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DEFINITION

Pronouns to show people or something that is not specific. There are several
pronouns in this form that are often used : many, all, none, one, any, several,
someday and so on. All the pronouns work to replace noun . The pronoun in the
indefinite pronoun is not necessarily dependent on the context.

This English pronoun is not specifically referring to one or more persons. The pronoun
may be singular or plural depending on the number of verbs. These various pronouns
are numerous, but there are several types of indefinite pronouns that are often used
In the following to replace noun.
LISTS OF WORDS AND EXAMPLES OF
INDEFINITE PRONOUN SENTENCES OF
SINGULAR WORDS (UNCOUNTABLE NOUN)
1. No one can tell where is my father.

2. Nobody came to my seminar last day.

3. I give this book to someone special.

4. Everyone can sing well.

5. One of my favorite song is from Brunno Mars.


Anyone, another, anybody, no one, no body, someone, everybody, somebody and no
one are indefinite pronoun refers to uncountable noun for people. The words are
specifically used for pronouns only.

Each, everything, nothing, either, neither, one anything are indefinite pronoun refers
to a countable noun for a thing or a particular thing.
INDEFINITE PRONOUN PLURAL (COUNTABLE
NOUN)
1. There are several people in the meeting room. (terdapat
beberapa orang didalam ruangan rapat)
2. All have done very well. (semuanya sudah dikerjakan dengan
baik)
3. Both of my father and my brother are smart. (ayahku dan
saudara laki-lakiku keduanya pintar)
4. Many room are available for visitor. (banyak ruangan tersedia
untuk pengunjung)
5. Few people are in the restaurant for lunch. (beberapa orang ada
di restoran untuk makan siang)
GENDER ISSUES ON INDEFINITE PRONOUN

On the gender issue of the indefinite pronoun is that which occurs in many nouns for
people. Noun for that person is everybody, everyone, anyone, anybody, somebody
and someone who is sometimes followed by subjective possessive and objective. So
this gender issue does not refer to a particular gender. Then to overcome the gender
problem in indefinite noun by using reflexive pronoun, that is his or her, him or hers,
he or she and himself or herself. Reflexive pronoun is a pronoun for people or animals
and returns to the subject. Reflexive pronouns are used instead of people or animals
of gender issues in indefinite pronouns.
LISTS OF REFLECTIVE PRONOUN
1. I feel myself better today. (saya merasa diriku lebih baik hari ini)

2. He loves himself. (dia mencintai dirinya sendiri)

3. My dog licks itself. (anjingku menjilati dirinya sendiri)

4. Why do you hate yourself? (mengapa kamu membensi dirimu sendiri?)

5. She keeps herself slim. (dia menjaga dirinya tetap langsing)

6. They dont hit themselves. (mereka tidak memukul diri mereka sendiri)
RELATIVE PRONOUNS
Relative Pronoun is the pronoun to form a relative clause (subordinate clause that
describes noun in the main clause of a complex sentence). Relative pronoun can be
used as subject, object or possessive ini relative clause not for number (singular or
plural) or gender (male or female).

Relative pronoun is part of a relative clause that can not stand alone, but is in a
complex sentence. While complex sentence is a combination of independent clause
(whole sentence) and subordinate clause (relative clause). More details can be seen
in the following formula.

Relative Clause = Relative Pronoun +/- Subject +


Verb

Complex Sentence = Independent Clause +


Relative Clause
WISHES
We use past tense forms to talk about wishes:
We use past tense modals would and could to talk about wishes for
the future:
I dont like my work. I wish I could get a better job.
Thats a dreadful noise. I wish it would stop.
I always have to get home early. I wish my parents would let me stay out
later.
We use past tense forms to talk about wishes for the present:
I dont like this place. I wish I lived in somewhere more interesting.
These seats are very uncomfortable. I wish we were travelling first class.
Everyone wishes they had more free time.
John wishes he wasnt so busy.
I wish it wasnt so cold.
We use the past perfect to talk about wishes for the past:
I wish I had worked harder when I was at school.
Mary wishes she had listened to what her mother told her.
I wish I hadnt spent so much money last month.
HYPOTHESES (THINGS THAT WE IMAGINE)
When we are talking about hypotheses:
We use present tense forms after phrases like what if, in
case and suppose to talk about the future if we think it is likely to
happen:
- Those steps are dangerous. Suppose someone has an accident.
- We should leave home early in case we are late.

We use a past tense form to talk about


the future after suppose and what if to suggest something is not likely to
happen:
- It might be dangerous. Suppose they got lost.
- What if he lost his job. What would happen then?

We use modals would, could for a hypothesis about the future:


- We cant all stay in a hotel. It would be very expensive.
- Drive carefully. You could have an accident.
THANK
YOU . !!!

SEE YOU NEXT TIME