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The Handbook of Logistics and

Distribution Management
By Alan Rushton, Phil Croucher and Peter Baker

Figures and Tables: part 1


Figure 1.1 A flow representation of logistics for a fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG)
manufacturer. This shows the key components, the major flows and some of the different
logistics terminology

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p5
Figure 1.2 The key components of distribution and logistics, showing some of
the associated detailed elements

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p6
Cost as Percentage of Turnover
Table 1.1 Logistics costs as a percentage
Main Company Business Transport Warehouse/Dep Inventory Administration Cost Overall of sales turnover
Cost ot Cost Investment/Holdi Logistics
ng Cost Cost
% %
% % %
Office equipment 3.20 10.70 0.87 14.77

Health supplies 1.36 9.77 0.66 0.19 11.98

Soft drinks 2.53 2.71 0.44 5.68

Beer (food and drink) 8.16 2.82 0.56 2.19 13.74

Spirits distribution 0.37 0.27 0.07 0.10 0.81

Cement 25.20 9.10 7.10 4.60 46.00


Automotive parts 2.07 6.35 1.53 9.96

Gas supply (non-bulk) 9.41 2.45 0.02 11.98

Computer maintenance 0.45 0.10 0.29 0.05 0.88

Computer supply 0.65 0.78 0.09 1.52

Healthcare 0.96 1.08 1.21 3.25

Specialist chemicals 7.23 1.95 0.20 0.49 9.87


Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P.
Fashion 0.38 1.31 0.33 2.02 (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Food packaging 3.14 3.73 0.85 7.72 Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan
SOURCE: Benchmark survey of UK companies by Dialog Consultants Ltd
Page, London, p13
Figure 1.4 A typical physical flow of material from suppliers through to customers, showing stationary
functions and movement functions, linked to a diagram that reflects the value added nature of
logistics

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p15
Figure 2.1 Some potential trade-offs in logistics, showing how different company
functions might be affected

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics


and Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p19
Figure 2.2 Logistics planning hierarchy

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p20
Figure 2.3 The major functions of the different planning time horizons

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p21
Figure 2.4 Some of the main logistics elements for the different planning
time horizons

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p22
Figure 2.5 The planning and control cycle

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p23
Figure 2.6 The many ways in which logistics can provide an impact on an
organizations return on investment

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p24
Figure 2.7 The logistics implications of different competitive positions

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p29
Figure 3.1 Core product versus product surround, illustrating the importance
of the logistics-related elements

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p34
Figure 3.2 The seven rights of customer service, showing the main service classifications

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p35
Figure 3.3 The constituent parts of total order fulfilment cycle time

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p38
Figure 3.6 An overall approach for establishing a customer service
strategy

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p42
Figure 3.7 Different types of customer service study

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management,
6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p43
Figure 3.8 The advantages and disadvantages of different survey approaches

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p44
Figure 3.9 Rating table for selected customer service factors

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p45
Figure 3.10 Company competitiveness at current service levels Target
Chart

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p46
Figure 3.11 Competitive benchmarking showing opportunities for improving
service when comparisons are made with customer requirements and the
performance of key competitors

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p47
Figure 3.12 A practical example of gap analysis

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p48
Figure 3.13 The relationship between the level of service and the cost
of providing that service

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics


and Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p49
Figure 3.14 Radar gram showing the perfect order targets and
achievements

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics


and Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p52
Figure 4.1 Alternative distribution channels for consumer products to
retail stores

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p58
Figure 4.2 A typical channel of distribution, also showing the difference
between the physical and the trading channel

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management, 6th Edition,
Kogan Page, London, p62
Figure 4.3 Long and short distribution channels

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p65
Figure 4.4 An approach to designing a channel structure

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p66
Figure 5.3 Fourth-party logistics, showing the main areas of service that
could be provided

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and
Distribution Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p81
Figure 5.4 The different characteristics that distinguish freight
exchanges from each other

Source: Rushton, A, Croucher, P. & Baker, P. (2017) The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution
Management, 6th Edition, Kogan Page, London, p85