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Saracal, Nadzma

Rota, Threcia
The world is moving forward. Don’t get left behind.
Insights in Public Speaking

“There are only two types of speakers in the world:


nervous and liars.”

Mark Twain
A good speech should be like a woman’s skirt:
Long enough to cover the subject and short enough to
create interest.

Winston Churchill
Aims of Entertaining Speech
- To share goodwill, joy, and pleasure to the audience.
How to Make your Speech
Entertaining
 Tell jokes;
 Share funny stories;
 Dramatize experiences; and
 Recall a scary story.
Steps in Writing an Entertaining
Speech
 Choose!
 Enjoy!
 Simplify!
 Visualize!
 Surprise!
Example Outline
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention Getter: personal story, joke
1.2 Message (opt for a less serious message)
1.3 Preview
2. Body (any or all of the following)
2.1 Events that led to your observation
2.2 Quotation that humorously reflects the message
2.3 Stories about others that can help the audience understand
the message.
3. Conclusion
3.1 Review
3.2 Restatement of the message
3.3 Link back to opening story or joke
Types of Informative Speeches
 Speech about objects or people
 Speech about processes
 Speech about events
 Speech about concepts
Speech about objects or people
- This focuses on tangible items like gadgets,
products, structures, or people. Visual aids may be
necessary.

Example:
New iphone model
Yourself
Speech about Process
- This focuses on a process or sequence of events.
Visual aids are necessary.

Example:
Photography
Web designs
Speech about events
-This focuses on an event that happened, is
happening or might happen in the future.

Example:
Zombie Invasion
Accident
Speech about concepts
- This focuses on beliefs, knowledge, theories,
principles or ideas.

Example:
Big Bang Theory
Bermuda Triangle
a. Chronological Pattern
- this can be used if you want to present the history,
evolution, or development of your topic in a
sequential order.
Sample Outline
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention getter
1.2 Thesis Statement/Main Point
2. Body
2.1 Step A, Year A, First
2.2 Step B, Year B, Second
2.3 Step C, Year C, Third
2.4 Step D, Year D, Fourth or Finally
3. Conclusion
3.1 Summary of the points
3.2 Memorable Statement
b. Spatial/Tropical/Categorical Pattern
- this can be used if you want to inform your audience
about the main features, descriptions, or categories of
your topic.
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention getter
1.2 Thesis Statement/Main Point
2. Body
2.1 Feature A, Description A, First Category
2.2 Feature B, Description B, Second Category
2.3 Feature C, Description C, Third Category
2.4 Feature D, Descriptive D, Fourth or final Category
3. Conclusion
3.1 Summary of the Points
3.2 Memorable Statement
c. Cause-Effect Pattern
- This can be used if you want to show the casual
relationship of events or phenomena.
Single- Cause Multiple Effects
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention getter
1.2 Thesis Statement/Main Point highlighting the cause of an event or
phenomenon
2. Body
2.1 Effect A
2.2 Effect B
2.3 Effect C
2.4 Effect D
3. Conclusion
3.1 Summary of the points
3.2 Memorable Statement
Single- Effect- Multiple Causes
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention getter
1.2 Thesis Statement/Main Point highlighting the effect of an event
or phenomenon
2. Body
2.1 Cause A
2.2 Cause B
2.3 Cause C
2.4 Cause D
3. Conclusion
3.1 Summary of the Points
3.2 Memorable Statement
Multiple Causes- Multiple Effect
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention getter
1.2 Thesis Statement/Main Point stating the multiple causes and
effects of an event or phenomenon
2. Body
2.1 Cause A
2.2 Cause B
2.3 Cause C
2.4 Effect A
2.5 Effect B
2.6 Effect C
3. Conclusion
3.1 Summary of the Points
3.2 Memorable Statement
Domino Effects
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention getter
1.2 Thesis Statement/Main Point stating the domino effects of an
event or phenomenon
2. Body
2.1 Cause A
2.2 Effect A
2.3 Cause B
2.4 Effect B
2.5 Cause C
2.6 Effect C
3. Conclusion
3.1 Summary of the point
3.2 Memorable Statement
d. Comparison-Contrast
- This can be used if you want to compare objects,
event or concepts underscoring their similarities and
differences.
Block
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention getter
1.2 Thesis Statement/Main Point highlighting the concepts
compared
2. Body
2.1 Object/Event/Concept A
2.1.1 Comparison Point A
2.1.2 Comparison Point B
2.1.3 Comparison Point C
2.2 Object/Event/Concept B
2.2.1 Comparison Point A
2.2.2 Comparison Point B
2.2.3 Comparison Point C
3. Conclusion
3.1 Summary of the Points
3.2 Memorable Statement
Point-by-Point
1. Introduction
1.1 Attention getter
1.2 Thesis Statement/Main Point highlighting the concepts
compared
2. Body
2.1 Comparison Point A
2.1.1 Object/Event/Concept A
2.1.2 Object/Event/Concept B
2.1 Comparison Point B
2.1.1 Object/Event/Concept A
2.1.2 Object/Event/Concept A
2.2 Comparison Point C
2.1.1 Object/Event/Concept A
2.1.1 Object/Event/Concept B
3. Conclusion
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Persuasive Speech
- is the form of communication that people of diverse
backgrounds mostly engage in.
- primary goal: is to influence thoughts, feelings,
actions, and behaviors or attitudes of your listeners.
Qualities of an Effective Persuasive
Speech
1. Well defined goal • What is your specific goal in mind
• Do you expect your audience to think
differently, act differently or both, after they
listen to your speech.
2. Clear main point • Is the main point of your speech clear to you?
• Is it specific and focused?
3. Sufficient supporting • Do you have factual statements, reliable sources or
ideas solid evidence to support your main point?
4. Logical reasoning • How will you state your arguments?
(concrete reasons why • Will you use any of the following?
your listeners should • Deductive (general evidence to specific)
support your ideas) • Inductive (specific evidence to general)
• Casual (cause/s and effect/s, or vice versa)
• Analogy (compared to things or situations)
5. Effective an d powerful ways to • Do you use any of the following
gain the attention of your audience effective techniques to grab the
attention of your listeners and
engage them in your speech?
• Powerful and relevant question
• Striking statistics
• Shocking incident
• Memorable anecdotes
• Humorous observations or
experiences
6. Compelling ideas to make your target • Do you appeal to your listener’s
audience feel and think mind?
• Do you appeal to your listener’s
heart?
7. Silent motives to target the salient • Do you motivate your audience by
needs of your audience incorporating ideas and thoughts
important to their growth and
Types Of Persuasive Speech
1. Speech that Questions Fact
2. Speech that Questions Value
3. Speech that Questions Policy
4. Speech that Refutes
Organizational Patterns
1. A. F.O.R.E.S.T. (anecdotes, facts and figures, opinion, rhetorical questions, emotive language superlatives, tripling)
(1) Anecdotes
(2) Facts and Figures
(3) Opinion
(4) Rhetorical questions
(5) Emotive language
(6) Superlatives
(7) Tripling
2. Problem Solution
(1) Identify the problem; and,
(2) Provide a solution, which will show the practicality of your proposal.
3. Problem-Causes-Solutions
(1) Identify the problem
(2) Analyze the root causes of the problem.
4. Comparative Advantages
(1) Identify the problem.
(2) Present at least two solutions to the problem.
(3) Compare the two in terms of practicality and feasibility
5. Monroe’s Motivated Sequence