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STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

AINI HAZWANI MOHD SHAHRIR


IQWAL HANEEF SHAMSURI
MUHAMMAD ARIFF LUQMAN AZMAL
INTRODUCTION

• Capital of Sweden and the most populous urban area in the Nordic countries.
• 962,154 people live in municipality
• 1.5 million live in urban
• Consist 14 island
• Awarded 2010 European green capital award by EU Commission
STOCKHOLM’S URBAN PLANNING
URBAN PLANNING

EXPANSION STRATEGY
as a tool for planning and
implementation

Concentrate
Use the attractive investment on Facilitate additions
of the inner city focus area and that creat value
connection

Exploit long-term
city development
potential
ATTRACTIVENESS OF THE INNER CITY

• Use the powerful resources to benefits whole Stockholm


• Creating dense neighbourhood
• Create jobs and opportunities
• For instance
- Hammarby Sjostad
- Stockholm Royal Seaport
- Hammarbyhojden
INVESTMENT ON FOCUS AREA

• Bringing viability to city planning and achieve cohesive Stockholm


• To create more connection between districts
• As a kick start have a higher rate of home building under current market condition
• For instance
- Kista-Jarva = Development through Kista Science City
- Skarholmen = Development of suburb
Farsta
Hagsatra-Ragsved
FACILITATE ADDITIONS TO CREATE
VALUE

• Projects that add to the urban assets


- workplace
- school and pre schools
- Commercial and public services
- Well design public spaces
• The achieve housing targets and sustainability objective
EXPLOIT LONG-TERM CITY
DEVELOPMENT

• Urban developments on a smaller scale can play a major role in improving


attractiveness in the short term and generating interest in more extensive
home building in the longer term
• Areas adjacent to commercial and industrial areas are the kind of land that is
particularly important to exploit in terms of its long-term city development
potential. Other examples include areas near future infrastructure projects and
urban corridors where there is the potential to transform over-wide streets in
order to make local areas better connected.
STOCKHOLM’S TRANSPORTATION
PLANNING
TRANSPORTATION PLANNING IN
STOCKHOLM

“TRAFFIC COMPRISES OF PEOPLE AND GOOD –


N OT V E H I C L E S ”

45 metres wide street to accomodate all the functions.


The majority of main thoroughfares in Stockholm are between 20 and 30 metres wide.
Bus Tram Regional/Suburban Rail
T R ANSP ORTAT I ON
I N STOCK H OL M
CONSI ST S OF:

Light Rail Metro Archipelago Boat


STOCKHOLM METRO ART

Stadion Station Solna Centrum Station Tensta Station

Kungstradgarden Station
P U B L I C T R A N S P O RT
DEVELOPMENT

“The metro currently


handles 1.1 million
passengers a day,
whereas its expansion
will provide service for
an estimated daily
ridership of 170,000.”
URBAN MOBILITY STRATEGY

Main
Network Road Safety
Strategy

Bicycle
Parking
Plan

Traffic & the Good


Pedestrian Traffic
Environment Traffic
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT BY
CARROTS VS. STICKS
Carrots = Sticks =
Entice desired Discourage
travel CARROTS (ENABLERS) STICKS (DETERRANTS) travel
behaviours Improved cycle lanes Environmental zones for lorries and behaviours
busses
Increased public transport use Congestion taxation
New ways of transport:
- Car-sharing clubs
- Better information
- Adaptive traffic signals
Good logistics
Clean vehicles
STOCKHOLM’S ENERGY
SOLAR ENERGY

• EnergyHub system developed by Ferroamp


• Boosts output and increases flexibility in solar
power installations, by capturing and storing solar
energy more effectively
• Continues at night and all through the winter.
WAVE ENERGY

• WaveSpring technology developed by CorPower


Ocean
• Can produce power from quite small waves, and
still survive really large, severe waves.
• Oscillates in resonance with the incoming waves,
strongly amplifying their motion and power
capture
HEAT ENERGY

• Climeon system
• Uses the temperature difference between hot and
cold water to create a pressure difference.
• Drives a turbine and the turbine drives a generator
HYDROGEN

• Ethanol research began in the 1980s.


• Sweden has been among the world leaders in this
field.
• But the environmental benefits compared with
petrol have been much debated since fertile land is
used to produce ethanol, which is made from sugar
canes, grains, sugar beets or cellulose
BODY HEAT

• So-called passive houses are built without


conventional heating systems and are kept
warm by the heat given off by their
occupants and electrical appliances.
• Sweden’s first passive house was completed
in 2001.
• Since then, more buildings have followed. In
Stockholm, the body heat from commuters
passing through the central station is used to
heat a nearby building, and in the southern
town of Växjö, there are passive high-rises.
STOCKHOLM’S RECYCLING
START EARLY

• Children are taught to recycle, making it a way of


life in Swedish communities.
• A national day on which children across the
country gather to pick up litter and clean up
their surroundings.
EVERYONE

• A recycling station can be found within


at most 300 meters from any residential
area.
• Swedish citizens get discount vouchers
as a reward for using nearby recycling
machines.
• Waste chutes have been designed to
channel trash straight into waste-to-
energy converters.
• Waste produced by the residents of a
building is directly transformed into
energy for their own homes.
CONCLUSION