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WRITING FOR EMPLOYMEN

APPLICATIONS
THE RESUMÉ
 A document that contains a brief account
of a person’s education, skills, work
experience, and other qualifications.
 Arrange categories strategically to reveal
the most impressive qualifications first
and de-emphasizing any weaknesses.
SECTIONS IN A CHRONOLOGICAL
RESUMÉ
 Heading – includes your identifying
information such as full name, address,
home phone number, cellphone number
and e-mail.
 Objective – This informs the reader of the
specific purpose of your resume, such as
application for an entry level position in a
company or organization.
 Education – lists the schools you have
attended. You may include your class
rank, average or honors/ advanced courses
that you have taken, if they are
noteworthy.
 Honors and awards – This lists any
academic and extra-curricular recognition
you may have received.
 School activities – This enumerates your
experience in school, including clubs,
class projects, sports, etc. Include the time
and period you were involved, as well as
duties and specific contributions. You
should also highlight leadership roles and
special recognition.
 Work experience – This reveals any
relevant work experience you may have
had (paid or voluntary). Include your job
title, the name lof an organization, the
dates of your employment, and your
specific duties and accomplishments.
Show tasks that reveal your technical,
communication, leadership and
interpersonal skills.
THE COVER LETTER
 Introduction – This part opens the letter
and specifies the position that you are
applying for.
 Body – This part emphasizes your
strongest points show how you meet the
employer’s needs. It is also essential to
highlight the benefits that the organization
will get from accepting you.
 Conclusion – This part of the letter is
where you request for an interview.
Remember to sound enthusiastic and
appreciative, and don’t forget to include
your contact information.
WRITING OFFICE
CORRESPONDENCE
DEFINING LETTERS
 One of the most common forms of
business correspondence is a business
letter.
 Letters have many uses. They are
important for the following reasons:
Permanent records of something are
required
Formality is needed
Messages are sensitive and must be
organized
CLASSIFYING LETTERS
 Positiveand neutral letters – these letters
communicate goodwill, neutral and
straightforward requests, and positive
messages. They are used for everyday
business, such as direct requests for
information and action, and responses to
these.
 Persuasive letters – These letters try to
convince the reader to perform a particular
course of action. Examples of these letters
include sales pitches.
 Negative letters – These letters contain
negative messages like bad news, poor
service, misunderstandings, complaints
and refusals. Special care should be taken
in writing these letters, because bad news,
may annoy, infuriate or disappoint the
reader.
MEMOS
 The most familiar form of internal
communication in the business setting.
Memos have various purposes, such as:
 Giving recommendations
 Requesting for information
 Sending orders to employees
 Providing responses to queries
 Sketching out procedures, rules &
regulations
 Reporting about finished actions or new
information
 Finalizing business decisions
WRITING AND ORGANIZING
MEMOS
 Know your reasons and goals for writing
the memo
 Do proper research on all your facts.
 Choose your audience for the memo
wisely.
 Formally begin the memo by labeling the
top of the page with “Memorandum”,
“Memo”, or other similar labels.
 Provide headings for your memo
indicating the name of the recipient, the
name of the sender, the date the memo is
written, and the subject for the memo.
 The subject line should be up front, clearly
worded, and specific about the content of
the memo.
 Introduction – Start by stating your
purpose for writing, and then follow this
up with a short abstract of the memo’s
body.
 Body – This part develops the main points
highlighted in your opening.
 Conclusion – This should briefly highlight
again your main points in the introduction.
Then, it should request an action from the
reader. If an action is not requested of the
reader, then the segment may end with a
courteous, closing thought.