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Managing

Human
Resources
e m a i l : m a r t i n a .t ra n . m s @ g m a i l . c o m
The Personnel Aspects of Management

Planning labor
Training employees
needs and Providing incentives
and developing
recruiting job and benefits
managers
candidates

Conducting job Appraising


Communicating
analyses performance

Orienting and Building employee


Selecting job
training new relations and
candidates
employees engagement

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What does HR do?
HR covers a wide range of interconnected activities, but essentially
they’re all about generating performance through people.

HR professionals recruit, train and develop employees, and look at how


they get rewarded. They’re dealing with legal issues, helping to shape
the culture of their organisations, and focusing on what keeps their
colleagues productive and engaged.

CIPD (2013) HR Careers Guide London: CIPD


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Managing: Five Basic Functions
Management Process

Planning

Organizing Assign tasks for subordinates

Staffing Recruitment & selection

Leading Motivating subordinates

Controlling Controlling quality


Managing performance

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Human resource planning
Internal External
Organisational needs/ vision/ mission Supply of labour

Skills requirements Labour costs

Workforce profiles Workforce skills

Government policy

Labour market competition

Changing nature of work

Employee expectations

Impact of automation

Demand for products and service

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Internal factors: Changing organisation
The demand for employees are affected by the demand for products & services

CAUSED BY:
- Globalization
Contracting: - The increase use of
technology
• A reduction in the number of
- Offshoring
employees
- Outsourcing

Expanding
• An increase in the number of
employees

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Human resource planning

Offshoring Outsourcing
• Moving • Setting up a
production and contractual
service provision relationship
to countries with with an external
low wages but provider
similar or even
higher skills

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External factors
Factors derive from external
environment
◦ Types and the availability of
employees

◦ Market prices

◦ Governmental policies

◦ Labour market competition

◦ Employee expectations

◦ The changing nature of work

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Role of government as:

Legislator (lawmaker): Employment law

◦ Minimum salary

Employer (public sector, civil service): “Model employer”

Represents + influences public opinion

Slide 11
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The minimum pay-rate 2018 for different regions in Vietnam

Source: http://ketoanthienung.vn/muc-luong-toi-thieu-vung-nam-2018.htm 1-12 1-12


The Economic Environment
Tertiarisation:

Decline of manufacturing

Rise of service sector (tertiary sector)

◦ Primary service sector: low skilled, low paid (e.g. cleaning, supermarket
check-out, McDonalds)

◦ Secondary service sector: high skilled, high paid (e.g. law, finance,
accounting, consultancy)

Slide 13
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Workforce Diversity Trends

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Technology: Impact of automation

IN MANUFACTURING:
◦ Mechanisation (use of machines that assist workers)
◦ Automatisation (use of robots that replace workers)
◦ 1984: 44% of manufacturing firms use electronics
◦ 1998: 87% (source: WERS)
IN OFFICES:
◦ Use of word processors/PCs (since mid 1970s)
◦ 1984: 25% of workplaces (25+ empl.) use word processors
◦ 1998: 90% (source: WERS)

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Economic & Workforce Projections
Unemployment rate

Slow-growing labor force

Aging population

Unbalanced labor force

The needs to attract top talents who can be multi-


tasks

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Recommended Sources
HRM/Employment Relations textbooks (e.g. Brewster et al, 2011)

Academic journals (e.g. Journal of Human Resource Management, Journal of


Management)

HR Practitioner sources (e.g. CIPD publications, People Management magazine)

Newspaper articles (e.g. Financial Times, Independent, Guardian, not tabloids


like, for example, the Sun)

CIPD website (www.cipd.co.uk)

https://www.sciencedirect.com/

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