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Transitive, Intransitive, and

Linking Verbs

So, you wanna know what they


are? Here goes..
Transitive Verbs
A transitive verb is an action verb. It
requires a direct object to complete its
meaning. In other words, the action of
the verb is transferred to the object
directly.

Explanation
Todetermine whether a verb is
transitive, ask whether the action is
done to someone or something. Does
someone or something receive the
action of the verb. If it does, then the
verb is transitive and the person or thing
that receives the action is the direct
object.
Examples
In the following sentences, the transitive verb is bold and the direct
object is underlined.

The judge sentences the man to five


years in prison. (The subject (the judge)
applies an action (sentences) to a direct
object (the man).
Try these:
The
attorney has revealed the bad
news.
Who is the subject?
What is the action being performed?

To whom or what? (the direct object)


Lets try the next sentence:
The defendant could not provide an
alibi.
Who is the subject
What action is transmitted?

What is the direct object?


To locate the direct object.
Answer The subject did something to
whom?
Prosecutors charge people.
The knifes sharp edge cut the chef.
Law enforcement had previously convicted
the man. (identify the action and the direct
object.)
Prosecutors charged him under a habitual
offender statute.
Locating the direct object
Answer The subject did something to
what?
The jury deliberated the case for 48
minutes.
The technician made a joke.

A local woman is seeking a seat on the city


council. ( identify action and direct object)
Intransitive Verbs

How is an intransitive verb


different from a transitive verb?
Arent they both action verbs????
Intransitive Verbs
An intransitive verb is an action verb,
but it does not have a direct object. The
action ends rather than being
transferred to some person or object or
is modified by an adverb or adverb
phrase. (Typically, an adverb or
prepositional phrase modifies an
intransitive verb or the verb ends the
sentence.
How will I know if the verb is
intransitive?
Askwhether or not the action is done is
some way, in some direction, or to some
degree. (Notice, this sounds like the
function of an adverb!)
Examples:
The man decided against a plea
bargain. (The man is the subject) What
did he do? (decided) in what particular
way? (against) Notice that (against a
plea bargain) is a prepositional phrase.
He refused because of his immaturity,
not his lack of morals.
More examples:
Alice complained bitterly. (Notice that
this sentence ends with an adverb.)
At the end of the Roaring 20s, the
incarceration index rose slightly.
(identify the intransitive verb and its
modifier)
When faced with the problem, the
scholar paused.
Remember:
The adverb or prepositional phrase
answers a question about the verb:
The subject did something WHERE?
IfCharlie had run into the street, he would
have been injured.
In 1973, the incarceration number inched
upward.
Remember (continued)
The subject did something WHEN?
Thousands of cranes will return in the
spring.
The number climbed in 1974 and in 1975.

Try this one:


Walter Payton died near the end of the century.
The companys leader collapsed during the
meeting.
Continued.
The
subject did something HOW or TO
WHAT DEGREE?
The statistics come in any form you like.
Politicians and the public are complaining
loudly.
Try these:
His blood pressure kept climbing steadily.
She worked with care and precision.
Yet again
The subject did something WHY?
Our elected officials listen because we
vote.
Danas grades improved with the help of a
tutor.
Try these:
Germanys expedition leader collapsed from
the effort.
Elise competed for her family.
Finally. Linking Verbs.
A linking verb implies a state of being or
condition for the subject, not action. It
links the subject to a noun, pronoun, or
adjective in a sentence. (The subject
may be linked to a predicate nominative
a noun or pronoun, or a predicate
adjective.) Linking verbs restate the
subject or they may be equivalent to the
subject.
Examples:
The test indicates that Sara is a genius.
is= linking verb, genius = predicate
nominative
Toni Morrison was the first African-
American woman to win the Nobel Peace
Prize.
Try these:
Roads were a slushy mess on Monday
along parts of the East Coast.
It was a sad day.
The robbery victim pointed and yelled,
That is he.
Before the show, Ahmad seemed
nervous.
Keep in mind.
Sometimes the modifiers following a linking
verb may answer the question what as a
direct object does for a transitive verb, they
do not receive any action.
In federal courts nowadays, every sentence is the
same. (We can ask: Every sentence is what? and
the answer is THE SAME. But the same is not
receiving the action of the verb as with a transitive
verb. Same is restating or indicating the state of
being of SENTENCE.
Another example:
Female inmates are the fastest-growing
subpopulation in prison.
(Inmates are what? Answer:
subpopulation. But the subpopulation
is not being acted upon, it is reinstating
or indicating the state of being of the
WOMEN.)
Common Linking Verbs
APPEAR PROVE
BECOME REMAIN
FEEL SEEM
GET SMELL
GROW SOUND
SIT TASTE
LOOK TURN
Hold on just a minute
Many verbs can be linking, transitive, or
intransitive depending on their function.
Examples:
Linking: The nations mood turned sour.
(The subject is not engaged in an action.
Turned links mood with a state of being sour.
Next
More examples.
Transitive: The judge turned the pages
quickly.
(The subject was engaged in the action
(turned) and that action was transferred to an
object (pages)
And finally.
Intransitive
The lawyer turned suddenly toward the
back of the courtroom.
The subject was engaged in an action (turned)
and that action was done in a particular way
(suddenly) but not to someone or something.
Viola!
Now lets practice.
TURN TO PAGE 19. Complete Exercise
11.