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BULIMIA NERVOSA Jhomz Alvarez

DEFINITION
Bulimia Nervosa, commonly called bulimia, is a serious,
potentially life-threatening eating disorder. People with
bulimia may secretly binge eating large amounts of food
and then purge, trying to get rid of the extra calories in an
unhealthy way.
For example, someone with bulimia may force vomiting or
engage in excessive exercise. Sometimes people purge after
eating only a small snack or a normal size meal.
BULIMIA CAN BE CATEGORIZED IN TWO WAYS:
Purging Bulimia- You regularly self-induce
vomiting or misuse laxatives , diuretics or enemas
after bingeing.
Non-Purging Bulimia- You use other methods to
rid yourself of calories and prevent weight gain,
such a fasting, strict dieting or excessive exercise.
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
Being preoccupied with your body shape and weight.
Living in fear of gaining weight.
Feeling that you cant control your eating behaviour.
Eating until the point of discomfort or pain.
Eating much more food in a binge episode than in a normal meal or snack.
Forcing yourself to vomit or exercise too much to keep from gaining weight after bingeing.
Misusing laxatives, diuretics, or enemas after eating.
Restricting calories or avoiding certain foods between binges.
Using dietary supplements or herbal products excessively for weight loss.
CAUSES
The exact cause of bulimia is UNKNOWN.
There are many factors that could play a role in
the development of eating disorders, including
biology, emotional health, societal expectations
and other issues.
RISK FACTORS
Being Female
Age
Biology
Psychological and Emotional issues
Media and Societal pressure
Sports, Work or Artistic pressures
TREATMENT AND DRUGS
Psychotherapy- also known as talk therapy or psychological counselling, involves discussing your bulimia
and related issues with a mental health provider. Evidence indicates that these types of psychotherapy help
improve symptoms of bulimia:
Cognitive Behavioral therapy- to help identify unhealthy, negative beliefs and behaviours and replace
them with healthy, positive ones.
Family-based therapy- to help parents intervene to stop their teenagers unhealthy eating behaviours, then
to help the teen regain control over his or her own eating, and lastly to help the family deal with problems
that bulimia can have on the teens development and the family.
Interpersonal Psychotherapy-which addresses difficulties in your close relationships, helping to improve
your communication and problem-solving skills.