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COMMONLY USED FOREIGN TERMS

MAXIMS/FOREIGN TERMS

Ab Antiquo – From ancient times.


Ab Initio – From the very beginning.
Actus Reus –The physical act of involving in crime; wrongful act.
Ad hoc – For a particular purpose.
Ad Idem – Of the same mind.
Ad Valorem – According to the value.
Addenda – List of additions.
Alias – Otherwise called.
Amicus Curiae – A friend of court, the name is given to lawyer appointed
by a court to represent a poor litigant.
Audi Alteram Partem – Hear the other side.
Auterefois – A person cannot be tried for the same offence twice.
Auterfois Acquit – Formerly acquited.
Auterfois Convict – Formerly convicted.
Bona Fide – In good faith, honestly.
Bailiff – A subordinate officer of the court who executes writs and other
orders.
Causa Causans – The immediate cause.
Caveat – An order given to ‘let him beware’.
Caveat Emptor – Let buyer beware.
Caveat Venditor – Let the seller beware.
Consensus Ad idem – Agreement as to the same thing.
Culpa - Wrongful default.
Damnum Sine Injuria – Damage without legal injury.
De facto – In fact.
De jure – In law.
De Novo – New.
Decree – Order of court pronounced after hearing the case.
Doli Capax – Capable of crime.
Doli Incapex – Incapable of crime.
Double Jeopardy – A second prosecution for the same offence.
Emeritus – Retired after long service.
Ex Aequo Et Bono – In justice and good faith.
Ex Gratia – As a favour.
Ex Officio – By virtue of office.
Ex Post Facto – Acting retrospectively.
Faux Pas – Tactless mistake.
Force Majeure – Beyond one’s control; a natural catastrophe.
Ibid – In the same place.
Impasse – An insoluble difficulty.
In Personam – Proceeding or directed against or reference to a specific
person.
In Re – In the matter of.
In Rem – Right available against the world at large.
Injuria Sine Damunum – Legal injury without actual damage.
Innuendo – An innocent statement which has a hidden defamatory
meaning.
Inter Alia – Among other things.
Intestate – Dying without leaving a will.
Ipso Facto – By reason of that fact.
Jus – Right.
Laissez Faire – Freedom of contract; non-interference by State.
Lex – Statute.
Lex Fori – Law of the court in which the case is tried.
Lex Loci – The law of the place (land).
Locus Standi – Right to be heard in court.
Mala fide – With bad faith.
Mesne = Intermediate.
Modus Operandi – Mode of operating.
Mutatis Mutandis – With necessary changes being made.
Non obstante – Not withstanding.
Noscitur a Sociis – Meaning of word can be gathered from context.
Nudum Pactum – An enforceable contract.
Obiter Dicta – Remark of a judge; by the way.
Per – As stated by.
Per Curiam – By the court.
Per Se – By itself.
Pro Bono Publico – For the good of the public.
Pro Rata – In proportion.
Quantum Merit – As a person earned.
Quasi judicial – Sharing of qualities of and approximating to what is
judicial.
Quid Pro Quo – Something for something.
Quorum- Minimum number of persons necessary for conduct of
proceedings.
Raison D’etre – Reason for the existence of a thing.
Ratio Decidendi – Principal laid down by the court in deciding a case.
Sine Die – Indefinately.
Status Quo – To maintain the present state of affairs.
Sub Judice – Under judicial consideration or in course of trial.
Subpoena – An order of the court to a person to appear and give evidence
before it.
Sui Generis – The only one of its kind.
Suo Moto – On its own.
Supra – Above.
Ultra Vires – Beyond the power.
Vide – Refer to.
Vis Major – Irresistible natural catastrophe; act of God.
Void – Have no legal effect.
Volenti Non-fit Injuria – Damage suffered by consent is not a cause of
action.
3Rs - Reading, ‘riting, and ‘rithmatic
- Responsibility, Restrain, and Respect (Montel Williams 1996)
- Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. (CSR –carbon emissions)

‘sic’ (full form: sit erat scriptum ) – means ‘thus’ (in full means- “thus was
it written”). It is inserted after a quoted matter has been transcribed
exactly as found in the source text, complete without any erroneous or
archaic spelling , surprise assertion, faulty reasoning or other matter that
might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription.
‘sic’ used to call attention to the original writers’ spelling mistake or
erroneous logic.