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Different Classification of

Feedstuff
(Based on Origin)
The origin or parent materials
may be one of three types:
 Plants
-specific (barley, oats, coconut, soybeans)
-non specific (cereals, grass, meadow)
 Animals
-specific (cattle, chickens, swine)
-non specific (animal, poultry, fish)
 Minerals, chemical products, drugs and others.
For specific plants and animals, each descriptor of
this facet is composed of:
-scientific name
-common name
 Feeds should be described by their
common names at up to three levels as
far as this is possible. The first level
should be the generic name; e.g., cattle,
fish, clover, wheat, etc. The second level
should be more specific (such as breed or
kind); e.g., Hereford, cod red (clover),
winter (wheat), etc. The third level
should list other important characteristics
(such as strain; e.g., Delmar) (see Table
1).
Part Fed to Animals as Affected by Process (es).
 This component of the feed description
represents the actual part of the parent material
fed. In the past, the edible parts of plants and
animals were obvious such as leaves, stems,
seeds, meat trimmings, or bones. Today, due to
the extensive fractionation of plant seeds and
the reconstitution of many of the parts into
new processed foods, innumerable by-products
are available for animal feeding.
Each part has to be described unambiguously
by a descriptor, the use of which is defined as
far as necessary.
Table 1
Feed Description: Origin
(Examples)
With Specific Origin
genus Bos Gadus Trifolium Triticum
species Taurus Morrhua Pratense Aestivum
Level 1 Cattle Fish Clover Wheat
generic name
Level 2 breed Hereford Cod Red Winter
or kind
Level 3 strain - - - Delmar
With Non Specific Origin
Level 1 Animal Grass Poultry Meadow
generic name plants
Level 2 breed - - - -
or kind
Level 3 strain - - - -
Table 2
Feed Description: Origin + Part (Examples)
genus Bos Gadus Trifolium Triticum
species Taurus Morrhua Pratense Aestivu
m
generic Cattle Fish Clover Wheat
breed or Hereford Cod Red Winter
kind
strain - - - Delmar
part Milk Whole Aerial Grain
part
Process and Treatment
 Many processes may be used in the
preparation of a feed for consumption and
some of these may significantly alter their
nutritional value. Heat may damage some
nutrients and, conversely, it may make
others nutritionally more available.
Pelleting increases consumption while
grinding may affect digestibility of protein
and carbohydrates.
It is important, then, that a feeder be
aware of the processes to which a feed
has been subjected. Also, the type of
animal and its physiology must be
considered relative to these factors.
Therefore, origin and part terms are
followed by those distinguishing the
different methods of processing which
are used alone or combined; such as
separating, reducing size or thermal.
Table 3 Feed Description: Origin
+ Part + Process (Examples)
genus Bos Gadus Trifolium Triticum
species Taurus Morrhua Pratense Aestivum
generic Cattle Fish Clover Wheat
breed or Hereford Cod Red Winter
kind
strain - - - Delmar
part Milk Whole or Aerial part Grain
cuttings
process Boiled Mech Extd Ensiled Ground
Dehy
Ground
Stage of Maturity or Development.
 Although stage of maturity may be
unimportant or may not even apply to
many feeds such as grain by-products, it is
probably the most important factor
influencing the nutritive value of forages.
There is an optimal stage of maturity for
forage crops beyond which lignification or the
reduction of the ratio of leaf to stem greatly
reduces digestibility. Examples of
International Feed Descriptions with stage of
maturity for plants and animals are given in
Table 4.