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T YLER’S MODELBY

S YA Z A N A A Z M A N
AQILAH RIDZUAN
AT I Q A H I S A
NADIAH HUSSEIN
OBJECTIVE
• The Tyler Model emphasizes consistency among OBJECTIVES, LEARNING EXPERIENCES, and
OUTCOMES.
• Attended to objective or learning outcome.
• Based on pupil type (eg. weak, average, excellent, having learning problems), subject or course
(e.g. Social Science) and Societal needs (eg. jobs market, unity, patriotism)

Types of
students

Societal Subject
Needs /Courses
SELECTING LEARNING EXPERIENCE
• Establising learning experience
• Educational experiences should be

SPECIFIC
EXPLICIT
MEASURABLE
GROUNDED IN EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY
BASED ON PUPIL’S PRIOR KNOWLEDGE
ORGANIZATION
• How can learning experiences be organized for effective instruction?
– Organizing VERTICALLY (built upon previous learning experience) and
HORIZONTALLY (reinforced by activities in other subjects)
– Incorporate both in 3 CRITERIA: continuity, sequence, and integration
– CONTINUITY: learning is needed for advancement
– SEQUENCE: based on level of student development
– INTEGRATION: learning has a function (to learn other about
other things)
EVALUATION
• How can the effectiveness of learning experiences be evaluated?
– Curriculum evaluation is the process of matching initial expectations in the
form of behavioral objectives with outcomes achieved by the learner.
– Things to consider:
• If there is change in student behavior according to formulated
goals
• Use more than one assessment tool.
– Evaluation should be used as feedback and is important for
improvement
– Don’t forget to cater for uniqueness of different students.
ADVANTAGES OF TYLER’S MODEL
• Straightforward and structured
– begins with stating the objectives
• Clearly defined
– Objectives are stated explicitly in the purpose
• Organized
– Model is orderly as it adheres to a step by step process
• Practical
– as it portrays the actual process of curriculum development
CRITICISM FOR TYLER’S
MODEL
1. Narrowly interpreted objectives ; It sees curriculum development as a fixed, linear process

2. Difficult and time consuming construction of behavioural objectives

3. It fails to consider the changing environment

4. Curriculum restricted to a constricted range of student skill and knowledge; limiting what
students can learn

5. It doesn’t consider that not all learning outcomes can be measured; Critical thinking,
problem solving and value acquiring process cannot be plainly declared in behavioural
objectives
CONT.

5. Does not have a feedback mechanism to allow correction

6. LEARNING EXPERIENCE ARE PERSONAL BASED ON THE INDIVIDUAL; NOT


CONSTRAINED BY THE TEACHER'S AUTHORITY TO SELECT - teacher however can control
learning experience by manipulating the environment