sleeping.

SSCTUBE.COM
He is stronger than any man.

SSCTUBE.COM
He is stronger than any man.
He is stronger than any other man.

SSCTUBE.COM
He is stronger than any man.
He is stronger than any other man.
Any man includes the man himself and thus the
sentence will be absurd.

SSCTUBE.COM
When a comparison is made by using a comparative
followed by than the word other must be used to
exclude the thing compared form the class of thing with
which it is compared.
He is stronger than any man.
He is stronger than any other man.
Any man includes the man himself and thus the
sentence will be absurd.

SSCTUBE.COM
The climate of Ranchi is better than Gaya.

SSCTUBE.COM
The climate of Ranchi is better than Gaya.
Here the comparison should be between the climate of
Ranchi and the climate of Gaya.
The climate of Ranchi is better than the climate of Gaya.

SSCTUBE.COM
In some cases comparison is subtle and must be given
proper attention.
The climate of Ranchi is better than Gaya.
Here the comparison should be between the climate of
Ranchi and the climate of Gaya.
The climate of Ranchi is better than the climate of Gaya.
The climate of Ranchi is better than that of Gaya.
That of means the climate of

SSCTUBE.COM
Many a man were drowned in the sea.

SSCTUBE.COM
Many a man were drowned in the sea.
Many a man was drowned in the sea.

SSCTUBE.COM
Many a is always followed by a singular verb.
Many a man were drowned in the sea.
Many a man was drowned in the sea.

SSCTUBE.COM
Bread and butter make a good breakfast.

SSCTUBE.COM
Bread and butter make a good breakfast.
Bread and butter makes a good breakfast.

SSCTUBE.COM
When two singular nouns are joined by and point out
the same thing or the person, the verb will be singular.
Bread and butter make a good breakfast.
Bread and butter makes a good breakfast.

SSCTUBE.COM
It is one of the important day in my life.

SSCTUBE.COM
It is one of the important day in my life.
It is one of the important days in my life.

SSCTUBE.COM
One of always plural noun after it.
It is one of the important day in my life.
It is one of the important days in my life.

SSCTUBE.COM
He not only comes for swimming but also for coaching
the learners.

SSCTUBE.COM
He not only comes for swimming but also for coaching
the learners.
He comes not only for swimming but also for coaching
the learners.

SSCTUBE.COM
Use of not only and but also:
He not only comes for swimming but also for coaching
the learners.
He comes not only for swimming but also for coaching
the learners.
The expression not only must be placed before the
right word, otherwise the meaning changes. Here this
expression is meant for swimming and not for coming.

SSCTUBE.COM
I had scarcely entered the room than the phone rang.

SSCTUBE.COM
I had scarcely entered the room than the phone rang.
I had scarcely entered the room when the phone rang.

SSCTUBE.COM
Scarcely and hardly are followed by when and not by
than.
I had scarcely entered the room than the phone rang.
I had scarcely entered the room when the phone rang.

SSCTUBE.COM
Though is poor but he is honest.

SSCTUBE.COM
Though is poor but he is honest.
Though is poor yet he is honest.

SSCTUBE.COM
Though is followed by yet and not by but.
Though is poor but he is honest.
Though is poor yet he is honest.

SSCTUBE.COM
No sooner had I entered the class when the students
stood up.

SSCTUBE.COM
No sooner had I entered the class when the students
stood up.
No sooner had I entered the class than the students
stood up.

SSCTUBE.COM
No sooner is followed by than.
No sooner had I entered the class when the students
stood up.
No sooner had I entered the class than the students
stood up.

SSCTUBE.COM
Read regularly lest you will fail.

SSCTUBE.COM
Read regularly lest you will fail.
Read regularly lest you should fail.

SSCTUBE.COM
Lest must be followed by should.
Read regularly lest you will fail.
Read regularly lest you should fail.

SSCTUBE.COM
Unless you do not work hard, you will not pass.

SSCTUBE.COM
Unless you do not work hard, you will not pass.
Unless you work hard, you will not pass.

SSCTUBE.COM
Unless expresses a condition. It is always used in the
negative sense. Thus not is never used with unless.
Unless you do not work hard, you will not pass.
Unless you work hard, you will not pass.

SSCTUBE.COM
Wait here until I do not return.

SSCTUBE.COM
Wait here until I do not return.
Wait here until I return.

SSCTUBE.COM
Until expresses time. It has a negative sense. Thus not
should never be used with it.
Wait here until I do not return.
Wait here until I return.

SSCTUBE.COM
He behaves as if he was a king.

SSCTUBE.COM
He behaves as if he was a king.
He behaves as if he were a king.

SSCTUBE.COM
As if is used to express a sense of pretension. When as if
is used in this sense, were is used in all cases, even
with the third person singular.
He behaves as if he was a king.
He behaves as if he were a king.

SSCTUBE.COM
He saw that the clock has stopped.

SSCTUBE.COM
He saw that the clock has stopped.
He saw that the clock had stopped.

SSCTUBE.COM
The sense of time and sense
A past tense in the principal clause is followed by a past
tense in the subordinate clause.
He saw that the clock has stopped.
He saw that the clock had stopped.

SSCTUBE.COM
The sense of time and sense
A past tense in the principal clause is followed by a past
tense in the subordinate clause.
Two exceptions:
1)A past tense in the principal clause may followed by a
present tense in the subordinate clause when it
expresses a universal truth.
The teacher observed that the Earth moved round the
Sun.

SSCTUBE.COM
The sense of time and sense
A past tense in the principal clause is followed by a past
tense in the subordinate clause.
Two exceptions:
1)A past tense in the principal clause may followed by a
present tense in the subordinate clause when it
expresses a universal truth.
The teacher observed that the Earth moved round the
Sun.
The teacher observed that the Earth moves round the
Sun.
SSCTUBE.COM
The sense of time and sense
A past tense in the principal clause is followed by a past
tense in the subordinate clause.
Two exceptions:
2) When the subordinate clause is introduced by than,
even there is past tense in the main clause, it may be
followed by any tense required by the sense in the
subordinate clause.
He helped him more than he helped his own children.

SSCTUBE.COM
The sense of time and sense
A past tense in the principal clause is followed by a past
tense in the subordinate clause.
Two exceptions:
2) When the subordinate clause is introduced by than,
even there is past tense in the main clause, it may be
followed by any tense required by the sense in the
subordinate clause.
He helped him more than he helped his own children.
He helped him more than he helps his own children.

SSCTUBE.COM
SSCTUBE.COM