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Purposive

Communication

Group no. 3
GLOBALIZATION PHENOMENON
Globalization
By Alex Gray (World
Economic Forum, 2017)
In simple terms,
globalization is the
process by which
people and goods
move easily across
borders.
GLOBALIZATION
Principally, it's an
economic concept - the
integration of markets,
trade and investments
with few barriers to slow
the flow of products and
services between nations.

There is also a cultural


element, as ideas and
traditions are traded and
assimilated.
EXAMPLE OF
GLOBALIZATION
The first Starbucks outlet opened its
doors in 1971 in the city of Seattle.
Today it has 15,000 stores in 50
countries.

The company was purchasing 247


million kilograms of unroasted
coffee from 29 countries.

Through its stores and purchases, it


provided jobs and income for
hundreds of thousands of
people all over the world.
What’s bad about it?

While some areas have flourished, others


have floundered as jobs and commerce
move elsewhere. Steel companies in the
UK, for example, once thrived, providing
work for hundreds of thousands of people.
But when China began producing cheaper
steel steel plants in the UK closed down
and thousands of jobs were lost.
Silk for Spices
One example is the Silk Road,
when trade spread rapidly
between China and Europe via
an overland route. Merchants
carried goods for trade back
and forth, trading silk as well as
gems and spices and, of course,
coffee.

In fact, the habit of drinking


coffee in a social setting
originates from a Turkish
custom, an example of how
globalization can spread
culture across borders.
Communication in
Globalization
Global Communication

Global communication is directly affected by


the process of globalization, and helps to
increase business opportunities, remove
cultural barriers and develop a global village.
THE IMPACT OF GLOBALIZATION ON
COMMUNICATION

As more people cross borders because of


globalization, more language contact
happens, making communication more
challenging.
Local and Global Communication
in Multicultural Setting
Global Communication
Global
Communication
Global Communication
is the development and
sharing of information,
through verbal and
non-verbal messages,
in international
settings and contexts
Example
One of the most common forms
of global communication is an
email.

A person in one country types a


message and clicks the send
button. The message is then
encoded into packets which are
sent across the internet to the
recipient. In another country,
the receiver logs in and decodes
the message by opening the
email, and retrieves the message.
Example
When someone from another
country reads your company's
web page, this too is an
example of global
communication.

The message is written and


encoded in HTML, uploaded to
a server, which is then accessed
across the internet and decoded
by a web browser – and
perhaps a translation plugin –
before the recipient reads it.
Local Communication
Local
Communication
Local communication is
being able to
communicate with the
members of your local
area. It can either be in
your local language
(mother tongue), or a
common language that
you speak within your
town.
Intercultural Communication
is a symbolic,

Intercultural
interpretive,
transactional,
Communication
contextual

process in which
people from different
cultures create shared
meanings.

effects on
communication
behaviour when
different cultures
interact together
COMMUNICATING ACROSS CULTURES
By Carol Kinsey Goman (2011)
Worldwide business organization have
discovered that intercultural
communication is a subject of
importance – not just because of increase
globalization. But also because their
domestic workforce is growing more and
more diverse, ethnically and culturally.

We are all individuals, and no two people


belonging to the same culture are
guaranteed to respond in exactly the same
way.
High Context vs. Low
Context
-Mediterranean, Slav.
-most Germanic and
Central European, Latin
English-speaking
American, African, Arab,
countries
Asian, American Indian
-leave much of the
message unspecified, to
be understood through
-expect messages to be
context nonverbal cues,
explicit and specific
and between the lines
interpretation of what is
actually said by contrast.
SEQUENTIAL VS
SYNCHRONIC
-North American,
-South America,
English
Southern Europe, and
German, Swedish, and
Asia
Dutch
-business people give -the flow of time is viewed
full as a sort of circle, with the
attention to one agenda past, present, and future as
item after another, view interrelated. This viewpoint
influences how organization
time synchronically, as
in those cultures approach
a constant flow to be deadlines, strategic
experienced in the thinking investments,
moment, and as a force developing talent from
that cannot be within and the concept of
Affective vs. Neutral

-more careful to
- readily showing monitor the amount of
emotions, people show emotion they display
their feelings plainly
by laughing, smiling, -Japan, Indonesia, the
grimacing, scowling, UK, Norway and the
and sometimes crying, Netherlands and most
shouting, or walking accepted in France,
out of the room the U.S, and Singapore
When it comes to communication, what's proper and correct in
one culture may be ineffective or even offensive in another. In reality,
no culture is right or wrong, better or worse just different. In today's
global business community there is no single best approach to
communicating with one another . The key to cross-cultural success
is to develop an understanding of, and a deep respect for the
differences.
Group III
Jamero, Larissa
Leocario, Marivette
Lopez, Sophia Ellaine
Mallorca, Marivic
Mendoza, Jomelyn
Navarro, Niña Virginia
Obuyes, Cariza Naomi
Octavo, Nikko
Pallesco, Allyza
Pastrana, Mar