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Reality Driven Research

Marketing Research &


Consultancy
Specialised in Sensory
Research

26/11/2009 Johan Puttemans– Research Director Rogil

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Agenda

1. Who we are

2. BehaviouralResearch - Eye-Tracking

Print ads Pack &


Email Websites
Outdoor Shopper

3. Sensory Research

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Agenda

1. Who we are

2. BehaviouralResearch - Eye-Tracking

Print ads Pack &


Email Websites
Outdoor Shopper

3. Sensory Research

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Partnerships and innovation are key drivers of Rogil

This philosophy - since 1974 - resulted in state-of-the-art


research solutions and specialized tools
Eye Tracking * Tachistoscopic * Sensory Research
used in combination with traditional research techniques.

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ROGIL

Field & Operations Solutions Research &


Cati
& Methods Consultancy
Sense-Pack® (Pack Audit) Sensory Consultancy
Mobile Unit
Sense-it® (Sensory Audit) Marketing Research
Taste Lab
Eye-Watch Solutions
FTF services
Panel services EyeTracking Consumer experience
consultancy
Tachistoscope
Online research Knowledge sharing
Sensory Lab
Fieldwork in Europe
(via Askia software Trained Panels
platform)
Consumer Panels

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OUR VISION ON RESEARCH

Complete solutions beyond Qualitative & Quantitative


& behavioural data/objectives measures

added
QUALITATIVE value QUANTITATIVE

added added
value value
Behavioural
Data
Objective
Measures

The answer to your challenge


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Marketing & Sensory - Research Solutions

Product and concept research

 Concept & Product Research (taste, touch, see ,hear & smell):
 Advanced taste tests (Repeated Measures)
 Sniff tests
 Difference tests
 Screening tests
 Sense-it® = Sensory Audit - sensory examination audit
tests
 HUT – home usage tests
 COB – package studies

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Marketing & Sensory - Research Solutions

Brand Research

Communication, brand, image & advertising research:


Impact measurement via mixed mode research

Marketing ROI optimisation

Pricing and value optimization

Brand Equity diagnostics

Communication ROI optimisation

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Marketing & Sensory - Research Solutions

Packaging & Shopper Research

Packaging, & shopper research, category management


Sense-Pack

Usage & attitude studies (laddering techniques)

Category management & shelf layout research

Search trees & decision trees

Shopper diagnostics: motivations, behaviour in shop

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Marketing & Sensory - Research Solutions

TOOLS & DATACOLLECTION

ONLINE
FACE TO FACE
CATI
CENTRAL LOCATION
CITY CENTERS & RETAIL OUTLETS
IN SHOP/IN STORE
IN HOME

BOTH QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE FLAVOURED WITH


BEHAVIOURAL DATA THROUGHOUT EUROPE

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Some recent references…

FMCG

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Some recent references…

MEDIA SERVICES

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Agenda

1. Who we are

2. Behavioural Research - Eye-Tracking

Print ads Pack &


Email Websites
Outdoor Shopper

3. Sensory Research

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Technology….opportunity or threat?
Also for research ?

Technology is a gift of God. After the gift of life it is perhaps


the greatest of God's gifts. It is the mother of civilizations, of
arts and of sciences.” (Freeman Dyson)

For a list of all the ways technology has failed to improve


the quality of life, please press three. (Alice Kahn)

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A growing pool of data…..

???
???
Textmining
GPS
??? …..STB Clickstreaming
Eye Tracking …..

??? Facial coding CATI
CAPI
Desk
Research
Blogging CAWI …
Mood

??? Mystery
Shopping
… boards
Focus
RFID Groups
… FTF
….. interviews

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Source: Robert van Ossenbruggen - ProCression
Information area &
knowledge economy

300.000 KM
It would reach the moon / equals 7,5 times perimeter Earth

5,7 MillionYears to read it all!!!!

Need for techniques to help


us with processing this info
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A problem for us, analysts ….

Available Data
AVAILABLE

Knowledge
DATA

Gap
Analytical
Capacity
Executive Execution
Gap
Capacity

TIME
Source: Gareth Herschel,
We seeResearch Director, Gartner Inc.,
things differently
Gartner Business Intelligence Summit 2005 17
Tachistoscopic Research

d to expose stimuli for very short time periods (as from 1 millise

tachi: measure shelf impact of your package, Point of Sale mate

Single object tachi: measure impact of a single object

Goal = get detailed information about speed, accuracy,


sequence in terms of how information transmitted by the
stimuli is processed.

Measuring the impact of visual stimuli


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Where do we put text, where do we put visual
information ?

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Are these cellular phones
Nokia phones or
Ericsson phones?
Is “connecting people” the
slogan for Ericsson or
Nokia?

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Are these cellular phones
Nokia phones or
Ericsson phones?
Is “connecting people” the
slogan for Ericsson or
Nokia?

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Brain laterality

•Stimuli on the left go directly to the right hemisphere


•Stimuli on the right to the left hemisphere

àV e r ba l st i mul i (wor d s a n d
t e xts ) ge t a be tt e r r eca ll
w he n pos i t i on ed on t he r igh t
o f t he
p ac ) age ) c ommun ica t i on

àVisuals and non-verbal stimuli get a better recall


when positioned on the left of the package
/communication

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Eye-tracking

Registration eye movements

Eye focus is projected on


fovea

= condition to be processed
in the brains

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Measurement of emotions

 Challenge in research = Objective measures


 Neuromarketing techniques
 Brain scans
 Electro dermal techniques (hart beat, sweat,
…)
 Facial coding
 …..
 Hypnosis

Ethical? Privacy? Real life conditions?


 à Fea s ibi l i t ) i n pr ac t ice ?
H ow to i nt e rpr e t?
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Eyetracking Domains

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LIVE DEMO

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Consumer facts

How long are people looking at an individual search result in


r s in
te
Google ?

r c
1,1 second
a e r !

h a s tom
c

c u
l
2 5 e n ti a
What is the total gaze time at the first Google-results page ?

ht pot
to 10,4 second
a

r ig ion”

t he int roduc t
What is the average number of characters in a Google line ?
s e nd
u o
be
t te r
“1
s ec
25 characters
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Consumer facts

More Media More Stimuli

Less time to process


Split second decisions
Harder to get the attention

Importance of an efficient visual communication !


) Gain insights in how visual stimuli work

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Perception versus sensation

 Bottom-Up
- Perception = data-driven
- Starts with sensory data – raw input
-
 Top- Down
- Perception = conceptual driven
- Starts with stored knowledge &
expectations

Artificial boundary – both theories are applicable. Important is to what extent and in which
circumstances are they applicable?

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Influence of expectation

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Influence of
learning &
experience

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Agenda

1. Who we are

2. Behavioural Research - Eye-Tracking

Print ads Pack &


Email Websites
Outdoor Shopper

3. Sensory Research

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Outlook - Inbox

Only first words of subject line are read, sender name is the key element
Attention in first 15 seconds: Sender: 65 % of attention, subject: 35 %
Decision to open an e-mail or not: 1,5 seconds !

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Direct E-Mail

Show the key message in the first part of the mail


(without scrolling)

Limit the number of hyperlinks and make a hyperlink


prominent

Animated elements are distracting and lead to “click-


away” behavior if not linked with content

Avoid building up your message in an “advertising” way.


“pop-ups” and advertisements blindness

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Agenda

1. Who we are

2. Behavioural Research - Eye-Tracking

Print ads Pack &


Email Websites Outdoor Shopper

3. Sensory Research

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Content & Websites: F-
pattern

Learning:
First paragraph (and first google-hits) gets most attention
Bullet points, headers, keywords will guide the reader through the site

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F-pattern (as a result of
scanning behaviour)

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Google results: % of attention

First 3 organic search results are focused by 97 % of respondents


Sponsored results at right side of screen are focused by 31% of respondents

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Web Case


The Coca Cola corporate website should
mainly underline the “health, people &
environmental responsibility” of the Coca
Cola Company

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Market
Annual report

People
Funding

News-headlines
Environment &
Community

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Quanti results

 What is the key message of this homepage ?


47% = promo of Coca-Cola beverages


40% = health-issues & Coca Cola


Conclusion:
 Acceptable, but is it enough to open
the debate with the creatives ?

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SCROLL-LINE

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3

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Eye Tracking insights Cola
Case

Menu Bar is a crucial navigation point: is seen by


only 50% of visitors.

First focus point are product images, last focus point


is textual information covering the environmental
issues

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New site based on combined insights:
ENVIRONMENT
CLEAR MENU & HEALTH
STRUCTURE

PEOPLE & PRODUCT

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Agenda

1. Who we are

2. Behavioural Research - Eye-Tracking

Print ads Pack &


Email Websites
Outdoor Shopper

3. Sensory Research

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Example print media – Hot Spot

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Eye Tracking data: male or
female ?

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Would you get this result
out a quanti/quali?

E N
M
O
W

E N
M
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Is this hot spot from female or
male viewers?

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Would you get this result out a
quanti/quali?

E N
M

E N
M
O
W
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After… what we learned
out of quanti?
Overall liking
-54% (min. 7 on 10)
-Men vs Women
67% vs 42% (min. 7)
-

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After… what we
learned out of quanti?
Important / relevant 27% >
16% 48%
Not important / Not relevant

Gives new information 41% 34%


Doesn’t give new information
33% <
52% 18%
Pleasant Unpleasant

Credible
46% < 23% 39%
Incredible

Distinguishing 34% >37% 22%


Ordinary / Banal
45% 37%
Clear / easy to understand Difficult to understand
23% < 24% 51%
Invites to buy the product Doesn’t invite to buy the produ
55%
63% > 16%
Aimed at men Aimed at women
28% >

n= 131 Benchmark top 2% Top 2 % Bottom 2 %


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After… what we learned out
of quanti and quali?

•The divergence in overall appreciation between men


and women is perceptible in different evaluated aspects
of the advertisement

•Something is wrong with the credibility, relevance and


easiness to understand

•Symbolism of perfume, not female, no projection/link
with target group

But what is the exact problem ?

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Reading Pattern

3 4

6
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Key findings Eye Tracking

The elements that tell what After is, are positioned at the
end of the reading pattern (headline, hyperlink and
bottom text)

This implies that the explanatory information (such as


the product definition in the bottom text) of this rather
unknown product is overlooked by most of the viewers.

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Tachistoscopic test 1

Test of 5 print ads in 1½ second

Which brands did you remember?

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Have you remembered all brands?

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Tachistoscopic test 2

What did you see , recognize?

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Is this ad impactful ?

Is this advertisement/billboard capable of


communicating fast the right message and
correct brand?
NO !

SOME RESULTS Test with n=100 respondents

Exposure 1/100 sec Exposure 1/10 sec Exposure 1 sec


Incorrect brand 11% Virgin ? 9% Club Med (?) 32%
attribution (Virgin) Ad in general 9% Snow/sun 27%
No brand 89% White and red Touroperator 19%
85% No brand noticed
noticed 10%
Virgin ?
4%

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Some results (sample size=100)

Importance of positioning the text


blocks and pictures.
Text in the periphery is less quick
perceived in comparison with a
central positioning

Be identifiable and recognizable.


Central positioning and integrated
communication
(logo club med = blue)

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Is this ad impactful ?

Is this advertisement/billboard capable of


communicating fast the right message and
correct brand?
YES !

SOME RESULTS Test with n=100 respondents

Exposure 1/100 sec Exposure 1/10 sec Exposure 1 sec


AXA (?) 67% AXA (?) 78% AXA 94%
Een kinderhand 11% Een kinderhand 41% Nooit meer 51%
Blauw logo 15% verdwalen…
Een armband 9%
met kinderhand

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Some results (sample size=100)
Communicate very fast your
message, brand, product…
Get a correct brand attribution quick
in the communication
process
Be attractive and try to catch one’s
attention
Central positioning of the logo
Less is more – KISS
keep it stupid and simple

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Agenda

1. Who we are

2. Behavioural Research - Eye-Tracking

Print ads Pack &


Email Websites
Outdoor Shopper

3. Sensory Research

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Consumer facts

What % of purchase relat ed decisions are m ade a t


p oint of sa le s?
Depending on t he product cat egory 50% to 70%!

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Consumer facts

 In how many seconds are


decisions of consumers made at
point of sales for low involvement
goods?


On average in 2-3 seconds à
) a x ) ) s ec on d s

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Which Brands did you see?

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Consumer facts

u k n o w b ef o r e
Do yo which
s ho p p i ng
t er g e n t b rand to
de
buy ?

Writes down brand name : 22%


Brand in mind: 39%

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Consumer facts

The proliferation of SKU’s


àEnhances ‘shopper stress’ to make choices
àDemands a facilitator for the shopper

What is the average number of different articles in a supermarket?

20.000 articlesshouting for the shoppers’ attention who spends on


average 30-45 minutes in the shop!
And about 50 products in the shopping cart per visit.
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Consumer facts

What is the main reason why 8 on 10 new product launches flop?



Products were not considered at shelf (‘unseen is
unsold’)

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Consumer facts

What are the steps in the decision process in shop


when standing before shelf?

 Step 1: scanning products on shelf


 (scanning highly driven by memory, often unconscious level,
scanning brands out of considered set on the base of vague
colour codes)
 Step 2: Selection of brands

 Step 3: Brand choice

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SOURCE: MARTIN LINDSTRÖM (2006)
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The functions of a packaging

DIRECT FUNCTION A HELP TO GUIDE TO SEDUCE


CONSUMERS CONSUMERS
Pack – Protect – store
Keep fresh - open & Support consumers’ Packages can evoke
close easily shopping target behaviour
§0

Help to find the object - Inform or


Implicit aim / Elicit basal reactions
motivate explicitly/implicitly²
-

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Source: Workshop Packaging Belgisch verpakkingsintituut Jan 2008 Prof. De Witte KUL
Implicit = Automatic, in a Reflex

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What is the most luxury water ?

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Marketing = bridging
The packaging is the bridge

Product
Services

Features
Technicalities

Needs
Desires
Demands Product Intrinsic = Brand Extrinsic =
body soul

From:
Motivation The Naked Consumer (1994)
Humanizing Marketing – the importance of diagnostic research (2007)
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Source: Workshop Packaging Belgisch verpakkingsintituut Jan 2008 Madelaine Janssens
2 moments of truth ….

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The first moment of truth

ather date?

à ) timulate t

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The first moment of truth

Visibility Eye Movement Registration


Findability in combination with
Tachistoscopic research
Esthetical attraction power

Brand & product image

Price elasticity Gespecialiseerde


kwalitatieve & kwantitatieve
onderzoeksmethoden

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The second moment of truth

With whom would you spend the rest of your life?

Reliable Cheats
Romantic Never there for you
Great lover Always having fun without
Honest you
Shops when you look after
the kids
à )uild repurchase and lo)alt)

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The way the product is packed
influences the relationship building

Which plane would you fly?

 “Trustable”, “save”, Toy, playful, risky


“solid”
From:
The Naked Consumer (1994)
Humanizing Marketing – the importance of diagnostic research (2007)
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Source: Workshop Packaging Belgisch verpakkingsintituut Jan 2008 Madelaine Janssens
The different development stages
of a new packaging

High Nearly finished Finished


Early stage
stage Stage
Number of test designs

Pack Test
Concept test
Qual/Quant
SENS-PACK
Quali in depth TACHI + EMR + VERBAL
Quant pack Screeners

Low
Early Final
Development Process
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Communication Model (Van Raaij W.F. 1998)

Confrontation stimuli

Sensorial coding
Scanning
Primary affective reaction

Cognitive processing
Focussing
Secondary affective reaction

Buying Intention
Behaviour
Buying behaviour

Usage & Satisfaction


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Translated into the main challenges of a pack

Confrontation stimuli

Instant recognition
1. Visibility & identification
Scanning Shelf impact
Distinguishing power

2. Cognitive processing = Seeing & Brand Block value


understanding Main message/claims
Focussing Product features

Communication
3. Affective processing Communicative values & brand equity
Imagery
Consumer appeal
Behaviour

Usage & Satisfaction

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Model for measuring consideration ~ impact

CONSIDERATION = f (MEMORY BASED EQUITY x VISUAL EQUITY)

Sample “legs” are balanced in terms of current


considered set

VISUAL EQUITY = f (Fixation x Duration x Re-examination x Findability)

* Measuring the value of POP marketing with commercial eye-tracking data. Pierre Chandon, INSEAD
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DIFFERENT SET-UPS FOR PACK & SHOPPER

Real life shelves


billboards

Print ads
Emailings * Websites
Magazine covers
Shelf simulation
Packaging
In store impact
Shopper research
Point of sales
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SET-UP

Screen, projected from


behind

Eye-tracking device

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LEARNINGS

Shopping, a rational process ?

31 % 68 %

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Image of first 7 seconds

Focus on Contrast Points

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Gaze opacity for one scenario at 7 sec
Above eye-level = 30% decline in visibility - 30%

Eye-level - 10%

Arm-level = maximum visibility #1

- 10%
Bottom shelf = 20% decline in visibility - 20%

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LEARNINGS

Attraction Power: Focus within 3 seconds

41 % 26 %
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LEARNINGS

Fixation Order

3 1

2 3
1
2

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Case study Fair Trade

7,6 Seconds
Benchmark: 3,4

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Case study Fair Trade

1,9 Seconds
Benchmark: 3,4

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FAIR TRADE IS NOT IN FIRST STEPS OF THE DECISION
TREE (Except for Greens)

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Is there a real behavioural difference when
introducing small pack changes ?

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Shelf Visibility of Packaging

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 What is the difference in attention area’s in
the two designs?

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 The message of Design 1 is “New Stretch
Quality”
 The message of Design 2 is “Lycra”. We see things differently
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Single & Consistent Message
Design for a single clear message: Eye tracking studies show that on average 5
seconds time, 3 to 4 elements can be observed: branding, main visual, product
descriptor + 1 claim.

“Build effect”: can be achieved if very consistent over all product portfolio -> Visual
cue
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The high involved reads claims
Research executed by Brian Wansink on soy
Claims:

20/80 principle:
80 % based product purchase decision
only on front of pack.

Short claims on the front side


Full claims on the back of the packaging

à leads consumers to more fully


process and believe the claim

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Priming effect of Claims

§Unconscious

§Perifere cues / priming


Number of arguments
Color
Weight of the pack
Number of steps in the manual
Often semantic links
High is good, heavy is
robust, green is pure, …

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Use the right color in your pack/stimuli

“Colors, like features, follow the changes of the emotions" Pablo Picasso
(1881-1973)

Red is energy: Green is self- Bleu is safe: Yellow is


see the red assurance: see the blue in convivial: the
piece affecting the green of the Belgacom yellow of
the bull, see Heineken as well as Volvo Lipton tea and
Coca Cola and logo and Spa Fanta
Spa Red Blue

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Some packages & shopper
insights

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1. Design for visibility
 Remember the first seconds

Visibility in the shop is a matter of contrast


 There is a strong positive correlation between shelf visibility and
purchase intention/consideration.


Catch the attention!
2 . D e sig n f or sh op -a b ilit y
Ensu re sh oppe r s find t h e pr odu ct t he y w a nt t o b uy

Take care of cat egory codings


Consist ency in lay-out , codings, house st yle is im port ant . POS
m at erials m ay guide t he consum er t o your newest product s
Ca t ch t he a t t e n t ion !

3 . D e sig n t o d r ive con su m p t ion


Link t o t h e se cond m om e nt of t r ut h

The fast est way t o kill a product is t o creat e expect at ions t hat it
does not m eet

Ca t ch t he a t t e n t ion !

4 . D e sig n f or d if f e r e nt ia t ion
It is crucial for a packaging t o em body a key dim ension on an
im m ediat e, int uit ive level, wit hout relying on t ext or claim s

Catch the attention!


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 1. Design for visibility


Remember the first seconds

There is a strong positive correlation between shelf visibility and purchase


intention/consideration.


Catch the attention!

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Shape, Logo, Color , Size, Pack promo etc.

 Colour Blocking
Which is the category colour of Paprika/pepper
chips/potatoes?

Unique shapes – differentiate from competition

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Visibility in the shop is a matter of CONTRAST

And cont rast com es from many sources:


Shape, Logo, Color , Size, On pack promo, Shelf stoppers etc.

Enhances visibility:
Striking and contrasting colours in shelf
Colour blocking
Unique shapes

Starting point = mostly a point of visual CONTRAST


From there consumers scan to the right or downward

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Source: PRS International
Some learnings

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 2. Design for shop - ability



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Findability

Ensure that shoppers find the product they want to buy

POS materials to support findability (shelf stoppers)


àFacilitate the shopper experience

Consistency in lay-out – info – house style


àIntegrated communication: be identifiable – recognizable

Focus on CORE product benefits: What do you really want to


communicate?

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 3. Design to drive consumption



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Link to the “Second Moment of Truth”

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Have we created realistic expectations?

§Packaging Functionality Exercises


– Holding and Dispensing, opening /closing

§Product Usage & Consumption Patterns


– Tasting, Experiencing, odour, colour etc.

The fastest way to kill a product is to create


expectations that it does not meet.

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 4. Design for differentiation


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It is best to visually “Own” the dimension that ties most directly to the end
benefit.

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Agenda

1. Who we are

2. Behavioural Research - Eye-Tracking

Print ads Pack &


Email Websites
Outdoor Shopper

3. Sensory Research

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The different senses are at play:
5 senses + the 6th sense

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But sight is not the only driver….

HEAR SMELL

SEE

TOUCH
TASTE

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Sensory Lab

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Sensory Lab
Definition

Controlled circumstances, the sensory


characteristics of products (taste, smell, mouth
feeling, sight, sound) are measured by persons, as
measure instrument (panel).

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Sensory Lab
Definition

Descriptive research (analytical)


Ø Measure objective differences
between products, like there are:
sweetness, strawberry-aroma,
granularity, saltiness,…
Ø What is the (sensory) profile of the
different products?
Ø By trained panel members

Evaluative research (preference


research)
Ø Measure subjective differences
between products, measure how
the consumer evaluates and
appreciates the product.
Ø Which product is preferred and
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Beoordeling smaak, nasmaak, mondgevoel door het smaakpanel

S=Smaak
NS=Nasmaak
G=Geur

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Sensory Lab
Research questions

On behalf of product development:


Ø Testing products in the development phase


Ø Process Control

Ø Quality Control

Ø Product maintenance and optimalisation


Ø Promotion & communication


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Fieldwork services
Mobile Test Unit

What?
Fully equipped for ad hoc research (capi stations,
kitchen…)
Can be placed throughout the country

Advantages
Mobile
A fixed motivated and supervised team of
interviewers
Enables the recruitment of real “fresh”
respondents
Obtain rather quick a large nationally spread
sample
Profitability higher than for hall tests

Limitations
Limited length of interview = max. 20‘
Rather large sample size needed if coverage
whole country

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What is a good taste ?

4 base - tastes

Bitter

Sour

Salty

Sweet
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CASE
Peeters & Pichal studie (radio1)

Franse wijnen
Vergane glorie of Franse trots?

Een onderzoek naar het


smaakverschil tussen wereld-wijnen en Franse
wijnen (druif:Merlot)

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Methodologie

2 Franse wijnen (druif:Merlot) werden afgezet tegen 3


wereldwijnen (druif: Merlot)meer bepaald:

Om de onderzoeksvragen te beantwoorden
organiseerde Rogil 2 onderzoeken
1.Blinde objectieve profilering van de
testwijnen in het sensorisch labo door
Experten panel
2.Blinde evaluatie van de testwijnen door de
doorsnee consument op centrale locatie
(Leuven)

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La Capitana en Marianne spannen de kroon en scoren op zowel kleur, geur, smaak als
nasmaak beter dan de andere wijnen.
Twee groepen van wijnen qua complexiteit: La capitana en Marianne = complexe wijnen en
Jacobs Creek, Autrement en Latapie = minder complex

ACE

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Evaluatie van de wijn: Kleur, Geur, Smaak, Afdronk op schaal van 0 tot 10. Complexiteit opschaal van zeer complex tot helemaal niet complex
De betere evaluatie voor La Capitana en Marianne tekent zich ook af in de voorkeur.

CDE

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Welke van deze wijnen verkiest u op de eerste plaats?
De voorkeur voor de wereldwijnen Marianne en La Capitana tekent zich nog duidelijker
af onder de frequente wijndrinkers.

*
CDE
Voorkeur per gebruikersgroep

CDE

*
E
E
E E

* Significant verschil tussen frequente en niet-frequente wijndrinkers


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Welke van deze wijnen verkiest u op de eerste plaats?
Consumenten hebben het duidelijk moeilijk om het land van herkomst te herkennen van de wijnen.
Tussen de 21% en 34% kan het correct = gokkans

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Kan u voor elke Merlot wijn die u zonet heeft geproefd aangeven welk het land van herkomst is?
Beoordeling uiterlijk/geur door het smaakpanel

G=Geur

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Methodology

Repeated measurements

April 2005
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 Sip-room or Test Booths

The respondents are guided to the SIP-room and asked to


take place at a table. There will be given a briefing to
explain the procedure during the evening.

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Output
Example of results
Evaluation after each serving: TOTAL SAMPLE
OVERALL LIKING

7,0

6,5

6,0

5,5

5,0

4,5

4,0
Pre- Serving 1 Serving 2 Serving 3 Serving 4 Post-
exposure exposure

MBWRIG06 MBWRIG07 MBWRIG08 MBWRIG09

N= N= N= N=
N= 32/29/30/27/22/24/20/13/13/10/8/8/8 N=
119 29 24 17 117
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9-point scale (Mean scores)
What is a good taste?

Variance

Correct complexity of taste

Being able to “recognize” the taste

Having the luxoury of choice

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Variation

Variation prevents sensory specific satiety

-> Buffets

Becel Pro Activ

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The right taste complexity

Complex products:
–several senses
–several taste sensations

Complex = attention = rest (lounge)

Simplicity = volume = satiety

Ep Köster: Bring the last but one most appreciatied product on


the market, with just a bit more complexity

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Recognising taste

(Learn) to recognize taste

Taste is (also) what you expect of it -> blind cola test

Preference and aversion are also teached

Taste is largely a recollection of tastes

Best recipe = a bit new with a lot familiar …

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But sight is not the only driver….

HEAR SMELL

SEE

TOUCH
TASTE

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Taste is (also) smell !

•Orthonasal
•Retronasal

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Product smell

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The different senses are at play:
smell and taste is a well married couple

 Also smell and taste contribute to the experience:


 Sweet tastes add to the experience of regression
and comfort

 Bitter tastes add to the experience of maturity and


adulthood

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A sensory game…

Which brand do you smell ? ?

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But sight is not the only driver….

HEAR SMELL

SEE

TOUCH
TASTE

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Sight

Sound Taste

Smell Touch

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The different senses are at play: hear

The “solid and dry click” of The metal like click of a low end
the door of a prestigious car adds to the experience of
car adds to the experience fragility, simplicity….as well as
of solidity, strength, a less safe car.
power….as well as status. l
l

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A sensory game…

Which brand is connected to this sound ?

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But sight is not the only driver….

HEAR SMELL

SEE

TOUCH
TASTE

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A sensory game…

Which brands do you recognize ?

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The different senses are at play:
see - morphology

Round: is warm hearted Square: is reliable and controlled

Triangle: is energetic and vivid Rectangle: straightforward and solid

Amorphous: is confusing or creative

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The different senses are at play: touch

One eats and drinks with touch:


 A soft drink in can from fridge feels far colder than the same soft
drink taken from the same fridge in PET.
 Even in case the objective temperature of the liquid inside is the
same or even colder in PET, the impression is that the drink is
not as cold.


 Satisfactionoffered by the can is one step ahead in
view of the needed refreshment one takes a soft
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I wish you a
« sense-full » career !

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Reality Driven Research

Contact for more info

Ludovic Depoortere Johan Puttemans


Managing Director Research Director

l.depoortere@rogil.eu j.puttemans@rogil.eu

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