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TELESCOPIC CROWNS AND

NON-RIGID CONNECTORS
Telescope prosthesis or double crowns
INTRODUCTION

Telescope prosthesis or double crowns

Telescope prosthesis or double crowns are a proven option for the prosthetic
treatment of dramatically reduced dentition. However, the production of such
a prosthesis places higher demands on the dental practitioner and the
technical laboratory involved.
A telescopic crown always comprises two parts:

1. The primary crown, or coping, which is permanently fixed in the mouth


to anchor teeth, and is preferably made from a suitable gold alloy;
2. The mounted, removable telescopic crown or secondary crown attached
to the prosthesis and made of the same alloy material.
HISTORY OF TELESCOPES

Telescope procedure was first described in 1886 by R Walter Starr and, later,
by Goslee and Peeso. Telescope or double crowns thus have their origins in
America and not Germany,
When we talk of telescopic crowns, we generally mean the parallel
telescopic crown

With the parallel telescopic crown, the inner telescopic element of each double
crown has parallel surfaces, and these are not only parallel to one another but also
parallel to the axis of attachment for the remaining telescopic elements.

The locking of the inner and outer telescopic crowns provides a connection that
can be released in one direction or axis only, by the dentist and the patient
themselves.
INDICATIONS

Double crowns can be used in the following situations

1. where there is a strongly depleted dentition


2. uncertain prognosis of individual teeth in a periodontally
damaged jaw (existing bone depletion, increased loosening of the
anchor teeth)
3. with a suboptimal distribution of the remaining teeth
4. for the retention of removable bridges
5. with implant techniques
CONNECTORS IN FPD

The portion of a fixed partial denture that


unites the retainer(s) and pontic(s)
CLASSIFICATION

•Rigid connectors
–Cast connector
–Soldered connector
–Loop connectors

•Non-rigid connectors
–Tenon-Mortise connectors
–Split pontic connectors
–Cross pin and wing connectors
–Dove Tail face
CONENCTORS IN FPD

Rigid Connector
•Most commonly used, ideal for short span FDP
•It can be made by casting, soldering or welding

–Casting : molten metal is casted in full unit die including pontics and retainer
–Soldering : use of an intermediate metal alloy whose melting temperature is lower
than that of the parent metal
–Welding : use of metal alloy having melting point as of parent alloy or joining by heat
or pressure
IDEAL REQUIREMENTS OF
CONNECTOR

• Wide enough to provide strength to the unit, not wide enough to hamper
the oral hygiene maintenance
•Occupy the normal interproximal areas –preserve the embrasure
•Placed lingually and incisally–esthetics
•Gap width of 0.25 mm
NON RIGID CONNECTORS:
INDICATION

• When it is not possible to prepare two abutments for a partial FPD with a
common path of placement –mesially tilted 2ndmolars
• large, complex FPDs
• uncertainty about an abutment’s prognosis: in case of abutment failure -
easier to replace or repair individually
• consists of anterior and posterior segments
• mandibular opening and closing stroke -flexes mediolaterally
• Rigid FPD -inhibit mandibular flexure -dislodgment
NON RIGID CONNECTORS:
DESIGN

Consist of
–mortise(female): retainer
orces of mastication are transmitted to the
•Accurate alignment terminal retainers, which make the middle
abutment
•Dovetail or cylindrically act as a class I lever fulcrum.
shaped
•parallel to the path of placement of the distal
retainer -dental surveyor
•prepared freehand in the wax pattern or with a
precision milling machine or prefabricated plastic
–tennon(male): pontics
SOLDERING

Soldering
•It requires: Filler (Solder), Flux, Antiflux and heat source

•Flux
–applied to a metal surface to remove oxides or prevent their formation
–Gold alloys : borax glass (55 parts), boric acid (35 parts), and silica (10 parts)
•powder, liquid, or paste form
–Base metal alloys : CrOis mainly formed, fluoride containing fluxes
Soldering
•Antiflux
–limit the spreading of solder -flow into undesirable areas

–Graphite for low temp. or iron oxide (rouge) in a suitable solvent such as
turpentinefor high temp
Brazing: the filler -melting point above 450°C. used in dentistry
Soldering: the filler -melting point below 450°C (842°F)