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Waste Disposal

PRESENTED BY:
FRENCESS LYZA A. FERNANDEZ
Waste Disposal

 Removing and destroying or storing damaged, used or other unwanted


domestic, agricultural or industrial products and substances.
 Disposal includes burning, burial at landfill sites or at sea,
and recycling.
Kind of Wastes

 Solid Wastes

 Liquid Wastes
Solid Wastes

- Wastes in solid forms, domestic, commercial and


industrial wastes.

Examples: Plastic, Styrofoam Containers, Bottles, Cans, Papers, Scrap


Iron, and Other trash.
Liquid Wastes

 Waste in liquid form.

 Examples: Domestic Washings, Chemicals, Oils, Waste Water from


Ponds, Manufacturing Industries and other sources.
Classification of Wastes according to their
Properties

 Biodegredable
- can be degraded (paper,woods,fruits and others)

 Non-Biodegradable
- cannot be degraded (plastic,bottles,cans,styrofoam container and
others)
Sources of Wastes

 Households

 Commerce and Industry


Methods of Disposal

 Dumping

 Controlled Tipping

 Inceneration

 Composting

 Manure Pits

 Burial
Dumping

 Dumping is a deposit or dispose of(rubbish waste, or


unwanted material), typically in a careless or hurried
way.
Controlled Tipping
 Controlled tipping or controlled burial is similar in principle to sanitary
landfill but at a smaller scale that is appropriate in rural areas. In
controlled tipping/burial, solid waste is disposed of into a dug pit and is
regularly covered with soil to avoid attracting disease vectors such as
flies and rodents.
Incineration

 Refuse can be disposed by burning or incineration .


It is the method of choice where suitable land is not
available. Hospital refuse which is particularly
dangerous is best disposed of by incineration.
Composting

 Compost – organic material that has decomposed


under controlled conditions to produce an organic
rich material.
Manure Pits

 Manure -used in rural households. -Covered with


earth after each day dumping. -two pits. -within 5-
6months decomposed refuse which is used for
fertilizer.
Burial

 This method is suitable for small camps. A trench


1.5m wide and 2m deep is excavated and at the end
of each day the refuse is covered with 20 to30 of
earth.
IMPACTS OF WASTE IF NOT MANAGED WISELY

• Affects our health


• Affects our socio-economic conditions
• Affects our coastal and marine environment
• Affects our climate
Impacts of waste on health

 Chemical poisoning through chemical inhalation


 Uncollected waste can obstruct the storm water
runoff resulting in flood
 Low birth weight
 Cancer
 Congenital malformations
 Neurological disease
 Nausea and vomiting
 Increase in hospitalization of diabetic residents
living near hazard waste sites.
Impacts of waste on Environment

 Waste breaks down in landfills to form methane, a


potent greenhouse gas
 Change in climate and destruction of ozone layer due
to waste biodegradable
 Littering, due to waste pollutions, illegal dumping,
Leaching: is a process by which solid waste enter soil
and ground water and contaminating them.
The 5 R’s of Waste Management

 Refuse

 Reduse

 Reuse

 Recycle

 Rot
Refuse

 Refusing will eliminate most of your trash.


 Learn to say no. Say no to produce wrapped in
plastic. Say no to freebies and bargains. Say no to
disposables. Say not to participating in unsustainable
practices.
Reduce

 Reducing waste is the most important thing we can


do. By reducing waste, we avoid the unnecessary use
of resources such as materials, energy and water. It
means there is less waste to manage.
Reuse

 Reuse something you already have instead of buying


something. Replace needing a single use item, with
something you can use over and over again. Both of
these options will save you money as well.
Recycle

 Convert (waste) into reusable material.


 After you have refused, reduced, and reused there
shouldn’t be much left to recycle. Still, make sure to
separate your trash so that those resources can be
reused instead of filling our landfills.
Rot

 Look into composting and start throwing food


scraps into the bin instead of the trash. You'll save
lots of waste and make a healthy, nutritious soil for
your plants.
WHAT SHOULD BE DONE

 Reduce Waste

- Reduce office paper waste by implementing a formal policy


to duplex all draft reports and by making training manuals
and personnel information available electronically.

- Improve product design to use less materials.

- Switch to reusable transport containers.

- Purchase products in bulk.


WHAT SHOULD BE DONE

Reuse

- Reuse corrugated moving boxes internally.

- Reuse office furniture and supplies, such as interoffice


envelopes, file folders, and paper.

- Use durable towels, tablecloths, napkins, dishes, cups, and


glasses.

- Use incoming packaging materials for outgoing shipments.

- Encourage employees/students to reuse office materials


rather than purchase new ones.
WHAT SHOULD BE DONE

Donate/Exchange

- old books

- old clothes

- old computers

- excess building materials

- old equipment to local organizations


WHAT SHOULD BE DONE

Conduct outreach program adopting an


ecologically sound waste management
system which includes:

 waste reduction
 segregation at source
 composting
 recycling and re-use
 more efficient collection
 more environmentally sound disposal
Conclusion

 Disposal of wastes is now largely the domain of


sanitarians and public health engineers. Health
professional may be called upon to give advice in
some special situations, such as coping with waste
disposal problems when there is a disruption or
breakdown of community health services in natural
disasters.
THANK YOU!!! 