Sie sind auf Seite 1von 16

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

KIDAPAWAN CITY DIVISION


SCHOOL GOVERNANCE AND OPERATIONS DIVISION
JP Laurel Cor Quirino Drive
Brgy. Poblacion, Kidapawan City

Women's Rights are Human Rights:


Republic Act No. 9710
Magna Carta of Women
Salient Features of R. A. 9710:
MAGNA CARTA OF WOMEN
A PRESENTATION BY
ATTY. EVELYN S. DUNUAN,
COMMISSIONER FOR INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, NCRFW

National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women (NCRFW)


The Philippine Machinery for the Advancement ofWomen
1145 J.P. Laurel St., San Miguel, Manila
www.ncrfw.gov.ph
Outline of Presentation:

 MCW’s Herstory

 Salient Features of the MCW


Background:
 Originalversion of the MCW was entitled
Magna Carta for Rural Workers, filed in
the 12th Congress (2001-2004).

 13th
Congress (2004-2007)– re-filing of bill
on Magna Carta for Rural Workers;
eventually revised as proposed Magna
Carta for Women; principal author-Rep.
Josefina Joson
 14th Congress (2007-2010)- re-filing of bill

 Formation of the Study and Action


Core Group (SACG), composed of
PILIPINA as convenor, other women's
NGOs and POs, NCRFW, staff from the
Supreme Court, and staffs of legislators ,
to study how the proposed Magna
Carta for Women can be further
strengthened and improved as a
national translation of CEDAW
Magna Carta OF Women

Significance of the preposition “of”:


To show ownership of the law by
women from all walks of life –
marginalized sectors, professionals,
academe, business sector, NGOs,
including those in government, who all
hoped, worked and lobbied for the
passage of the MCW.
SIGNIFICANT DATES
 December 10, 2008 (HOR); February 2, 2009
(Senate) - Approval on Third Reading
 March 3, 2009 - Bicameral Conference
Committee Meeting
 March 5 - Senate approved the Bicameral
Conference Committee Report
 March 13 - Senate recalled the Bicam Report,
reconstituted Bicam panel, which approved the
inclusion of the word “ethical” in the provision on
“responsible, legal, safe and effective methods of
family planning” under the Section on
Comprehensive Health Services
 TheBicameral Conference Committee
Report of the Magna Carta of Women
was approved in plenary by the Senate
and the House of Representatives on
May 19 and 20, 2009 respectively.
 12 out of the 24 senators were
proponents to the bicameral report
submitted.
 15 percent or 41 representatives out of
267 members of the lower congress
were proponents to the Magna Carta
of Women bill.
 PGMA signed the MCW into
law in Malacañan Palace on
August 14, 2009.
 Effectivity—15 days after
publication in at least two
newspapers of general
circulation.
 Magna Carta of Women is
numbered R.A.9710.
Salient Features
Coverage:
I. General Provisions
II. Definition of Terms
III. Duties Related to the Human Rights of
Women
IV. Rights and Empowerment
V. Rights and Empowerment of Marginalized
Sectors
VI. Institutional Mechanisms
General Provisions
 Declaration of Policy
 Affirms the role of women in nation building
 Ensures the substantive equality of women and men;
 Condemns discrimination against women, in keeping with
CEDAW and other International Instruments, consistent with
Philippine Law;
 Affirms women’s rights as human rights;
 Provides for the intensification of efforts to fulfill its duties
under international and domestic law to recognize, respect,
protect, fulfill and promote women’s rights and freedom,
especially marginalized women, in all fields
 Reaffirms the right of women to participate in policy
formulation, planning, organization, implementation,
management monitoring, and evaluation of all policies,
programs and services that affect them
General Provisions
 Principles of Human Rights of Women
 Universal and Inalienable: all human beings are free and
equal in dignity and rights;
 Indivisible: inherent to the dignity of every human being
whether in civil, cultural, economic, political or social issues;
 Interdependent and interrelated: the fulfillment of one right
often depends, wholly or in part upon the fulfillment of
others;
 All individuals are equal as human beings by virtue of the
inherent dignity of each human person
 Rights-based approach principles
Chapter V: Rights and Empowerment
of Marginalized Sectors
 Recognition and Preservation of Cultural Identity
and Integrity
 Peace and Development
 Participation in discussions and decision-making in the
peace process
 Inclusion of women’s concerns in the peace agenda
 Consideration for the specific needs of women and girls in
the protection of civilians in conflict-affected
communities
 Inclusion of peace perspective in education curriculum
 Recognition and support for women’s role in conflict-
preventions, management and resolution and
peacemaking, and in indigenous systems of conflict
resolution
Chapter V: Rights and Empowerment
of Marginalized Sectors

 Services and Interventions for women in


especially difficult circumstances
 Protection of Girl-Children
 Protection of Senior Citizens
 Recognition and protection of women’s
rights defined under the MCW, including
right to non-discrimination
 Prohibition of discrimination against
women
SEC. 23. Right to Livelihood,
Credit, Capital and Technology
1. Equal access to formal credit and
capital,
2. Equal share to the produce of farms and
aquatic resources; and
3. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES for returning
women migrant workers taking into
account their skills and qualification.
Corollary, the state shall also promote
skills and entrepreneurship development
of returning women migrant workers.
Thank
you!