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Active Suspension Systems

Anthony Griffin
Bradley Rouse
Philip Woodward

MAE 442
Dr. Klang
5/6/2005
Outline

Common Types of
Suspensions
Active Suspensions
Benefits
Disadvantages
Applications
Conclusion
Common Suspensions

Front Suspension Rear Suspension


Solid I-Beam Non Independent

Twin I-Beam Rear Leaf Springs


MacPherson Strut Non Independent

Short-Long Arm Rear Coil Springs


Trailing Arm

Beam
Solid I-Beam

Used on trucks and other


large vehicles
Economical
Simple design
Low Maintenance
Excellent load capacity
Non-independent design
Uncomfortable ride
quality
Poor handling
Twin I-Beam

Found on many Ford


trucks
Forged, cast, or
stamped axles
Excellent load capacity
Requires special
equipment for alignment
adjustments
MacPherson Strut

One of the most


popular systems
One Control Arm
Ideal for front wheel
drive
Light weight
Economical
Good ride quality and
handling characteristics
Used for both front and
rear suspensions
Short-Long Arm

Independent design
Uses an upper and a
lower control arm
Uses either torsion
bars or coil springs
Good ride quality and
handling
characteristics
Heavy and complex
design requires a lot of
space
Rear Leaf Springs

Non-independent
design
Similar to front solid
I-beam axle
Large load carrying
capacity
Rear Coil Springs

Non-independent
design
Uses coils and
control arms instead
of leaf springs
Good load carrying
capacity
Trailing Arm

Independent Design
Uses individual
lower control arms
Uses coil springs
and shocks
Good ride quality
Rear Beam

Non-independent
design
Stamped beam
axles
Uses coil springs
and trailing arms
Light and simple
design
Active Suspension Systems

Bose Suspension Magneto-Rheological


Technology
Bose Suspension System

Electromagnetic
motors at each wheel
instead of traditional
shocks and struts.
Sensors at various
locations to detect
body and suspension
movement.
Comparison of Factory-Installed and Bose
Suspensions: Body Motion on Bump
Course
Bose Suspension System

Uses sensor measurements to instantaneously


counteract road forces
Produces excellent ride quality and superior
control in the same system
Bose Suspension Components

Linear Electromagnetic Motor


Responds quickly enough to counter the effects of bumps and road
irregularities
Power Amplifier
Sends power to the motor during extension and returns power during
retraction
Control Algorithms
Observe sensor measurements and send commands to the power
amplifiers
Bose vs. Stock Suspension
Magneto-Rheological Technology

Dampers contain magnetic particles


suspended in fluid
Magnetic field within the fluid aligns particles
Creates resistance to movement and
increases damping
Variable magnetic field creates more or less
resistance as needed
System can change up to 1000 times per
second
Benefits

Bose Suspension Magnetic Ride Control


Superior comfort Improved road handling
Superior control Improved wheel control
Reduces body roll during Smoother ride than
turns conventional shocks and
Reduces need for camber struts
roll during turns Reduces noise and
Requires only 1/3 of the virbations
power needed by the AC Continuous range of
Wider damping range than damping
Magneto-Rheological
systems
Disadvantages

High initial cost


High repair costs
Complex systems
Applications

Bose Suspension Magnetic Ride Control


System will be offered Currently offered on
on high end luxury Cadillac SRX and Seville
vehicles within the STS models.
next 5 years. Offered on the Chevrolet
The same technology Corvette for the 2003
has been applied in model year.
Military applications. Mercedes S600
BMW 7 series
Active Military Application
Conclusion

Active control suspensions offer a


wider range of comfort and control
than most current suspension
systems.
Offers unmatched vehicle handling
performance.
May eventually find their way into
more common production vehicles.