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Transformasi Tegangan & Regangan

Apply stress transformation equations to plane stress situations to determine any stress
component at a point.

Apply the alternative Mohr's circle approach to perform plane stress transformations.

Use transformation techniques to identify key components of stress, such as principal


stresses.

Extend Mohr's circle analysis to examine three-dimensional states of stress.

Examine theories of failure for ductile and brittle materials.

Analyze plane stress states in thin-walled pressure vessels.

Extend Mohr's circle analysis to examine the transformation of strain.


Examine methods for
determining maximum stresses
and strains at any point in a
structure.

Three of these components, sx , sy , and sz , are the normal stresses exerted on


the faces of a small cubic element centered at Q with the same orientation as the
coordinate axes (Fig. 7.1a). The other three, txy , tyz , and tzx , are the
components of the shearing stresses on the same element.
Our discussion of the transformation of stress will deal mainly with plane stress, i.e., with a situation in
which two of the faces of the cubic element are free of any stress. If the z axis is chosen perpendicular
to these faces, sz = tzx = tzy =0, and the only remaining stress components are sx , sy , and txy (Fig. 7.2).

This situation occurs in a thin plate subjected to forces acting in the mid-plane of the plate (Fig. 7.3). It
also occurs on the free surface of a structural element or machine component where any point of the
surface of that element or component is not subjected to an external force
Our discussion of the transformation of stress will deal mainly with plane stress, i.e., with a situation in
which two of the faces of the cubic element are free of any stress. If the z axis is chosen perpendicular
to these faces, sz = tzx = tzy =0, and the only remaining stress components are sx , sy , and txy (Fig. 7.2).

This situation occurs in a thin plate subjected to forces acting in the mid-plane of the plate (Fig. 7.3). It
also occurs on the free surface of a structural element or machine component where any point of the
surface of that element or component is not subjected to an external force
A state of plane stress at a given point Q is characterized by the stress components sx , sy , and txy
associated with the element shown in Fig. 7.5a. Components sx, sy, and txy associated with that element
after it has been rotated through an angle u about the z axis (Fig. 7.5b) will then be determined. Below, the
value qp of q will be found, where the stresses sx and sy are the maximum and minimum stresses.

These values of the normal stress are the principal stresses at point Q, and the faces of the corresponding
element define the principal planes of stress at that point. The angle of rotation qs for which the shearing
stress is maximum also is discussed.